Gronk’s retirement becomes a flashpoint in CTE debate

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Less than a week after Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski retired, rank speculation regarding the reasons for his departure from the game has become the latest skirmish in the fight between doctors who jump to conclusions regarding brain trauma and those who have preached patience.

Dr. Ann McKee, one of the leading CTE researchers, has pounced on Gronk’s retirement as proof that concerns regarding Chronic Traumatic Encephelopathy influence decisions regarding the duration of football careers.

I was relieved,” Dr, McKee told BU Today regarding her reaction to the news. “Reading between the lines about Rob Gronkowski, he’s had big hits. He’s read the headlines. He has said playing football abuses the body and abuses the brain.”

That quote from Dr. McKee prompted a response on Twitter from Dr. Peter Cummings, a forensic pathologist and a neuropathologist who like Dr. McKee works at Boston University and who points out that his colleague is taking liberties with Gronk’s quote, and that he never said anything about football abusing the brain: “Abusing your body isn’t what your brain wants. When your body is abused, it can bring down your mood.”

Here’s the full quote from Gronkowski, uttered days before what would be his final game: “The season’s a grind. It’s up and down. I’m not going to lie and sit here and say every week is the best. Not at all. You go up, you go down. You can take some serious hits. To tell you the truth, just try and imagine getting hit all the time and trying to be where you want to be every day in life. It’s tough, it’s difficult. To take hits to the thigh, take hits to your head. Abusing your body isn’t what your brain wants. When your body is abused, it can bring down your mood. You’ve got to be able to deal with that, too, throughout the season. You gotta be able to deal with that in the games.”

“I know he’s a goofball, but he’s intelligent,” Dr. McKee said of Gronkowski. “I think he does recognize that the brain is a very precious part of you, and you don’t get a second chance with it.”

Regardless of whether CTE fears were a factor in Gronk’s decision-making process (I’d heard over a year ago that family members were pushing Gronk to quit due to concussion concerns, possibly fear stoked by the likes of Dr. McKee), Dr. McKee believes that players have begun to consider CTE when deciding whether to call it quits.

“With the active players, there was this imaginary curtain — we’re not going to go there, not going to look at what might happen,” McKee said. “But now I do see players talking about CTE; they mention protecting their brain. And even if they don’t discuss CTE amongst themselves, they definitely are aware of it. They’re also getting more information from family members. CTE isn’t just a personal disease, it affects the whole family. Players talk to their wives, girlfriends, parents, and their level of concern is higher than it used to be.”

Of course it is, because of people like Ann McKee. That was precisely the point of last month’s article in The Lancet, one of the leading peer-reviewed medical journals.

“Unfortunately, the uncertainties around the clinical syndrome and the pathological definition of CTE are not acknowledged adequately in much of the current research literature or related media reporting, which at times has resembled science by press conference,” the article explained. “Too often an inaccurate impression is portrayed that CTE is clinically defined, its prevalence is high, and pathology evaluation is a simple positive or negative decision. This distorted reporting on CTE might have dire consequences. Specifically, individuals with potentially treatable conditions, such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder, might make decisions on their future on the basis of a misplaced belief that their symptoms inevitably herald an untreatable, degenerative brain disease culminating in dementia.”

The message is clear: Doctors (including Dr. Ann McKee) still don’t know nearly enough about how people get CTE, what it means to have CTE, and what can happen to someone who has CTE. Vague, dire warnings about CTE cause unnecessary fear and confusion, with former players worried that they have a ticking time bomb in their brain and current players possibly walking away prematurely due to a subject that remains in the infant stage of its overall research and understanding.

The Lancet specifically warned that the “uncertainties” regarding CTE are not “acknowledged adequately,” and that some are engaged in “science by press conference.” For Dr. McKee, this time around it appears to be science by sit-down interview, with an effort to use Gronk’s retirement decision as the latest billboard for convincing more Chris Borlands to quit football long before they otherwise would, regardless of whether the actual science of CTE supports such decisions.

74 responses to “Gronk’s retirement becomes a flashpoint in CTE debate

  1. Gronk has also had multiple back surgeries and a broken arm. It’s the way he played the game. He did have at least one concussion that we knew about. The man took a beating. For whatever reason, his HOF career is over and his fans love him and want to see what he does next. It’s just no reason for the CTE crowd to say, “told you so” on this one.

  2. Ok, where’s the beef? You’d have to be living under a rock to not consider the risk of brain trauma. So what football player doesn’t consider it?

  3. I think Gronk had back surgery in college which was why he dropped to the second round. I honestly just don’t think his body can do it anymore.

  4. CTE is real no doubt, and it obviously has been found in retired players. My question is how prevalent is it in people who have never played the game? My grandmother died of Alzheimers and had dementia before that. Did she have CTE? She was a housewife. There is more work to be done no doubt.

  5. I am with @BillyRayBob, not sure there is a story here. Plenty of players have left in the prime of late because of CTE concerns. Nothing new and probably smart too. And to pastabelly…yeah it should be about those beatings. He earned his keep. More than twice. Now…”CTE Crowd” yeah…some of us just care about these players. There is no CTE crowd.

  6. tylawspick6 says:

    The greatest TE…
    —————
    Gronk was good. But top 10 good in league history. Saying he was the greatest is homer speak. Gronk isnt even in the same conversation as Tony Gonzalez.

  7. Risk versus reward. Freedom of personal choice. Freedom to play a long time, freedom to stop playing altogether. Nobody is forcing these guys to play football, and none of them can say “I didn’t know!” Sorry, but beyond the unfortunate circumstance I can’t feel sorry for the ones that suffer and I don’t blame the ones that leave early. Life can be unfortunate. Just like all the rest of us, life is about decisions……..the ones you make, and the ones you don’t make. Policemen don’t say “I didn’t know the bad guys used guns!,” and you’ll never hear a firemen say “ There’s flames involved?” Do it or don’t do it, but don’t make it my problem.

  8. CTE is real…it has been verified by many medical studies…post mortem. Insurance companies do not want to cover CTE and place insurance riders of exclusion for same.This is going to be a very big problem for the NFL and all professional and college contact sports in the near future.Without insurance coverage for brain related trauma, sports organizations are not going to be able to incur such a high and explosive risk.

  9. Gronk is like Jim Brown. Brown retired because he could make more money in Hollywood, and didn’t have to beat up his body. The Great One is 83 years old and showing no signs of brain injury. His head took a much bigger pounding than Gronk’s, and the helmets in those days were inferior. Lots of older folks have brain issues, and most of them never stepped foot on a football field. Mike Ditka played tight end, and he’s the one that comes to mind when I watch Gronk. Same toughness. Ditka will turn 80 this year. He’s had a heart attack, but no brain issues. Cops get shot in the line of duty. It’s part of the risk. We need cops. The best thing to do is make their job safer and they’re doing that every day. I can’t imagine not having cops around because the job is too dangerous.

  10. That was an irresponsible thing to say on the part of the first doctor. While retiring saves Gronkowski from potential further brain injury, it’s VERY clear that it is the rest of his body that has suffered undeniable abuse. He has rarely been without some measure of pains, and as a very large man he knows that any injuries bad enough to linger for the rest of his life will be that much harder to live with as he ages. Bad back, bad knees, hips, etc could turn him into a stiff, lumbering guy, and he doesn’t want that. We shouldn’t forget that he was damaged even when he entered the league, so he’s walking away before the abuse goes too far.

  11. Meathead persona aside, Gronk is one of the smarter guys in the game. Certainly he’s looking at his bank account and investment portfolio and realizing he’s proven everything he needs to professionally and is set for life so why not cash out and start enjoying it? CTE or not, to quit abusing your body before you hit 30 when you’ve got multimillion stashed away is what any sensible man would do.

  12. David Copperfield is a magician says:
    March 30, 2019 at 10:17 am
    —————
    Gronk was good. But top 10 good in league history. Saying he was the greatest is homer speak. Gronk isnt even in the same conversation as Tony Gonzalez.
    ______________
    Blocking is also part of the position and Gronk was a far, far, far greater blocker (no debate) than you could say Gonzalez was as a receiver over Gronk (which is debatable)

  13. I didn’t mean to make light of CTE by saying the “CTE crowd”. I just don’t believe that Gronk’s early retirement related to CTE or his mental well being as it being his physical well being and him being able to walk as he ages.

  14. David Copperfield is a magician says:
    March 30, 2019 at 10:17 am
    tylawspick6 says:

    The greatest TE…
    —————
    Gronk was good. But top 10 good in league history. Saying he was the greatest is homer speak. Gronk isnt even in the same conversation as Tony Gonzalez.

    3 16 Rate This

    ————————

    gronk demolished gonzalez’s records years ago

    3 rings, the umtimate offensive chess piece

    he also is the greatest blocker at the position which gonzalez was pretty average at

    good day

  15. David Copperfield is a magician says:

    March 30, 2019 at 10:17 am

    tylawspick6 says:

    The greatest TE…
    —————
    Gronk was good. But top 10 good in league history. Saying he was the greatest is homer speak. Gronk isnt even in the same conversation as Tony Gonzalez.

    Gronk greater than Gonzalez, Gonzalez afraid to block, Gronk throw people out of club. Gronk is GOAT

  16. tylawspick6 says:
    March 30, 2019 at 10:41 am
    David Copperfield is a magician says:
    March 30, 2019 at 10:17 am

    gronk demolished gonzalez’s records years ago

    3 rings, the umtimate offensive chess piece

    he also is the greatest blocker at the position which gonzalez was pretty average at

    good day

    Gronk managed to play a FULL season only ONCE in his career. Manged to start more than 11 games three times in his career.

    Gonzalez 1325 rec 15,127 yds 11 TD

    Gronk 521 rec 7861 yds 76 TD

    So what records did Gronk SMASH?? Gronk is not only NOT the best TE ever, but he is behind Newsome, Winslow, Witten and Sharpe.

    Yes, Gronk was one of the better blocking TE, but he is nowhere near the best overall TE ever..

  17. David Copperfield is a magician says:
    March 30, 2019 at 10:17 am
    tylawspick6 says:

    The greatest TE…
    —————
    Gronk was good. But top 10 good in league history. Saying he was the greatest is homer speak. Gronk isnt even in the same conversation as Tony Gonzalez.

    ———-

    How many SB rings does Tony have again?

  18. who could blame him if that is the reason? and whatever the reason is, i wish him well. thank you for all the memories big guy. ill have that vision of gronk in sb LIII catching that seam pass between 2 guys in my mind forever.

  19. Regarding CTE in players who play now or have played in the past in the NFL, I always default to this criteria:
    1) Did they know the risks? The answer is ALWAYS a YES!
    2) Did they willingly volunteer to accept those risks in exchange for fame and fortune? Again, the answer is ALWAYS a YES!
    3) Did their union ever advise them to NOT play due to the risks, physical, mental, and financial? No, the union abhors anything that would actually protect a player from his own choices.

  20. They need to find a way to test living brains to get a better handle on the nature and risks of CTE. Diagnosis via autopsy doesn’t help the patient or help understand it’s progression. Not a doctor, but it’s hard to understand why they can biopsy or otherwise examine living tissue, or use CAT scans to diagnose soft tissue anomalies, but not CTE.

  21. I think we can all be reasonably certain that long term health played a role in his decision. And it helps that Gronk, with his larger than life personality, will have plenty of endorsement opportunities for some years to follow, although a Hollywood career remains highly questionable at this time.

  22. SWFLPC.INC says:
    March 30, 2019 at 11:21 am
    David Copperfield is a magician says:
    March 30, 2019 at 10:17 am

    ———-

    How many SB rings does Tony have again?
    ——————————————-

    How many Super Bowl rings do Dan Marino, Jim Kelly and Dan Fouts have? Barry Sanders? OJ Simpson? I guess they are not all time greats?

    Conversely, Jim Plunkett and Eli have a pair of rings. Trent Dilfer, Joe Flacco and Nick Foles all have one, are they some of the “Best ever”

    People who argue Super Bowl rings as a measuring stick for how great a player is tell me all I need to know.

  23. fishfan77 says:
    March 30, 2019 at 10:53 am
    Gronk is not only NOT the best TE ever, but he is behind Newsome, Winslow, Witten and Sharpe
    ——————————————

    Putting an oversized WR like Sharpe in the best TE conversation with names like Newsome, Winslow and Gronk shows a profound lack of understanding for what makes up a complete TE. There’s a lot more to it than receiving stats.

  24. Anyone that argues that Gronk is not in the conversation as the best TE ever are in the VAST minority. Using only numbers is fairly meaningless, since Gronk’s career was way shorter than the other candidates. By choice, not because he couldn’t play anymore. There are no numbers for blocking(outside of PFF), and no adjustments for glorified WRs that didn’t really play the TE position(SSharp).

  25. @dryzzt23 says:
    March 30, 2019 at 11:26 am
    Regarding CTE in players who play now or have played in the past in the NFL, I always default to this criteria:
    1) Did they know the risks? The answer is ALWAYS a YES!
    2) Did they willingly volunteer to accept those risks in exchange for fame and fortune? Again, the answer is ALWAYS a YES!
    3) Did their union ever advise them to NOT play due to the risks, physical, mental, and financial? No, the union abhors anything that would actually protect a player from his own choices.
    ————————————-
    No, no, and no! Especially regarding the older players. They knew they were risking backs, knees, shoulders and ankles, but NOT brains. I have to wonder how many former players you actually know and are aware of the impact on their lives and the lives of their families. Sadly, I know many who’ve been affected and thankfully many who are doing well, but NO ONE asks for brain damage.

    Until Mike Webster’s autopsy, very few people were paying attention and guys who are striving to learn 6-inch thick playbooks and develop their physical skills don’t generally spend time digging through medical libraries for something they were even aware was a problem.

    I sustained a major concussion with brief loss of consciousness when I was 8-years old, back in 1970. I also injured my back in the fall, but I do not recall a doctor, or my parents or anyone expressing concern about my brain and any long-term affects–they were worried about my back, which healed in a couple of weeks. My brain didn’t heal so quickly. Prior to that time I’d been an outgoing, normal kid, and afterward, I found myself consumed with depression and suicidal thoughts that persisted for more than 2 years. And the adults just told me to stop feeling sorry for myself–there was nothing wrong with me. If this is how a concussed child was treated in the 1970s, then why would anyone feel football players were treated any differently?

  26. Gonzales played 8 more years than Gronk , hence more yardage and catches. Yet just a small percentage of the tds Gronk had, go figure. Gronk was money Gonzales small change.

  27. HE missed the 2009 arizona football season due to a back injury
    he also was bernard pollard in the 2011 AFCCG.
    Smashed his head on a wicked good touchdown against the chiefs in 2011 going into the end zone.
    broke his arm on an extra point
    had an infection
    had his knee blown out in 2015
    sprained his knee in 2015 against Denver, when it looked like his season was over
    had back problems in 2016 and went on IR

    sounds like a lot more than CTE.

  28. fishfan77 says:
    March 30, 2019 at 11:46 am
    SWFLPC.INC says:
    March 30, 2019 at 11:21 am
    David Copperfield is a magician says:
    March 30, 2019 at 10:17 am

    ———-

    How many SB rings does Tony have again?
    ——————————————-

    How many Super Bowl rings do Dan Marino, Jim Kelly and Dan Fouts have? Barry Sanders? OJ Simpson? I guess they are not all time greats?

    Conversely, Jim Plunkett and Eli have a pair of rings. Trent Dilfer, Joe Flacco and Nick Foles all have one, are they some of the “Best ever”

    People who argue Super Bowl rings as a measuring stick for how great a player is tell me all I need to know.

    ———

    SBs are certainly not the entire measure but they are a big factor. That’s why nobody would argue that Jim Kelley or Dan Marino are the “best ever” at their positions. Moreover, without the SB wins, there is no way guys like Terrell Davis and Kurt Warner even sniff the HOF

  29. The amount that modern players make, with singing bonuses and so on, makes it easier to walk away from the game. Most rookies make more money playing just one year to equal what many folks will make for their entire life time.

  30. I thought this was going to be about how he tried to give another player a concussion after the play was over, because he was just so frustrated about having his jersey grabbed in a game the Patriots were winning by 3 scores.

    Dirtiest play I’ve seen in years. Not sure why this guy keeps getting referred to as a “class act.”

  31. Knowing what CTE did to his old teammate, Hernandez, probably brought reality home, as well.

    Gronk will be the best TE to ever play the game. I love what he did for my team, but I am really happy—for him—to see him go at this point.

    People that don’t see how smart he is, fell right into his trap!

  32. So Gronk is saying getting hit by grown men at high sppeds hurts your body? Thanks for the update. And work a regular 40 hour week job Gronk forba year then complain.

  33. Gronk worked hard to have a hall of fame career, injuries have derailed many greats but he fought thru it all till the end. this is a game for men you know what you are getting into plain and simple.

  34. There is a risk of injury in playing any sport. The players accept the risk and agree to play. Since when is it a requirement to live a life without risk?

  35. How many Super Bowl rings do Dan Marino, Jim Kelly and Dan Fouts have? Barry Sanders? OJ Simpson? I guess they are not all time greats?

    Conversely, Jim Plunkett and Eli have a pair of rings. Trent Dilfer, Joe Flacco and Nick Foles all have one, are they some of the “Best ever”

    ===================================================================================

    Jim Plunkett is a better quarterback than Jim Kelly and Dan Fouts. A good player does best in the biggest games, while some players fatten their stats in meaningless games. OJ did little in playoff games. Nick Foles is a better quarterback than any quarterback who has never won a Super Bowl or NFL championship.

  36. Dirtiest play huh.. You must not watch alot of football. Josh Norman VS OBJ.. Vontaze Burrfict almost every game.. Denver VS Cam Newton.. Hines wards blindside shots..etc etc.. Quit acting as if that was the dirtiest play ever, unsportsman like yes. I even seen an Oline man take a blindside hit so brutal it dislocated his hip. Game action you will scream and I will counter with rule changes. No hitting defenseless players, no leading with the helmet, no blindside hits, No hitting the head period.

    Gronk retired because he could and live very comfortable.Every football player that has had concussions does not get cte.. Just like every boxer doesn’t. I wonder who gets hit in the head more? Gets knocked out more? Have to wait on the movie I guess.. That will explain it all.

  37. Well if he retires and is concerned about CTE I guess Tre’Davisous White is safe now, or at least safe from contracting further CTE from a cheap Gronk hit

  38. For all the players who say super bowl rings are the measure of how good you are…. who you choosing in their prime Barry Sanders or jay ajayi? It’s sanders every time. Last I checked 22 people plus special teams line up in a football game. The amount of Super Bowls you have has nothing to do with how good you are as an individual player. Trent silver won a SB for god sakes!

    That being said, Gronk is definitely in the top…. one of the best blockers and outlets for Brady. But would he have 3 rings if not for Brady and Belichek? What if he was drafted by say the Browns?

  39. Troy airman has 3 rings who thinks he is one of the all time greats? I think he was good and benefited greatly from having arguably the best offensive line to play together and Smith and Irving.

  40. Good article, guys. Your earlier article concerning the…oversensitive crowd in the medical community was actually the first thing I thought of when I saw Gronk’s quote. I thought to myself that someone-medical professional or not-was going to jump on that quickly.

    Of course, to be clear, CTE is not something that should be taken lightly. I do not doubt that you at PFT are suggesting that, and neither am I. But I agree completely with your cautioning on the issue, or at least your effort to draw attention to that. It is a dangerous condition whose prevalence has been overexaggerated, and whose complete effects require more time and study to be fully understood. Unfortunately, we’ve only recently begun to take this issue as seriously as we should have, so it will take time to know what CTE totally is. But that’s no reason to expand its reach beyond what is known definitively.

  41. David Copperfield is a magician says:
    March 30, 2019 at 10:17 am
    tylawspick6 says:

    The greatest TE…
    —————
    Gronk was good. But top 10 good in league history. Saying he was the greatest is homer speak. Gronk isnt even in the same conversation as Tony Gonzalez.
    ===========
    This can’t actually be a real thought, I hope. Let’s break them down and compare them at the two things a TE does. Using a 1-10 scale with 10 being the best
    Receiving ability:
    Gonzalez-10
    Gronkowski-9

    Blocking in the run game
    Gonzalez- 3
    Gronkowski- 10

    You are right, they aren’t in the same conversation, but not for the reasons you thought

  42. CTE is the left’s version of climate change. The Left has to infest and destroy and CTE is the vehicle it has decided to use against the NFL.

  43. “Receiving ability:
    Gonzalez-10
    Gronkowski-9

    Blocking in the run game
    Gonzalez- 3
    Gronkowski- 10”

    —–

    Alright, look, Gronk’s great, but what scale are you using here?

  44. The fact that he vetoed a trade to the Lions last year is all the proof you need that his brain is working just fine.

  45. Averages per game:
    Gronk: 4.53 rec, 68.36 yds, 0.66 td, 15.1 avg per catch
    Gonzalez: 4.91 rec, 56.03 yds, 0.41 td, 11.4 avg per catch

    So, getting an extra 0.4 rec per game on dump offs makes Gonzalez a better receiver? Stats don’t lie people: Gronk > Gonzalez

  46. CTE is the left’s version of climate change. The Left has to infest and destroy and CTE is the vehicle it has decided to use against the NFL.

    If you donate your brain to medical science, I think it could be a huge contribution to the research.

  47. Sheilla Dingus says:
    March 30, 2019 at 11:59 am

    I sustained a major concussion with brief loss of consciousness when I was 8-years old, back in 1970. I also injured my back in the fall, but I do not recall a doctor, or my parents or anyone expressing concern about my brain and any long-term affects–they were worried about my back, which healed in a couple of weeks. My brain didn’t heal so quickly. Prior to that time I’d been an outgoing, normal kid, and afterward, I found myself consumed with depression and suicidal thoughts that persisted for more than 2 years. And the adults just told me to stop feeling sorry for myself–there was nothing wrong with me. If this is how a concussed child was treated in the 1970s, then why would anyone feel football players were treated any differently?
    ++++++++++++

    Puh-Leeeeze. Some people just gotta be the victim.

  48. The debate (chuckle). As if there was a real debate. The doctor was asked for her reaction and she paraphrased Gronk’s quotes in defining her relief. She felt thigh referred to body and head referred to brain. Some snowflake had a meltdown on twitter. Happens all the time.

  49. Does any team fear the Pats passing attack next season?

    As a Bills fan, Gronk was terrifying.. I know NE has made do with some very lean resources, but now we’ll have a 42 year old QB, and his greatest weapon will be a 33 year old slot guy.

    Calling it – this dynasty is part of our past.

  50. McKee just wants her name in the papers. Players in 2019 are well aware of the potential risks of brain injuries. Most of them choose to play anyway because their chances of making the same kind of money elsewhere are next to zero. The real threat to the game is not adult men retiring “early”. It’s kids not playing the game at all because of the brain injury risks. Over a couple generations this poses great risk to the NFL not having a big enough pool of players to choose from.

  51. David Copperfield is a magician says:
    March 30, 2019 at 10:17 am
    tylawspick6 says:

    The greatest TE…
    —————
    Gronk was good. But top 10 good in league history. Saying he was the greatest is homer speak. Gronk isnt even in the same conversation as Tony Gonzalez.
    ______________________________________________________________________

    Tony Gonzalez was a good receiving TE. Nothing more. He didn’t do most of the work a TE is supposed to do. Gronk is an all around TE, great blocker both at the line and in space, great receiving TE and better YAC than Gonzalez. Tony played in games, Gronk changed games. Even this year, when his body was clearly not doing well, we was used as a blocker to great effect and defenses HAD to respect his routes at the same time. Not so with Tony. You are right about one thing, they aren’t even in the same conversation. Gronk is the best TE of the modern era. Nobody even close.

  52. Is it really far fetched to think taking football hits has a negative long term effect on your brain? No.

    Is it really far fetched that athletes are willing to risk their long term health for the absolutely glory of professional sport? No.

  53. Funny how Pats fans use the number of SB rings Grink has (3) as a basis of greatness but downgrade Lynn Swanns 9 yr career w/ MORE rings (4).

  54. Gonzalez was great at what he did, catch the ball. Deion sanders was great at what he did, cover someone. However, football is a game where you have to do other things. Like block or tackle. Gonzalez blocking was like Deion tackling, not so good.

  55. Everyone who says that players know and accept the risks is missing the point of the concern about CTE: we DON’T know all of the risks. While there isn’t enough research to say conclusively that football damages the brain more than everyday living, researchers are starting to realize there might be a correlation. Until that is completely understood, the risks will not be known. When the NFL makes statements on this we need to treat them like statements made by tobacco companies concerning smoking. It’s in their best interest to downplay all concerns for legal and participation reasons.

  56. ariani1985 says:
    March 30, 2019 at 10:35 am
    2 yard Tom has a lot to do with the bad passes.

    —-

    Ya—what has he ever done that was good? Clearly a huge problem.

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