Jay-Z doesn’t want to get “stuck on Colin [Kaepernick] not having a job”

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Jay-Z could have declined to do business with the NFL until the NFL committed to continuing doing business with Colin Kaepernick. Jay-Z decided that the ongoing shunning of Kaepernick was not a dealbreaker.

“We forget that Colin’s whole thing was to bring attention to social injustice,” Jay-Z said Wednesday, via ESPN.com. “In that case, this is a success. This is the next phase. There [are] two parts of protesting. You go outside and you protest, and then the company or the individual says, ‘I hear you. What do we do next?'”

Well, for starters, we quit blackballing the person who sparked the movement. But that’s apparently not part of this arrangement.

“For me it’s like action, [an] actionable item, what are we gonna do with it?” Jay-Z said. “Everyone heard, we hear what you’re saying, and everybody knows I agree with what you’re saying [in Kaepernick’s underlying message]. So what are we gonna do? You know what I’m saying? [Help] millions and millions of people, or we get stuck on Colin not having a job.”

As former Kaepernick teammate Eric Reid, now a safety in Carolina, pointed out on Twitter, the answer can be both.

These aren’t mutually exclusive,” Reid said. “They can both happen at the same time! It looks like your goal was to make millions and millions of dollars by assisting the NFL in burying Colin’s career.”

Let’s put this in a different context. There’s a chronically unsafe condition in a factory, presenting a serious risk to the safety of all employees. One of the employees decides to loudly complain about the safety risk, and management fires him for doing it.

But the employee keeps complaining, and others eventually join in. Eventually, management has no choice but to fix the unsafe condition. And then management fixes the unsafe condition, but it refuses to reinstate the employee who was fired for being the first one to complain about it.

That’s basically what’s going on with the NFL and Kaepernick, and Jay-Z is pointing to the fact that the NFL has gotten the message while glossing over the fact that it has killed the career of the messenger.

31 responses to “Jay-Z doesn’t want to get “stuck on Colin [Kaepernick] not having a job”

  1. Except Kaep wasn’t fired. He essentially quit. And if he was talented enough, he’d be playing. He ranked near the bottom of most passing stats even when he was at the supposed top of his game. He was far too inaccurate and teams had largely figured out how to contain him.

  2. What was the unsafe condition that Kaepernick pointed out? He disrespected our country and He got what he deserved.

  3. Your analogy is way off, it goes more like this: An employee is doing substandard work and gets demoted (benched for Blaine Gabbert) then starts activities about nothing to do with any conditions in his company to keep himself relevant and in the spotlight (anthem protests) He continues his spotlight behavior (pig socks and castro shirts) then he quits (opts out of contract). He is presented with three other opportunities to rejoin the company at his market rate based on his recent job skills but turns the opportunities down or blows the interviews. That’s basically what’s going on with the NFL and Kaepernick, nothing near getting fired for reporting an unsafe condition within the company.

  4. You keep forgetting that Kaepernick sucks and the baggage he would bring with him is not worth it to any team. It’s not that difficult.

  5. What’s the “chronically unsafe condition in the (nfl), presenting a serious risk to the safety of all employees.” That “One of the employees decides to loudly complain about the safety risk, and management fires him for doing it.”

    That makes no sense at all.

  6. Kaep wasn’t in a factory fixing unsafe conditions. Kaep was using his dwindling NFL career as a platform for politics that was dividing the customers and hurting the bottom line. The broadcast is better without spending 10 minutes of commentary on who’s protesting and who’s not.

  7. Maybe he doesn’t want to get hung up on Kaepernick having a “job” because employing him as a QB would be a joke. After getting worse every year he finally found a way to maintain: sell shoes.

  8. There’s a chronically unsafe condition in a factory, presenting a serious risk to the safety of all employees. One of the employees decides to loudly complain about the safety risk, and management fires him for doing it.

    Wow, you are really out there with this analogy.
    What Colin was complaining about had ZERO to do with the “factory” he works in.

  9. Reporting a safety concern is not equivalent to protesting something that has nothing to do with your workplace, at your workplace.

  10. Eric Reid has a great point. As I posted yesterday, this is a bad for Jay-Z. It essentially looks like he sold out. The NFL dangles ownership in front of him & his moral compass goes berserk.
    **************
    “But the employee keeps complaining, and others eventually join in. Eventually, management has no choice but to fix the unsafe condition. And then management fixes the unsafe condition, but it refuses to reinstate the employee who was fired for being the first one to complain about it.”

    Close but, no cigar. The initial problem complained about, has NOT been resolved. There is still an injustice issue & also the ‘anthem issue’.

    THIS: ““These aren’t mutually exclusive,” Reid said. “They can both happen at the same time! It looks like your goal was to make millions and millions of dollars by assisting the NFL in burying Colin’s career.”

    Bam!

  11. Burying his career? Although I agree with his decision and right to do what he wishes, he also has the right to suffer the consequences, and most teams do not want to anger at least 40 percent of their customer base by hiring him. It would be a bad decision for their businesses. Same situation as Tim Tebow distraction wise, but with the added issue of a lot of older white paying customers now boycotting the team. I don’t think we need collusion for 32 teams to avoid that kind of headache.

  12. Nice narrative Florio accept like “hands up don’t shoot” in Ferguson, it’s just not true! NFL is committing suicide hitching their horse to the Jay Z SJW wagon.

  13. Money Money Money, MONEY
    Some people got to have it
    Some people really need it
    Listen to me why’all, do things, do things, do bad things with it
    You want to do things, do things, do things, good things with it
    Talk about cash money, money
    Talk about cash money- dollar bills, why’all
    For the love of money
    People will steal from their mother
    For the love of money
    People will rob their own brother

  14. So Kaepernick was protesting unsafe working conditions now? That comparison is absurd. The NFL has nothing to do with the situation that was being protested- unless you believe that the situation was being benched for Blaine Gabbert. In that case, the NFL has not yet addressed the scourge of Blaine Gabbert having a job.

  15. The analogy is not correct. They write it like the NFL were the people who they were protesting against. They were just using the NFL platform and position to make their statement. Huge difference. Our good friend Kap was protesting against the black condition in general. Not what the NFL was doing. And Reid is wrong they are Mutually exclusive, they are only mutually exclusive if you want them to be and they obviously do not. But because Reid thinks it is don’t make it so. Now let’s build of their poor example. What if the guy they fired that complained about the condition was also a poor employee. Then what?

  16. According to Pro Football Reference, his record was 28-30 during his career from 2011 to 2016. His completion average was 59.8%. During his last two seasons his record was 3-16, with one 4th quarter comeback. Not exactly stellar. Not surprising that no one wants him. And he wasn’t fired, he quit.

    And if I want to see a picture of a player with a caption that says “Believe in something. Even if it means sacrificing everything”, I’ll find one of Pat Tillman, who actually did that, and didn’t sign an apparel contract worth millions when he did it.

  17. That’s not what happened. Kaep settled instead of following through on his vision. This isn’t reporting, it’s propoganda. Why should Jay-Z be responsible for this idiot? I hope Jay-Z does get a team.

  18. “There’s a chronically unsafe condition in a factory, presenting a serious risk to the safety of all employees. One of the employees decides to loudly complain about the safety risk, and management fires him for doing it.”

    So the NFL is responsible for social injustice, just as the company in your example is responsible for unsafe working conditions? I think your desire to push a narrative has clouded your ability to be objective.

    It’s more like an employee of Company X complaining about Company Y, while on the clock in a manner that impacts the ability of Company X to do business.

    Kap should start his own league or buy a team and he can run it as he sees fit, and more power to him.

  19. the social injustice nfl players are protesting is they are not paid nba stupid money….but if they said that in public they would be ignored and laughed at…the kneeling stuff is cheap heat to make the league and owners look less than human….give it another 12-18 months and their battle cry will be “equal pay” in some stupid twist…..it’s all a work

  20. The NFL isn’t keeping Colin out the NFL…COlin is keeping Colin out if the NFL. The guy had FOUR opportunities at a job since SF and either chose not to take them or blew them with his “antics”. Let Colin continue to enjoy being a self-proclaimed “martyr”.

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