AAF players finally receive authorization to sign with NFL teams

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The NFL had instructed all teams to not sign AAF players. NFL teams can now sign AAF players.

The AAF has announced via its Twitter account that players officially have the ability to sign with NFL teams.

The standard AAF three-year contracts included a provision allowing players to exit for NFL opportunities at the conclusion of an AAF season. Although the AAF’s season as a practical matter concluded when it suspended operations, the NFL opted to wait until official documentation was obtained authorizing NFL teams to sign AAF players.

It’s smart business by the NFL. Any other approach would create potential liability for tortious interference with business interests.

 

31 responses to “AAF players finally receive authorization to sign with NFL teams

  1. Hope it works out that several players get a look or signed as a result of the exposure/development.

  2. Garrett Gilbert at least showed he deserves a shot at a roster spot somewhere. Christian Hackenberg… uh… not so much…

  3. “It’s smart business by the NFL. Any other approach would create potential liability for tortious interference with business interests.”
    __________________

    The contracts were between the players and the AAF. The players would have been risking losing any future pay owed them if they broke the agreement. But the NFL was never a party to those contracts so they were always free to do whatever they wanted.

  4. 24thusernameused says:
    April 4, 2019 at 1:41 pm

    tortious, Florio… seriously?!?! Leave the lawyer crap behind when tryin’ to talk to football folks brah!

    ————————————-

    Tortious? Torturous.

  5. mogogo1 says:
    April 4, 2019 at 1:44 pm
    “It’s smart business by the NFL. Any other approach would create potential liability for tortious interference with business interests.”
    __________________

    The contracts were between the players and the AAF. The players would have been risking losing any future pay owed them if they broke the agreement. But the NFL was never a party to those contracts so they were always free to do whatever they wanted.
    ————————-

    As a lawyer I can tell you’re wrong. Tortious interference is when one person intentionally damages someone else’s contractual or business relationships with a third party causing economic harm. In this case the NFL would be the one interfering by enticing the player to break the agreement.

  6. mogogo1 says:
    April 4, 2019 at 1:44 pm
    “It’s smart business by the NFL. Any other approach would create potential liability for tortious interference with business interests.”
    __________________

    The contracts were between the players and the AAF. The players would have been risking losing any future pay owed them if they broke the agreement. But the NFL was never a party to those contracts so they were always free to do whatever they wanted.

    ————————

    Not always true. I haven’t read the contracts but they can have wording about outside interference much like a NFL player and his team have a contract with each other but don’t allow other parties to conduct business that might be considered tampering. High execs have this in their contracts all the time.

  7. tvguy22 says:
    April 4, 2019 at 2:12 pm
    24thusernameused says:
    April 4, 2019 at 1:41 pm

    tortious, Florio… seriously?!?! Leave the lawyer crap behind when tryin’ to talk to football folks brah!

    ————————————-

    Tortious? Torturous.

    ——–

    He used “tortious” intentionally.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tortious_interference

  8. I just don’t understand how the AAF could so badly screw up the business model. How do you get yourself to a point where you need a $250 million investment commitment to finish the year? How do you get to needing $20m in cashflow to make payroll for the year? I am curious as to what happened. Did TV revenue not meet expectations? Were expenses badly underestimated? Because in the absence of an autopsy, I’ve got to say this thing feels like they just started a league and had no long-term plan. It’s like the whole thing just ran week to week and their only goal was to get through the season, go to bed, and hope the sun came up in the morning (Mission: Failed).

  9. Who is actually going to make it in the NFL? There was some quality play, but not full NFL quality.
    The good players were like how they tag baseball players as Quadruple A players. Too good for Triple A, not good enough for the Majors. Same goes with the good AAF players. They might have been too good for the AAF but they aren’t good enough for the NFL

  10. The CFL has already started signing players from the AAF, will be slim pickings for the NFL. But, we all know one player that won’t be going North! Does the NFL want Johnny Football back? Cmon Cleveland, re sign him as a back up to Baker!

  11. rpw84 says:
    April 4, 2019 at 3:25 pm
    The CFL has already started signing players from the AAF, will be slim pickings for the NFL. But, we all know one player that won’t be going North! Does the NFL want Johnny Football back? Cmon Cleveland, re sign him as a back up to Baker!

    yeah right, you must be a bigger crackhead than johnny 8ball to actually think the browns are gonna want him again? come on man, get real or sink faster than the frikin titanic.

  12. I know nothing excites you guys like kickers, but truthfully there was some great kicking in the AAF. Would not be surprised to see some of those legs get a call.

  13. Ja’Quan Gardner should get a spot on training camp. He’s a bit undersized but could make a great change of pace back in the NFL.

  14. If there are any 2 players who have earned another shot at an NFL roster spot after their performances in the AAF it’s Garret Gilbert and Charles Johnson imo.

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