Brian Cushing eager to get to work as a strength coach for the Texans

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Brian Cushing is the all-time leading tackler in Houston Texans history, but he was known almost as much for his offseason work as his on-field work. That was true in both a good way — he’s been known for an intense weight room work ethic since high school, when he worked out with the great trainer Joe DeFranco — and in a bad way, as Cushing was twice suspended for violating the league’s PED policy.

Now Cushing will have a new role with the Texans, joining the team as a strength and conditioning coach.

I’m excited for the opportunity,” Cushing told the Houston Chronicle. “I’m very passionate about the Houston Texans, the city of Houston and I’m ready to get back to work. I spent my entire career here. To be around the sport and still be here, it’s very motivating. The things I learned over the years, it’s a very mentally and physically tough game. I learned a lot in almost a decade. Anything I can pass down and let them know what to expect. A lot of guys come in bright-eyed and don’t really know what is going on in kind of all facets of life. It’s very exciting to pass on any knowledge and experience I have and try to help them. I want them to grasp the opportunity they have and realize how unbelievable a job you have.”

After his playing career ended, Cushing wanted to do something that would allow him to stay around the sport he loves.

“It’s obviously been my passion for my entire life, but I kind of came to a realization that this is something I would have to adjust to quickly,” Cushing said. “I wanted to be back around the game as quickly as possible. I had gone back and forth on my thoughts and options. You know when something just feels right.”

Being a Texan feels right for Cushing, whether as a player or a coach.

38 responses to “Brian Cushing eager to get to work as a strength coach for the Texans

  1. I can remember watching Cushing on Hard Knocks. After the blocking drill was over Cushing challenged Alfred Blue to 2-3 more blocking series with Cushing. I was thinking back then that Cushing might make himself a pretty good coach.

  2. Why are PEDs like a “no biggie” in NFL, but end of the world in MLB?

    —————

    I think it has to do with how much PED’s affected MLB records and single player performances. In the NFL it’s more difficult to quantify. But baseball? I remember watching Mark McGuire and Sammy Sosa go for the single season home run record in the late 90’s – it was magical, for lack of a better word. The nation seemed transfixed, and the night McGuire surpassed Roger Maris’ record of 62, the camera was there as he was hugging Maris’ family after the game…

    Then it all came crashing down. People realized that all the records and excitement was based on cheating; a lie. They questioned the accomplishments and records achieved in modern baseball. So I think that’s a big part of it.

  3. You want to build a staff with passionate guys that love football. They love winning. They’ll work extra hard and do whatever it takes. Those type of work habits tend to rub off on the players. Cushing won’t stop working until he’s the best in the business. The players will follow.

  4. Cush was the all time leader in tackles for the Texans, Defensive Team Captain, 2010 NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year, had 76 tackles in 2010 and 114 in 2011. He prospered under Wade Phillips defense and not so much in Crennel’s defense after his injuries mounted. He simply couldn’t cover that well with his knees. He was always a top motivator for the team and kept the defense intensity going. He will be an asset in the locker room, weight room and on the sideline for the team. Plus, the guys on the team love him.

  5. PED’s in football are no biggie because these guys spend all fall and winter spend each week getting into what amounts to 8 – 10 major car crashes every game. If your livelihood demanded this you too would be looking for a way to recover faster.

  6. In Baseball PED’s are almost strictly to gain a competitive advantage with the game in football it is to be able to leave the game walking..

  7. How is someone that has been suspended twice for PED use even allowed to be hired as strength and conditioning coach..? Shouldn’t that be an automatic disqualification for the job from the NFL’s standpoint??

  8. PEDs are woven into the fabric of the game. Now that they are socially unacceptable, people feel outraged by a person taking them. I read countless article on how Jillian Edelman should not have been able to play since he was suspended for PED. All I remember is if he was a baseball player… Well this is football. Look back I to the past and see dynasties were built on PED. We’re the Steelers that good or was it that a great number of the players were juicing. Raider too. Most major colleges. It was prevalent so it is more acceptable. Baseball is high an mighty. They are also hypocritical since steroids saved thier game.

  9. Baseball is all hand/eye coordination. That’s why Arnold Schwarzenegger wasn’t out hitting bombs in the 80’s. All the so called baseball purists don’t know squat. Until the 1920’s ground rule doubles were called Home Runs. Don’t believe me, look it up! How many of Babe Ruths 714 HR’s were actually doubles in today’s game. I believe a person figured out once it was 75. Also the stadiums in the early days of MLB were bandboxes. Yankee stadium was 280 feet down the lines. In the 70’s all the generic astro turf stadiums like the Vet, 3 rivers, Cincinnati, OAK Coliseum. All huge pitchers wastelands. HR’s went down. Players in the 20’s, baseballs heyday were out of shape in comparison to the modern athlete. All of baseballs numbers are skewed and can’t be judged the same way.

    As far as football. Lots of the Steelers players from the 70’s are dead because of Roid abuse. The Raiders from that era dropped like flies too. Lots of players getting ALS. Is that from CTE? Maybe but then why don’t all the players get it? Maybe combining roids & CTE?

    Anyway all sports are corrupt and you can’t compare era’s for multiple reasons.

    brunson80 says:
    February 8, 2019 at 7:56 am
    Why are PEDs like a “no biggie” in NFL, but end of the world in MLB?

    —————

    I think it has to do with how much PED’s affected MLB records and single player performances. In the NFL it’s more difficult to quantify. But baseball? I remember watching Mark McGuire and Sammy Sosa go for the single season home run record in the late 90’s – it was magical, for lack of a better word. The nation seemed transfixed, and the night McGuire surpassed Roger Maris’ record of 62, the camera was there as he was hugging Maris’ family after the game…

    Then it all came crashing down. People realized that all the records and excitement was based on cheating; a lie. They questioned the accomplishments and records achieved in modern baseball. So I think that’s a big part of it.

  10. psljax says:
    February 8, 2019 at 8:30 am
    PEDs are woven into the fabric of the game. Now that they are socially unacceptable, people feel outraged by a person taking them. I read countless article on how Jillian Edelman should not have been able to play since he was suspended for PED. All I remember is if he was a baseball player… Well this is football. Look back I to the past and see dynasties were built on PED. We’re the Steelers that good or was it that a great number of the players were juicing. Raider too. Most major colleges. It was prevalent so it is more acceptable. Baseball is high an mighty. They are also hypocritical since steroids saved thier game.

    ——————————————————————————————
    I would add that it was a bigger deal because it was a prominent player for the Patriots and he won MVP. Marcus Gilbert was suspended in 2017 for PED’s and started for the Steelers against the Jaguars in the playoffs the same year. There was no outcry over that. I’d bet you could find players every year in the NFL playoffs with a PED suspension.

  11. It’s the injury factor. Guys in football can say they were trying to rehab an injury & it’s completely understandable. Baseball guys don’t really have that excuse.

  12. He is a classic example of coaches and teams looking the other way. He is an undersized guy who juiced to get bigger while his infrastructure couldn’t support his new size. The ligaments, the joints, and bone structure were not built to handle the muscle size and use causing most of his injuries.

    Any half educated person in sports medicine or strength training will notice that but this just proves how rampant the use of PEDs is in sports.

  13. vikesfansteve says:
    February 8, 2019 at 8:57 am

    Also the stadiums in the early days of MLB were bandboxes. Yankee stadium was 280 feet down the lines. In the 70’s all the generic astro turf stadiums like the Vet, 3 rivers, Cincinnati, OAK Coliseum. All huge pitchers wastelands. HR’s went down. Players in the 20’s, baseballs heyday were out of shape in comparison to the modern athlete. All of baseballs numbers are skewed and can’t be judged the same way.

    ——————

    Sorry, but I think you are off a bit. While the Yankees played in the Polo Grounds for a while, which was short down the lines, it was ridiculously long to the other fields. Look it up and look at a picture of it. Left center to right center was all 440+ feet.

    That said, a guy popped for PEDs twice, and now hired as a strength and conditioning coach should forced his teams players to get twice as many random tests as any other team. Why would anyone think he wouldn’t turn a blind eye to any evidence that one of his players was using?

  14. I know he used to be a Texan, but wow, the optics of hiring someone popped for PEDs twice to be a strength coach is just terrible

  15. Making a guy who was busted multiple times for PEDs your strength coach is not the kind of look that I would want, but hey, what do I know.

  16. PEDs are taboo, but honestly they are like any other medicine when properly used in therapeutic dosages, and monitored. I wish the NFL would look into the medicinal use of HGH and Hormone replacement for athletes who are recovering from injury instead of banning outright. There is a big difference between administering them as medicine, and abusing vast quantities of them for an edge, and it would be pretty easy to test for the latter, while allowing the former.

  17. The baseball commercial said “Chicks dig the long ball”. In football, it’s about getting healthy to play.

  18. we should look for the Texans to have some HUGE dudes start the season only to see half of them on IR due to muscles that weren’t meant to be….in the real world.

    DUde is a complete fraud – he got here by Juicing, otherwise he’d be JAG

  19. thisistheendifyouletit says:
    February 8, 2019 at 5:30 am
    Why are PEDs like a “no biggie” in NFL, but end of the world in MLB?

    ========================================

    because most football injuries require an intense amount of rehab and supplements to recuperate from and rebuild the muscle to a functional level. theyre not quite like a “strained oblique” that gets someone a dl trip for a mid season vacation from standing there doing nothing every 20 minutes or so before you go to sit back down again.

  20. Is he going to tell the players what are the good PED’S? The rumor was that he was eating roids from HS on. Kind of ironic now that a dude who made his career by using PED’s is going to be a strength and conditioning coach for his former team.

  21. They just gave the SB MVP to a PED user. I’d think that would be of more relevancy than a middle of the road linebacker getting busted.

  22. I love how Pats fans have convinced themselves that their players use PED’s just for recovery from injury. One, that is 100% not true, and even if it were it is still not allowed in the NFL and cheating. Somehow though they believe their players are entitled to do anything they want as long as they the fan base can create some complete falsehood to make it ok in only their delusional minds.

  23. They just gave the SB MVP to a PED user. I’d think that would be of more relevancy than a middle of the road linebacker getting busted.
    ———————————————————————————
    You mean like Superbowl MVP Von Miller?

  24. The PED policy in the NFL is a sham. Since 1982 no QBs ever caught. Even reports of HGH sent to players homes, and they didn’t test one of them. Your favorite team is juicing. Every year the league throws a couple of sacrificial lambs. No big stars. You really think it’s just Cushing or Edelman. Pittsburgh had a team doctor convicted of distributing steroids and HGH without a prescription. No league investigation. It’s not just a couple of teams and it’s not just a couple of players. Steroids have been in pro football since Sid Gillman’s early chargers teams. Tim Couch admitted HGH use, but never failed an NFL drug test. Truth is nobody wants their teams players suspended, only their opponents.

  25. I find it kind of ironic that people love to bash a player that was caught using a banned substance, when in fact there are many players throughout the entire league on every team that use banned substances on a regular basis. Some of which win Super Bowls. It’s all fun and games until a player on their favorite team gets bashed. The fact of the matter is, the NFL’s banned substance policy needs serious review. Not all of the banned substances on the list are considered ” performance enhancers ” in the true sense of the word ” steroids. “

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