Tyrell Williams expects Antonio Brown’s presence to help him

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Tyrell Williams said after last season he considered himself a “No. 1 receiver” and hoped to go somewhere where he could become just that. Instead, Williams picked the Raiders after their trade for Antonio Brown.

The former Chargers receiver said he picked the Raiders because of Brown’s presence.

“Seeing AB come here, seeing some of the things they’re doing on the offensive side of the ball, it’s exciting,” Williams said in a press conference, via Scott Bair of NBC Sports Bay Area. “I’ve gone against the Raiders the past four years, so it’s an easy transition for me.”

Williams made 41 catches for 653 yards and five total touchdowns in 2018, giving him 155 receptions for 2,530 yards and 17 total touchdowns in his four seasons with the Chargers.

He expects bigger numbers with the Raiders even if he’s not the top target.

“Antonio’s going to draw a lot of attention,” Williams said. “When they’re doubling him, I’ll be able to get a solo matchup. I’m definitely looking forward to that.”

12 responses to “Tyrell Williams expects Antonio Brown’s presence to help him

  1. “Antonio’s going to draw a lot of attention,” Williams said. “When they’re doubling him, I’ll be able to get a solo matchup. I’m definitely looking forward to that.”

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    That’s right, they’re going to double AB and when he starts becoming a decoy instead of #1 then he’s going to whine and cry about not getting the ball enough.

  2. Took him 9 years to become a problem in Pittsburgh if the Raiders get a 3 or 4 pro bowl seasons out of him before he starts his crap, it was worth every penny and a 3rd and a 5th any day of the week.

  3. I’ve seen every snap this dude has played. He’s fast…a gazelle, but soft….and doesn’t make contended catches. He’s Malcom Floyd lite. Without any ability to contribute on special teams…there was no role for him anymore in LA.

  4. Don’t expect too much help. As Antonio Brown said when asked in 2017 about then rookie Juju Smith-Schuster. “It’s not my job to teach him and help make him better”.

  5. “Took him 9 years to become a problem in Pittsburgh if the Raiders get a 3 or 4 pro bowl seasons out of him before he starts his crap, it was worth every penny and a 3rd and a 5th any day of the week.”

    He was 30 minutes late to his introductory press conference. Based on everyone’s perceptions toward Mike Tomlin, AB needs to be fined/suspended or Gruden is a spineless, worthless coach.
    Of course he won’t be, because as Tomlin and Colbert knew – if you anger AB he will blow up. Tomlin and Colbert managed AB for 9 seasons. I give Gruden 2 at most. The fact that Mayock referred to AB as a kid in the press conference, the very word that angered AB so much when Colbert said it and he just ingnored it, lets you know what the real issue was. AB wanted paid, he torpeo’d his team to get paid. He’ll do the same in Oakland. It’s all about AB.

  6. No matter what I think of Brown, Williams can learn a lot from him–just as JuJu did. If Brown draws so much attention from defensive backs that it allows Williams to become a breakout receiver for Oakland as JuJu did for Pittsburgh, then things might start to get dicey.

  7. uh, wasn’t he getting solo coverage while playing in SD/LA with Keenan Allen on the other side? He didn’t do much with it there

  8. Yes, as I’ve written time and again – Tyrell Williams will be a good investment – but only if he learns to work on two things:

    1) “Chase the ball” instead of waiting for it to arrive. Even with single coverage, Tyrell is inconsistent and will drop as many balls as he catches. His yards-per-catch-average is high – because his best catches are long bombs in busted coverage, which doesn’t happen often. He was expendable in SD/LA because he couldn’t jump up – nor “leap over” defenders to snatch the ball – despite his height. His competition, Mike Williams – the Chargers’ #1 draft choice from Clemson, did that last year and it dropped Tyrell on the depth chart.

    The commenter higher in this thread who described Tyrell as being “Malcom Floyd light” is right on. But at least Malcom consistently caught those long passes from Rivers. Speed gives you nothing if you can’t catch the ball at clutch time, and Tyrell didn’t inspire confidence from coaches and fans – because he was only great when he got separation from defenders. Which leads to….

    2) Learn to be a better route-runner! Tyrell’s weakness besides drops is not cutting nor being as agile with his entire body like Keenan Allen. Hence on mid-range routes, he had a tougher time getting open. Defenses knew this and they just made sure Tyrell stayed in front of them. Tyrell catches easy balls when he’s wide open, the balls you are never supposed to drop regardless. But in tight coverage, he’s inconsistent. His speed is his only trick on the field.

    Learn to run routes and he could “get open” in mid-range routes and catch balls all over the field like Keenan Allen and Mike Williams. Chargers already have a good receiving corps. Travis Benjamin, their #3 receiver – had a case of the drops early last season, but recovered with clutch catches and taking some big hits in tight coverage. Tyrell needs to toughen up more because he’s super tall and is as fast as a gazelle – but soft, not intimidating like Allen, Mike Williams and Benjamin.

    TL;DR – If he works on “chasing the ball” and running routes more precisely – Tyrell Williams could be a great addition – perhaps even an All-Pro.

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