Adrian Peterson wanted to turn pro after his freshman year

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As a true freshman at Oklahoma in 2004, Adrian Peterson ran for 1,925 yards and finished second in Heisman Trophy voting. At that time, he was ready for the NFL.

But the NFL wasn’t ready for him. League rules say a player must be three years out of high school before he can play in the NFL. Peterson, however, says he was keenly aware that Maurice Clarett had sued for the right to get into the 2004 NFL draft, and he says that he was rooting for Clarett and ready to turn pro himself if Clarett had won.

“I can tell you, when that situation happened with Maurice Clarett, I was elated,” Peterson told SI.com. “I was like, ‘Yes, thank you Jesus,’ because I just knew that was the route I was going to take, and I would have taken it. Think about the type of year I had my freshman year [at Oklahoma]. Come on. Like, I’m out of there. I’m in the NFL already.”

Peterson still believes he would have been a higher pick in the 2005 NFL draft, after his freshman year, than he ended up being the seventh overall pick. He’s almost certainly right about that: In 2005 running back Ronnie Brown went second overall, Cedric Benson went fourth and Cadillac Williams went fifth. It’s hard to believe NFL teams wouldn’t have seen Peterson as a better prospect than at least one of those three.

“The one guy I used as an example was Cedric Benson,” Peterson said. “He was a senior my freshman year, and I out-performed him that year, so I was just like, If he could go play in the NFL, why couldn’t I? He went [fourth] overall, and you’ve got a guy that’s younger, with less wear and tear on his body. Where do you put me if he went [fourth]?”

The NFL rule doesn’t appear to be going away. But it’s a bad deal for players like Peterson, and like Clemson freshman quarterback Trevor Lawrence, who might be the first overall pick in this month’s draft if he were eligible. The NFL rule cost Peterson millions of dollars, and he’s justified in still being bothered by that.

66 responses to “Adrian Peterson wanted to turn pro after his freshman year

  1. Well I am still bothered that I had to stay in college, take out those loans, and graduate before I could “turn pro” into the working world. You see, my choice for careers required a full college degree, not just be three years out of high school. Jobs have minimum requirements, that’s just the way life works, whether we like it or not.

  2. conormacleod says:
    April 9, 2019 at 9:01 am
    Well I am still bothered that I had to stay in college, take out those loans, and graduate before I could “turn pro” into the working world. You see, my choice for careers required a full college degree, not just be three years out of high school. Jobs have minimum requirements, that’s just the way life works, whether we like it or not.

    ————

    Shut up dude. Your situations aren’t even in the same stratosphere much less even remotely comparable.

    And while I am no fan of AP (seriously, he’s a POS), he is right on this. It’s dumb to not let them come when they’re ready. They should at least allow players to petition for an exception to that rule when a freshmen has a season like AP had, or like Lawrence had. Then NFL is depriving themselves of these players, who could get hurt at any moment.

  3. He wanted to get into the league as fast as he could to start cashing paychecks because he had the foresight to know he’d have a slew of children with numerous women who would all be holding their hands out for child support payments. And to think a big box of condoms goes for $17.

  4. conormacleod says:
    April 9, 2019 at 9:01 am
    Well I am still bothered that I had to stay in college, take out those loans, and graduate before I could “turn pro” into the working world. You see, my choice for careers required a full college degree, not just be three years out of high school. Jobs have minimum requirements, that’s just the way life works, whether we like it or not.

    Aren’t you a cop? Last I checked that didn’t require a four year degree

  5. doe22us says:

    April 9, 2019 at 8:58 am

    Lost in all of this are the RB’s that got picked ahead of him wow lol.. Cedric Benson lol…
    ——
    It seems what got lost is you understanding they were 2 different drafts. No rb was picked before Peterson in his draft and the only other back picked in the 1st round that year was Marshawn Lynch.

  6. But would that have given his coach and university enough time to exploit his free labor for millions?

  7. he got robbed out of the Heisman because he was a freshman yet they gave it to johnny, excuse me john manziel…foh

  8. Overall, it’s a good rule. Most guys need more time to grow physically and mentally. Peterson has shown time and time again that he is the exception to the rule. That doesn’t mean it should be changed. No one feels bad for Peterson, except I guess MDS. Peterson has made plenty of money over his career.

  9. Gotta love the 2 faced hypocrites in the media. One day football is so dangerous the end is near because parents won`t let their kids play anymore and the next football is bad because they won`t let teenagers come in and get battered. Stop trying to solve problems for the 1 percent and look at the big picture.

  10. for every peterson there will be numerous maurice claretts. guys who think theyre ready but inevitably prove they are not. teams dont want to draft and pay millions to guys who arent ready. excuse the NFL teams for protecting their money, and wanting guys to show they are worth it through multiple years of college

  11. Stop. What you are saying here is that Adrian Peterson is rightfully mad that he was by rule prevented from becoming, as he said, a “modern day slave”.

    The college athletes must be paid argument is tiring. Peterson made a commitment to his college. He agreed to play football and receive a free-ride while he makes a name for himself (and the program). The rules in place at the time meant he would be there multiple years. Do you honestly think all these athletes would get a completely free ride if they had the ability to leave and said they were going to leave after only one year? Do you think Peterson would have been drafted on his high school resume? Without that college season he is a nobody. No name recognition, no national exposure, no stats. He has no courage. Did he step up and try to make that change? Nope. He hid in the front and hoped the other guy who risked his career might win so HE can profit. Weak.

  12. Why don’t you spend your time complaining about the age limit for the US presidency? Or the age limit for drinking alcohol. Those are also arbitrary, so you should spend as much time whining about them.

  13. Lol…like this is some big revelation. Of course he wanted to retire from his student career. He had no future MANAGING people. He can’t even manage his own household unless there’s a belt handy. The only thing he’s ever gonna manage is his fantasy football team. And even that will take him some time.

  14. He and any other players should be able to make that choice himself. I have yet to hear a good argument otherwise. We have too many in this country that want to make your life choices for you and it is really sad. Stop with your holier than thou we now what is best for you attitude and allow people to choose for themselves.

  15. AP was one of the few humans who could have actually been good coming out after his Freshman year. Why anyone feels the need to stop adults from trying to do something professionally is beyond me. 99% of these guys who try after their Freshman year would fail. However, having a rule that doesn’t allow them to is wack. Both the NFL execs and the players union are responsible for this. It is obvious it is to protect a free farm system and protecting existing job. It has nothing to do with protecting the players.

  16. terrystown says:
    April 9, 2019 at 9:21 am
    Overall, it’s a good rule. Most guys need more time to grow physically and mentally. Peterson has shown time and time again that he is the exception to the rule. That doesn’t mean it should be changed. No one feels bad for Peterson, except I guess MDS. Peterson has made plenty of money over his career.
    _____
    No. It’s a paternalistic rule. If a person is considered an adult at 18 with the ability to join the military or police force then this rule makes zero sense. Yes we will take you into a physically and mentally stressful occupation like the army but ohs nos not the NFL. That is a a more physical and mentally tough occupation. 🙄

  17. But then there’s the aspect of mentally growing up to prepare you for the NFL. Adrian never quite figured that out,,,,,and still hasn’t. A mental giant, he’s not!

  18. Colleges take a risk on giving these guys scholarships and a roster spot on their team. Each player like AP represents a significant investment.
    Colleges are not going to take that risk if they can’t get a return.
    Allowing a player to leave for the NFL any sooner than they now can would put a foolish level of risk on the very foundation the NFL is built on, i.e. the NCAA.

    Besides, there is life after football, so the excellent education these athletes receive will stand them in good stead post-NFL. Our nation needs well educated ex-NFL players.

  19. ……..and Viking fans put their myopic glasses focused on Rodgers. Rodgers…….the consummate team-player, teammate, who handles himself quietly and professionally, a guy most players should be trying to emulate, and Viking fans prefer their Golden Calf Peterson. Unreal.

  20. Blah blah blah Florio. Did you ever think maybe the NFL rule on when you are draft eligible may be a good thing to protect the players from themselves? Maybe some of the players actually do graduate and have careers after the NFL is done with them. When a scum bag agent is waving money in the face of these kids what do you think they will do?

  21. BuckyBadger says:
    April 9, 2019 at 9:44 am
    He and any other players should be able to make that choice himself. I have yet to hear a good argument otherwise. We have too many in this country that want to make your life choices for you and it is really sad. Stop with your holier than thou we now what is best for you attitude and allow people to choose for themselves.
    ————————-

    Does that same freedom of choice extend to the NFL team owners in their ability to set minimum job requirements for it’s players?

  22. Guys like him are the single best argument for abolishing the 2 years rule. There aren’t many guys ready to turn pro out of high school, but AD was.

  23. While I think AD could have done it, he is the exception rather than the rule. I don’t think the NBA is doing well paying for potential. Kobe and KG came off the bench for 2 years. And they were a couple of the NBA success stories for going straight into the league from HS.The NBA is a garbage game today and watching On the Job Training hasn’t helped it. I like the NFL’s way of doing things better.

  24. From complaining about his draft day to disciplining his kids, does anyone live in the past quite like AP?

  25. And 10 years after he was drafted by the vikings, he still had dreams of one day going somewhere that had a professional football team.

  26. tonyzendejas says:
    April 9, 2019 at 10:40 am
    From complaining about his draft day to disciplining his kids, does anyone live in the past quite like AP?

    ————-

    Yeah, Packers fans. And Vikings fans aren’t too far behind them.

  27. conormacleod says:
    April 9, 2019 at 9:01 am
    Well I am still bothered that I had to stay in college, take out those loans, and graduate before I could “turn pro” into the working world. You see, my choice for careers required a full college degree, not just be three years out of high school. Jobs have minimum requirements, that’s just the way life works, whether we like it or not.

    ————————

    Clearly didn’t get much out of that degree with this logic.

  28. BuckyBadger says:
    April 9, 2019 at 9:44 am
    He and any other players should be able to make that choice himself. I have yet to hear a good argument otherwise. We have too many in this country that want to make your life choices for you and it is really sad. Stop with your holier than thou we now what is best for you attitude and allow people to choose for themselves.
    —————————

    That’s an interesting take from someone who wants the government to control every aspect of our lives.

  29. The real issue here is the discrepancy in market value witnessed at the college level and at the pro level in regards to rookie contracts. Let the free market prevail; stop intervening with rules and let rookies of any age negotiate their contracts freely.

    Can somebody tell me what the problem is with free market contract negotiation?

  30. Man, you know NFL material is scarce when you have a story on a player going into his 13th season talking about how he wanted to turn pro after his freshman year in college in 2004.
    The draft just can’t get here soon enough.

    Peterson, you will be in the HOF someday – playing for an inferior franchise won’t hurt your HOF chances. With that said, enough with the “could have should have” argument. You have made many millions and the past has already been written.

  31. atthemurph says:
    April 9, 2019 at 10:15 am
    BuckyBadger says:
    April 9, 2019 at 9:44 am
    He and any other players should be able to make that choice himself. I have yet to hear a good argument otherwise. We have too many in this country that want to make your life choices for you and it is really sad. Stop with your holier than thou we now what is best for you attitude and allow people to choose for themselves.
    ————————-

    Does that same freedom of choice extend to the NFL team owners in their ability to set minimum job requirements for it’s players?

    —————–

    As long as you don’t discriminate by age unless there is an equal league to play in. We have rights you know. If an owner doesn’t want to draft that player than don’t do it. You don’t need a rule so no one can. That is just ridiculous, stop pretending you know what is best for everyone.

  32. And for every exception to the rule like AP….there would be dozens and dozens of kids who would try and fail without the benefit from an education and further development.

    Keep the rule. If there’s a couple of unicorns every 10 years or so who could have made the jump and were prevented…that pales in comparison to the many careers it would harm by trying and failing.

  33. There are few that are physically gifted enough to make the jump to playing with grown men. There are fewer still that are mentally and emotionally ready for that leap.

    Keep the rule.

  34. “As long as you don’t discriminate by age unless there is an equal league to play in. We have rights you know.”
    ———————————————
    Rights! Haha. Another person who has no idea what “rights” are.
    The NFL is a private business, and as such they can make whatever rules and regulations they want. They are not violating anyone’s “rights” if they decide to implement an age requirement.

  35. MyNameJuan says:
    April 9, 2019 at 9:51 am
    Colleges take a risk on giving these guys scholarships and a roster spot on their team. Each player like AP represents a significant investment.
    Colleges are not going to take that risk if they can’t get a return.
    Allowing a player to leave for the NFL any sooner than they now can would put a foolish level of risk on the very foundation the NFL is built on, i.e. the NCAA.
    Besides, there is life after football, so the excellent education these athletes receive will stand them in good stead post-NFL. Our nation needs well educated ex-NFL players.
    **************************************************************

    This is almost laughable, but so far from reality that I can’t fathom anyone would believe it.

    #1 — There is ZERO risk being taken by Division I football programs when giving scholarships to players. Adding 85 students to any campus is barely a cost at all, and the revenue generated by the football teams is tremendous. For example, see the info below from an article USA Today did on the money generated. Notice that 45 smaller schools got paid at least $1 million to play a road game against a larger program.
    Liberty… hardly a college power… paid Old Dominion $1.32 million to play them!
    Even if a few players leave for the NFL early, it doesn’t matter. NCAA schools have a base of alumni who will still show up and fill stadiums, and the TV contracts will still pay them significant money.

    From USA Today article:
    “This season, well over $175 million will change hands just for teams getting on the field for these so-called “guarantee” games, according to an analysis of more than 275 contracts for matchups involving teams in the NCAA’s top-level Bowl Subdivision.
    While some of these agreements involve series of games on equal and relatively modest terms, the real money is elsewhere.
    It’s in about a dozen contests at off-campus sites, like the weekend’s featured matchups: No. 6-ranked Washington vs. No. 10 Auburn on Saturday at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, and No. 8 Miami (Fla.) vs. No. 24 LSU at AT&T Stadium on Sunday night in Arlington, Texas. Those games will provide the participating schools a combined total of more than $50 million in appearance fees that come with strings, including a need to sell tens of thousands of tickets schools agree to purchase from third-party organizers.

    Meanwhile, millions more will come directly from the schools with the wealthiest athletics departments. In at least 45 instances this season, one of those schools will pay at least $1 million to a lower-scale opponent while aiming to fill vast stadiums and — at least theoretically — get an impressive victory with minimal risk of defeat. Then there is Liberty, which is paying Old Dominion $1.32 million to play a game Saturday in Lynchburg, Va., that will be its first as an FBS school.
    More than 15 games this season will give the visiting team at least $1.4 million.”

    ———————————————————-

    #2 — The EASY solution to the problem is to copy the NHL way of handling draft picks, with a little modification. For college NCAA players that have been drafted, NHL teams retain their rights until 30 days after the player has left college. NHL drafted players continue to play NCAA hockey prior to signing a contract. And… the NCAA is not losing any money when players leave for the NHL whenever they are ready.

    If the NFL allowed teams to draft players at any time after high school (if player declares for early entry), and then hold their rights until 1 year after they leave college, the problem is fixed. As long as the player doesn’t hire an agent or take money from endorsements, he would retain his amateur status and continue to eligible for NCAA football. This would allow the NFL teams to communicate to the player when they believe he is physically ready to play in the NFL, would protect the player from himself. The NFL teams would not want to “rush” the player too early, because it would “start the clock” on when that player would be eligible for free agency. However, the player would also have some control of the situation to protect his interest, because the player can choose to leave school and “start the clock” on the year that the team retains his rights. The team would then need to decide to keep that player on the roster, or risk losing his rights after 1 year.

    For players that declare and don’t get drafted (and aren’t signed as UDFA), they should be able to continue to play NCAA football (assuming no agent hired) until their eligibility is up. After exhausting college eligibity, if the player has not been drafted at any time, they would be an UDFA just like the system works today.

    This is the fix that would benefit the kids more than the current system, but the NFL and NCAA really aren’t interested in that. They BOTH want to continue the status quo because they know it pays remarkably well. And if it isn’t broke, they won’t fix it.

    ***************************************************************
    ***************************************************************

    #3 — The education argument? Really?

    Let’s get real. There are certainly some players that take advantage of the time in school and get a degree. There are also MANY players that show up to class and do just enough to stay eligible to play football. You can’t force an education on someone who does not want it, whether you make them go to class or not.

    Not only that, but Division I athletes have so much time required to be on the practice field, in the weight room, and traveling to games… many of them can’t take more than 12 credit per semester.
    At 12 hours per semester, they would need at least 5 years to graduate.
    If they don’t redshirt, the 4 year scholarship may not be long enough to get many of the kids a degree… including those who don’t have the ability to play in the NFL.

    And… if the NCAA cared about educating the kids, they wouldn’t void their eligibility in those circumstances when a player declares for the draft (and doesn’t hire agent), but doesn’t get drafted.

  36. conormacleod says:
    April 9, 2019 at 9:01 am
    Well I am still bothered that I had to stay in college, take out those loans, and graduate before I could “turn pro” into the working world. You see, my choice for careers required a full college degree, not just be three years out of high school. Jobs have minimum requirements, that’s just the way life works, whether we like it or not

    —-

    Look, a player being able to go right form high school to the NFL and have success is the extreme exception to the rule…. With that said, your comment is hardley relevant.

    Athletics are completely different than any other career field.

    With that said-If for some reason you were some high level engineering or computer science prodigy right out of high school who had a complete mastery of the field with no college who was well known across the country in his field and expected to not only seamlessly transition into the professional world, but instantly be one of the top people in your field- you would have job offers.

  37. savethebs says:
    April 9, 2019 at 9:08 am
    conormacleod says:
    April 9, 2019 at 9:01 am
    Well I am still bothered that I had to stay in college, take out those loans, and graduate before I could “turn pro” into the working world. You see, my choice for careers required a full college degree, not just be three years out of high school. Jobs have minimum requirements, that’s just the way life works, whether we like it or not.

    ————

    Shut up dude. Your situations aren’t even in the same stratosphere much less even remotely comparable.

    And while I am no fan of AP (seriously, he’s a POS), he is right on this. It’s dumb to not let them come when they’re ready. They should at least allow players to petition for an exception to that rule when a freshmen has a season like AP had, or like Lawrence had. Then NFL is depriving themselves of these players, who could get hurt at any moment.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    I don’t disagree with you, especially about AP, but one year of college ball is about as “small sample” as can be. This could also be looked at as the NFL protecting its franchisees from “one hit wonders” that could get drafted high, perform low, and then flame out fast.

  38. Online bullies and people that say things they wouldn’t even remotely think of saying on the street amaze me.. Its like they hate life so much that their only satisfying need is thinking they won the internet for a day… Everyone bashing AP, AB, rodgers, etc every chance they get would have taken them in their prime or even now hands down..
    One incident doesnt define you and the edge of competitiveness none of us on here will ever experience is not comparable to their lives.
    A terrible human being rapes, murders, lures minors, steals, robs…

  39. Its crazy how people not like him for disciplining his child when most of the people who hate him ancestors beat a certain group of men, women, and children on the daily. Sooo hypocritical

  40. eazeback says:
    April 9, 2019 at 9:20 am
    he got robbed out of the Heisman because he was a freshman yet they gave it to johnny, excuse me john manziel…foh
    …………………………………………………………………………..
    Still trying to figure out what the hell I just read….

  41. “This could also be looked at as the NFL protecting its franchisees from “one hit wonders” that could get drafted high, perform low, and then flame out fast.”

    This isn’t AS big of a deal now that rookie contracts aren’t out of control like they used to be. Still a potential waste of a pick, but it’s at least not 60 million guaranteed, or whatever they were getting up to where a bust at the top of the draft crippled your team for two or 3 years.

    That said, I still don’t see why PFT’s so obsessed about this topic. True, there are a few exceptions where a player would be just fine going to the NFL early…but if the rule wasn’t in place you’d have all kinds of idiot athletes bailing college before they were ready…and then you’d actually have a legitimate problem for PFT to write about. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. And further, don’t change a league rule to benefit the exceptions while having a negative impact on the majority…

  42. There’s the reason Maurice lost his appeal to enter the league early. AP also wanted to cheat the system. Shocking! John Football is another reason you don’t ‘give’ the Heisman to a freshman!

  43. Can someone please explain the difference. Three hill getting crucified, rightfully so for what he did to his kid, but somehow AP, who whipped his defenseless kif bloody, gets a free pass?

  44. tinye67 says:
    April 9, 2019 at 11:52 am

    There are few that are physically gifted enough to make the jump to playing with grown men. There are fewer still that are mentally and emotionally ready for that leap.

    Keep the rule.
    ===================================================================================
    So if you personally are that player not being allowed to make millions for no other reason than some stupid rule, you would be cool with it? What about if your family is poor and that money could change your family’s life, you would still be cool with it?
    It shouldn’t be up to you or me or any other person to take away someone’s right to earn a living as an 18 year old adult. Whether or not the player is ready or not is besides the point & just a matter of opinion. Everybody is different.

  45. packers291 says:
    April 9, 2019 at 11:03 am
    The real issue here is the discrepancy in market value witnessed at the college level and at the pro level in regards to rookie contracts. Let the free market prevail; stop intervening with rules and let rookies of any age negotiate their contracts freely.

    Can somebody tell me what the problem is with free market contract negotiation?
    ————————————————-

    This is a free market contract negotiation. The NFL owners and the players union collectively bargain the rules that they see fit.

  46. BuckyBadger says:

    As long as you don’t discriminate by age unless there is an equal league to play in. We have rights you know. If an owner doesn’t want to draft that player than don’t do it. You don’t need a rule so no one can. That is just ridiculous, stop pretending you know what is best for everyone.

    —————————

    Why can the league not set minimum age requirements? I know of no law that makes such a standard illegal. The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) only applies to EEs who are age 40 and above, and to employers with 20 or more EEs. It’s a BS law that should be deemed unconstitutional but that’s another argument.

    You have rights, but the right to a job is not one of them. The league has decided that it is in the best interests of the league to not hire someone until they are three years removed from HS. Stop pretending you know what’s best for the league after they have already decided what is best for them.

    I have to believe you live in Madison (or nearby) with the twisted leftist logic swirling around in your brain.

  47. eazeback says:
    April 9, 2019 at 9:20 am
    he got robbed out of the Heisman because he was a freshman yet they gave it to johnny, excuse me john manziel…foh

    @@@@@@@@@

    Matt Lienart QB USC won the Heisman over Peterson

  48. stellarperformance says:
    April 9, 2019 at 9:59 am
    ……..and Viking fans put their myopic glasses focused on Rodgers. Rodgers…….the consummate team-player, teammate, who handles himself quietly and professionally, a guy most players should be trying to emulate, and Viking fans prefer their Golden Calf Peterson. Unreal.
    ——-
    This article has nothing to do with Rodgers – leave your childish worship of him in the packer threads. Most people do not care for Peterson because of his actions. Many people wanted him to do well as a Vikings as it helped the team, but would not consider themselves a fan of him. Just the same as many people find Rodgers to be a smug whiny individual, but he can throw a good football so they cheer for him on Sundays.

  49. That’s baloney. You’re telling me Russell Wilson in year 3 of his contract was being paid fair market value? What about Adrian Peterson in year #2? Those players are locked into contracts at artificially low values as dictated by a CBA that was negotiated against the best interest of incoming rookies.

    Guess who negotiates the CBAs? Not college players. Just current players. That means rookies get the raw end of the deal. Rookies who have no freedom to negotiate freely.

    You’re holding college players and rookies accountable to a CBA that they never played a role in negotiating and telling me it is “free market negotiation.” You couldn’t be more wrong.

  50. packers291 says:
    You’re holding college players and rookies accountable to a CBA that they never played a role in negotiating and telling me it is “free market negotiation.” You couldn’t be more wrong.
    ==

    Every worker in America who gains employment with a company where a union exists is bound by a working agreement that was negotiated before he began working there, including salary structures. The NFL is no different.
    Stop fooling yourself into thinking you’re smarter than everyone else. “You couldn’t be more wrong.” 🙂

  51. packers291 says:

    April 9, 2019 at 4:11 pm

    That’s baloney. You’re telling me Russell Wilson in year 3 of his contract was being paid fair market value? What about Adrian Peterson in year #2? Those players are locked into contracts at artificially low values as dictated by a CBA that was negotiated against the best interest of incoming rookies.

    Guess who negotiates the CBAs? Not college players. Just current players. That means rookies get the raw end of the deal. Rookies who have no freedom to negotiate freely.

    You’re holding college players and rookies accountable to a CBA that they never played a role in negotiating and telling me it is “free market negotiation.” You couldn’t be more wrong.
    ——–
    Every single company where a union is present the terms for new employees are agreed upon and set by current members. Just as every union is looking to benefit it’s current members not future members and that’s just common sense.

  52. SundaySwamiSaysDontDisagreeWithPftOrYourCommentWontBePosted says:

    Every single company where a union is present the terms for new employees are agreed upon and set by current members. Just as every union is looking to benefit it’s current members not future members and that’s just common sense./////

    Since most unions have been busted, you have companies that make up their own terms not agreed upon as part of your employment there. You take it or leave it.

  53. fmc651 says:

    April 9, 2019 at 8:26 pm

    SundaySwamiSaysDontDisagreeWithPftOrYourCommentWontBePosted says:

    Every single company where a union is present the terms for new employees are agreed upon and set by current members. Just as every union is looking to benefit it’s current members not future members and that’s just common sense./////

    Since most unions have been busted, you have companies that make up their own terms not agreed upon as part of your employment there. You take it or leave it.
    ——–
    As i said where a union is present or did you just skip that part? And again every union is more concerned about current members not future members. No union is going to give up a current benefit or something to negatively affect their current union members so they can help future members.

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