Eric Bieniemy hopes “input” in Chiefs offense helps him in future

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There aren’t many offenses in the NFL teams would more like to copy than the Chiefs’.

So even though he doesn’t call all the plays — head coach Andy Reid handles that — Chiefs offensive coordinator Eric Bieniemy said he’s still an integral part of what they do, which should qualify him for future head-coaching opportunities.

“Here’s my response about the playcalling: coach Reid has always done it his way, and that’s how historically he’s done it because he’s coach Reid,” Bieniemy said, via Vaughn McClure of ESPN. “He has a beautiful mind, and we all work hand-in-hand together. And he gives me the green light to do a number of things. I have input. I do scripts. I get the install. There are a number of things that I do.”

Bieniemy’s role in the offense should help him, at a time when teams are leaning toward hiring coaches from that side of the ball. Working with any offense which includes Patrick Mahomes only helps. But in a cycle in which eight jobs changed hands, only one minority coach was hired (Brian Flores in Miami).

Bieniemy interviewed for that job as well, along with the Jets, Buccaneers, and Bengals. He said he was grateful for the opportunities, and hopes they position him well for future interviews. But he didn’t agree with the perception that his lack of control of the offense, or his non-quarterback background (he’s coached running backs) made him less viable.

He was on hand this week at the NFL Quarterback Coaching Summit hosted by the league and Black College Football Hall of Fame, so his status stood out. He and Byron Leftwich of the Buccaneers are the only minority coaches in offensive coordinator positions.

“I’ve been an offensive coach my whole entire life,” he said. “People think just because you coach running backs you don’t understand the pass game. Well, when you’ve played the position, and you’re involved in coaching the position, you’ve got to make sure guys understand the entire game plan, meaning you’re very much involved in the pass game. You have to understand protections. You have to understand route concepts. You have to understand how defenses are structured going against you.

“Do we need more [minority] coaches on the offensive side of the ball? Yes. How do we go about doing that? We have to make sure there’s a plan for guys of helping guys get into that quarterback room and into quality-control positions so those guys can add that knowledge and learn how to deal with the quarterbacks, learn the language and speak it.”

And then to convince people they’re able to speak it to the entire team.

13 responses to “Eric Bieniemy hopes “input” in Chiefs offense helps him in future

  1. What would be better? Taking a failed team and hope against the % that you will succeed or make $40-50M as the OC of the Mahomes Train the next 15 years. + KC is an amazing, rising City.

  2. If only he could take over clock management from Reid they might win the biggest games.

  3. But in a cycle in which eight jobs changed hands, only one minority coach was hired (Brian Flores in Miami).
    —–
    Seems weird that you guys pay so much attention to the skin color of NFL personnel. I don’t think any NFL team does, they’d hire a Klingon if they thought he’d win them a SB. But whatever helps your white guilt I guess.

  4. He was the Cardinals first choice for the job, and he declined their interview. So they hired the next great offensive mind in Kingsbury after kicking the tires on a few other guys, including Weirdo Adam Gase. Bieniemy could have landed a HC job if he wanted one. He didn’t.

  5. There’s a stigma to being a running back and RBs coach… having one as your head coach is kinda like having your drummer write the songs.

  6. People trying to make something out of nothing. Reid has always called his own plays except occasionally and 10 of his former assistants (most of them his former offensive coordinators) have become head coaches. If any assistant wants a head coaching job in the NFL, their best bet is to work for Belichick or Reid.

  7. pkrlvr, I was thinking the same thing.

    gerard33 – Phil Collins, Dave Grohl, Don Henley. Good try though.

  8. But in a cycle in which eight jobs changed hands, only one minority coach was hired (Brian Flores in Miami).
    —–
    Seems weird that you guys pay so much attention to the skin color of NFL personnel. I don’t think any NFL team does, they’d hire a Klingon if they thought he’d win them a SB. But whatever helps your white guilt I guess.

    — —

    It amazes me that people don’t think of the NFL as a racist and prejudice environment. I’ve worked on the team side and say that race is a big issue. Kliff Kingsbury was fired at Texas Tech. Fired! Is he really that good of a coach? I worked with Sean McVay— he’s a smart cool guy. You could see that he was destined for success. But he also had a last name and people like Jon and Jay, Mike, Kyle, that gave him opportunities. So no one is asking for a handout. People are seeking equal opportunities so all you fans can quit saying “we want the most qualified guy” when the pipeline is stacked. Google Dowell Loggins and tell me about his meteoric rise to OC. I’ll explain more in a later post

  9. Did I miss something, or did Doug Pederson never call a game until he got to Philly after years as Andy’s OC, and Nagy only had like 5 or 6 games of doing it before he got the Bear gig? But now it’s a knock on this guy? Why? This is why the race questions come up when you have double standards for the people who have served in the same role. Just say he didn’t interview as well, but when you use this as a crutch, of course minority coaches should be looking at you sideways and rightfully so.

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