NFL, NFLPA hold a bargaining session in Chicago

Getty Images

With one month to go until the regular season begins, it’s highly unlikely that a new labor deal will be struck before the Packers and Bears kick off from Chicago on September 5. But that isn’t stopping the two sides from working toward an eventual consensus.

Per multiple sources, the NFL and NFL Players Association held a bargaining session on Monday. It’s the first full-blown meeting since three days of planned talks in mid-July ended on the first day, and it comes eight years to the day after the signing of the current Collective Bargaining Agreement.

Previously, the two sides had planned to resume their negotiations on July 29. That session was postponed; the league and union met today.

Preliminary sessions have been positive. but it’s unlikely that any potentially contentious topics were addressed in the early meetings. Eventually, they’ll begin grappling over the key issues: How to carve the billions-dollar pie, and whether and to what extent the league will be permitted to take money off the top for stadium construction and renovation.

Eventually, the two sides will be fighting — that’s inherent to collective bargaining. But they’re trying desperately to shield the fans and the media from any evidence of acrimony, no matter how inevitable it is.

12 responses to “NFL, NFLPA hold a bargaining session in Chicago

  1. They need to let teams expand the regular season roster to 62. Get rid of the stupid injured reserve rule and let teams replace injured players as they see fit. The players need to agree to a salary cap at each position. It would make the league a lot more competitive and ensure the players dont price themselves out of a job. The fans are the ones that suffer the most when salaries keep skyrocketing because the owners just pass that cost on to us.

  2. “and to what extent the league will be permitted to take money off the top for stadium construction and renovation.”

    LOL…..since when have the owners or Goodell ever cared about paying for their own stadiums? They usually fleece the city to pay for it or threaten to leave.

  3. If the NFLPA does not insist that a Bye-week follows for a team that plays on Monday and precedes weeks where teams play on Thursday and Saturday they are incompetent and have no concern for player safety.

    Of course, the NFL not doing that already shows the same.

  4. Owners: We’ll let you use weed if you agree that all contracts have zero guaranteed money.

    NFLPA: Deal!

  5. Not that anything more than a couple of sentences will get past the moderation queue but…

    “Eventually, they’ll begin grappling over the key issues: How to carve the billions-dollar pie, and whether and to what extent the league will be permitted to take money off the top for stadium construction and renovation.”

    Under the current CBA premium seating and corporate mega-deals were excluded from revenue-sharing because large portions of those funds are supposedly directed toward the (ahem) mutual benefit of stadium upkeep, renovations and construction. That apparently wasn’t enough for the league who got caught with their hand in the cookie jar when they used some very creative accounting to siphon $120M off the top under in just under 3 years under the guise of a made up funds category they called “waived gate” revenue. Somehow the NFL attempting to rip the players off generated next to no news. The NFLPA needs to split every hair when it comes to anything having to do with exempting revenue for stadiums considering they’re dealing with owners who used it as an excuse to steal from them before, don’t think twice about bending over taxpayers for it and wouldn’t hesitate to take the pennies from their own dead grandmother’s eyes

  6. I’m hoping for a strike or a lockout. Interesting in seeing what Fantasy football team owners will do for entertainment

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!