Myles Garrett: Gregg Williams only let me use two moves

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Browns pass rusher Myles Garrett says he’s a more versatile player than he looked like when he was playing for Gregg Williams last year.

Garrett told Dan Pompei of BleacherReport.com that when Williams was the defensive coordinator, he was stifled by Williams’ insistence that he only needed to use two pass-rush moves.

“I hopefully have more freedom to be the player I want to be,” Garrett says. “Gregg was more like: ‘You win with these two moves. I don’t want to see anything else out of you.’ It’s kind of hard with two moves. I feel like you can’t always be so predictable. You can be as strong or fast as you want, but speed chop and power move aren’t always going to work. You have to mix up what you’re doing. Sometimes you have to stutter step, sometimes you have to spin inside, you have to run some games. You have to have some freedom to throw different looks at them, and we didn’t always have that.”

There’s been plenty of criticism of the coaching in Cleveland through the years, and stifling a talent like Garrett is certainly worthy of criticism. Perhaps head coach Freddie Kitchens and defensive coordinator Steve Wilks can run the first Cleveland coaching staff in a long time that doesn’t quickly get sent packing.

32 responses to “Myles Garrett: Gregg Williams only let me use two moves

  1. So Gregg Williams refined and polished Garrett’s two best pass rush moves which led to him going from 7 sacks to 13.5? Boo hoo. I’m taking the side of the guy who developed Aaron Donald and Sean Taylor.

  2. “Perhaps head coach Freddie Kitchens and defensive coordinator Steve Wilks can run the first Cleveland coaching staff in a long time that doesn’t quickly get sent packing.” What are you talking about? Hugh Jackson got way longer than he deserved.

  3. Myles, you didn’t like that?
    Then prove Williams wrong, use whatever moves you want and have a better year.

    Me personally, I’d have kept quiet.
    Then if I improved (due to using new moves) Id say “because coach Kitchens let me use X and Y moves that I wasn’t allowed to use before”. That way if you improve you look good, and you make your coach look good. If you don’t improve and prove Gregg Williams correct, you don’t look foolish.

  4. On the other hand, this is the first Browns coaching staff in a generation that actually faces expectations. If the team flops after a summer of unrelenting hype, the coaches are going to take a fair bit of the blame.

  5. Wow! Did Gregg recommend any new moves such as: The Last Ride(The Undertaker) or DDT(Jake The Snake)??!!

  6. So you want to freelance….this ought to go well.

  7. Greatness only needs two moves. Just ask Reggie White, Tim Duncan, or Randy Johnson. Everyone in the world knew what they were going to do. That didn’t mean anything when it came time to do anything about it.

  8. I remember hearing an interview with Scott Fujita where he was asked about Gregg Williams. He said that Gregg had a lot of “cartoonish tough talk” that works with the young guys but it gets old if you’re a vet. Fujita won a super bowl with Williams as his DC and didn’t have much positive to say. I always found that interesting.

  9. Greg Williams seems like the type to tell Dwight Freeney not to use his spin move.

  10. This is the craziest thing I’ve ever heard. I’ve only known for Gregg Williams coaching good defenses. The best pass rushers have several moves. I remember Bruce Smith having quite a few moves, lots of time utilizing more than one on the same play. This sounds like a little bit of exaggeration on the part of Myles Garrett.

  11. Yeah stutter step spin move the RB to an easy TD or first down, when if you stayed in your position you would’ve easily tackled. I’ve seen Everson Griffen do it a million times.

  12. Interesting that when Williams took the reins the defense got better. Instead of whining about what the coach was telling you that was working, why don’t you take that information and learn from it instead of thinking you know everything.

    Maybe, it will make you better. Garrett has out of this world talent, however if he starts believing that he knows it all, that might ruin him, don’t believe me, just ask RG3.

  13. What good does it do Garrett to throw his former coach under the bus? I would say that Gregg Williams knows a lot more about defense than Myles Garrett.

  14. I can see where “gap integrity” and “setting the edge” and things like that call for discipline but if you are rushing the passer then that is the ultimate freelance opportunity. I remember too Bruce Smith had taken Garrett under his wing being at his draft party and training camp and I don’t think he’d have agreed with Williams. In fact Bruce Smith was supposed to be showing his moves and then what? Gregg Williams told Bruce Smith to stop with “the two moves”? I don’t think so.

  15. My guess is that Williams intent in limiting him to the two moves is that he wanted him to become relentless in his attack and learn to wear down his opponent.

  16. ryann252013 says:
    May 2, 2019 at 1:23 pm
    So Gregg Williams refined and polished Garrett’s two best pass rush moves which led to him going from 7 sacks to 13.5? Boo hoo. I’m taking the side of the guy who developed Aaron Donald and Sean Taylor.
    ——————————–
    Well, then imagine what he could do with more than two moves.

  17. Myles Garrett: Gregg Williams only let me use two moves
    __________________________________________

    WOW this takes micromanaging to a new level!

  18. Well, let’s see, the 8 basic pass rushing techniques are the Bull Rush, the Speed Rush, the Swim Move, the Grab Move, the Rip/Inside move, the Spin Move, the Under Move, and the Counter/Club move. Ive read articles on Aaron Donald, J.J. Watt, Joey Bosa and Von Miller where they mention them using at least 3 or 4 of these. But considering how successful Gregg Williams was when he was a pass rusher, how could anyone take Myles Garrett seriously?

  19. Say what you want, but the team turned around literally the day he took over as HC.

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