Former Browns linebacker Vince Costello dies at 86

@Browns

Vince Costello, a linebacker who spent 10 seasons with the Browns, died over the weekend. He was 86.

Costello joined the Browns in 1957 at the age 25. He played for the Browns’ last championship team in 1964, and he finished his career with the Giants.

After his playing career ended, Costello coached linebackers from 1969 to 1973 in Cincinnati, and he then became the defensive coordinator of the Dolphins in 1974 and the Chiefs in 1975-76.

In 2011, Costello was inducted into the Browns Legends program.

We extend our condolences to Costello’s family, friends, and colleagues.

4 responses to “Former Browns linebacker Vince Costello dies at 86

  1. Sad to lose yet another wonderful player from my childhood. But as the loss of Bart Starr prompted memories of the second greatest team ever, the 1960s Green Bay Packers – the Pittsburgh Steelers of the 1970s were the greatest – Vince Costello’s death makes me think about the greatest player who ever lived, Jim Brown. Game day must have been a piece of cake for Costello after training camps and practices against Brown. And Costello doubtless made Brown better. Condolences to Costello’s family, friends, and the great fans of the Cleveland Browns.

  2. Sad to lose yet another wonderful player from my childhood. But as the loss of Bart Starr prompted memories of the second greatest team ever, the 1960s Green Bay Packers – the Pittsburgh Steelers of the 1970s were the greatest – Vince Costello’s death makes me think about the greatest player who ever lived, Jim Brown. Game day must have been a piece of cake for Costello after training camps and practices against Brown. And Costello doubtless made Brown better. Condolences to Costello’s family, friends, and the great fans of the Cleveland Browns.

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    I agree — it’s always a sad day when one of favorite players from when were kids passes away. I remember that ’64 championship game like it was yesterday. The Browns had a terrific offense with Dr Frank Ryan (who I think should be more recognized for just how good he was) and Paul Warfield and Gary Collins were excellent WR’s. And you’re right about the incomparable Jim Brown. He’d run over two or three guys, or simply blow by them with his speed, then he’d be slow to get up and almost always the last guy to get back to the huddle, then they’d hand him the ball and he’d do it all again. He is still the best RB I have ever seen.
    The one disagreement I have is Lombardi’s 60’s Packers verses the 70’s Steelers. They were both phenomenal teams, but the Steelers played in a different era so it’s unfair to compare them, in my view. But Lombardi’s teams did what no one else has done — they were in 6 championship games in 7 years and only lost one time — in Lombardi’s first championship game in 1960. So to put them 2nd to anyone is unfair, I believe. They were such a great team, the offensive linemen would sometimes tell the defensive linemen which way they were running, and they’d run that way and still get huge yards anyway.
    One thing people forget is that the Packers had Jimmy Taylor at FB, and he was almost always second in rushing to Jim Brown. He was one of the best runners and terrific blockers that ever played, but he gets over-looked because Brown was so good. Paul Hornung, who played QB, RB, safety, at Notre Dame, and is still the only player ever chosen from a losing team as the Heisman Trophy winner (ND was 2 and 8 that year) was utilized by Lombardi as an all purpose RB. He’d play halfback, flanker, WR, he’d throw passes from his halfback position, and even did their kicking. He has said that without Jimmy Taylor he would have never been elected to the Hall Of Fame.
    R.I.P. to Vince Costello and my sincere condolences to his family and friends.

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