How will Kyler Murray handle adversity?

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Kyler Murray has had it easy in football. Very easy.  Maybe too easy.

Peter King points out in his latest Football Morning in America column that Murray has started 60 games over the last seven years. He has won 57, and he has lost three.

“[I]n the NFL, he could lose more starts in a month than he lost in the previous seven years,” King writes, and he’s right. And the question then becomes how will Murray handle adversity?

He probably won’t be able to handle it like he did after losing to Texas during the regular season, when a “good game” gesture from Longhorns quarterback Sam Ehlinger morphed into a perceived diss that echoed into the late-season rematch. But unlike most quarterbacks, who have no choice but to take some lumps if they want to play at the NFL level, Murray has an option, if football when it isn’t as easy as it’s been becomes less enjoyable.

Murray can, if he so desires, still play baseball.

That’s why it’s critical for the team that drafts Murray to believe that he’s all in with football, and that he’s willing to sign a contract that prevents him from playing baseball. Four years ago, the Buccaneers did that in the contract signed by quarterback Jameis Winston, which would have voided his future guarantees if he had done anything baseball related, short of throwing out a ceremonial first pitch at a baseball game.

Of course, that doesn’t stop Murray from paying back his unearned signing bonus (it wouldn’t be the first time he’s done that) and quitting football altogether. No matter what anyone from Murray’s camp currently says, there’s a chance that Murray’s views on football will change if it all of a sudden becomes much more of a struggle than it’s ever been.

8 responses to “How will Kyler Murray handle adversity?

  1. We’ve seen what Murray does with adversity. When things weren’t going the way he liked in College Station, he transferred. So far, the evidence is that he’ll pivot once things get tough.

  2. I do not understand the infatuation with this kid. I do see the talent. He has been very good at times but the NFL has chewed up and spit out many players who were spectacular in college. His size is not ideal and may be an issue and his style will be effected by a coaching staff that does not want to risk their investment. His interviews have shown a kid who is by no means ready to lead. He was not at all articulate and made many question his intelligence or ability to handle pressure. Toss in the fact that he already committed to baseball and then changed his mind and there is NO WAY I would risk drafting Murray before the back of round 2.

  3. wlubake says: “We’ve seen what Murray does with adversity. When things weren’t going the way he liked in College Station, he transferred. So far, the evidence is that he’ll pivot once things get tough.”
    ====================

    Was about to say the same thing after he lost out to Kyle Allen as the starting QB at Texas A&M, but he did stay in football and was willing to sit out a year because of the transfer. Plus, he also was backup to Baker Maysfield for another year. All that would point that he loves football more to stick around for two years on the bench, doesn’t it?

  4. akira1971 says:

    wlubake says: “We’ve seen what Murray does with adversity. When things weren’t going the way he liked in College Station, he transferred. So far, the evidence is that he’ll pivot once things get tough.”
    ====================
    Was about to say the same thing after he lost out to Kyle Allen as the starting QB at Texas A&M, but he did stay in football and was willing to sit out a year because of the transfer. Plus, he also was backup to Baker Maysfield for another year. All that would point that he loves football more to stick around for two years on the bench, doesn’t it?
    ====================
    Maybe, though it is a question of options. A transfer won’t be available. Does he stick it out on a bad Arizona team? Does he demand a trade? Does he abandon football for baseball? I’m just pointing out the one example we have for him. No idea what he’ll actually do. Transfers aren’t the end of the world. You only have 4 years of eligibility to audition for the NFL. Understandable that kids want to be able to showcase rather than ride the pine.

  5. Played against him in HS, as the bigest lineman on my team I weighed about the same as a leg of each of his O lineman. This dude has been surrounded by talent to another degree since he began playing. I dont understand the obsession with him, feel bad for whatever fan base has to support the next few years with him at the helm. One scramble away from ending up like RG3.

  6. He’d better get used to handling adversity if he’s drafted by Arizona. He’ll probably cry and go back to baseball after three years of losing at football.

  7. Liberalsruineverything says:
    April 22, 2019 at 12:29 pm
    This reminds me of the same drum beat I heard about Lamar Jackson last year. Small running college QBs are never worth a high pick unless you have an arm like Mike Vick did.
    ——-

    Funny because the criticism about Lamar Jackson had nothing to do with size. It was all about his inability to throw the ball accuratley. That isn’t even questioned in Kyler Murray’s case. So not the same drum beat, not even the same instrument.

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