College athletes in California move closer to compensation (and Tim Tebow doesn’t like it)

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The passage of the Fair Pay to Play Act by the California Senate didn’t generate much national buzz this week. Tim Tebow’s misguided reaction to it did.

The bill that, when signed into law by California Governor Gavin Newsome, will give college athletes the right to earn money from the names, images and likenesses, sparked a strong reaction by one of the greatest college football players of all time, pro careers notwithstanding.

“I knew going to Florida, my dream school, where I wanted to go, the passion for it, and if I could support my team, support my college, support my university, that’s what it’s all about,” Tim Tebow said on ESPN’s First Take, via Jacob Bogage of the Washington Post. “But now we’re changing it from us, from we, from my university, from being an alumni where I care, which makes college football and college sports special, to then, okay, it’s not about us, it’s not about we, it’s just about me. And yes, I know we live in a selfish culture where it’s all about us, but we’re just adding and piling on to that where it changes what’s special about college football.

“That’s why people are more passionate about college sports than they are the NFL. That’s why the stadiums are bigger in college than they are in the NFL, because it’s about your team. It’s about your university. It’s about where my family wanted to go. It’s about where my grandfather had a dream of seeing Florida win an SEC championship, and you’re taking that away so that young kids can earn a dollar, and that’s just not where I feel like college football needs to go. There’s that opportunity in the NFL, but not in college football.”

But, Tim, only a fraction of college football players ever get that opportunity in the NFL. Besides, everyone else connected to college sports is getting a taste of all that money, while the players hide in the corner and nibble on their snacks.

Tebow’s comments prompted widespread criticism, as they should have. At best, he’s incredibly naive. At worst, he’s willingly defending however he can the college football machine that preserves and protects a corrupt system that ensures those who sell the college football broadcasting rights to ESPN continue to get their full cut of the pie — and that creates opportunities for every college football broadcaster at ESPN to make money from their own endorsement deals without having to compete with, you know, the players.

Jay Bilas is also part of that machine, from the standpoint of ESPN’s coverage of college basketball. But Bilas didn’t flinch at telling it like it is.

“I think it’s immoral for college athletes to be told they’re worth nothing when they’re not worth nothing,” Bilas told the Post. “They’re worth billions. This train is rolling down the tracks toward compensation and the NCAA’s response is, ‘Let’s lash the players to the tracks and tell lawmakers they’ll be hurting the student athletes.’ That’s simply not true.”

The NCAA has suggested that California schools won’t be eligible for championships, and that the bill is unconstitutional because California lacks the jurisdiction . . . to regulate the colleges in its own state.

Bilas also had a direct message for Tebow, who passionately championed the virtues of playing college football for no pay.

“Tim could choose to work for free at ESPN, if he wants to,” Bilas told the Post. “That doesn’t mean I should work for free. An individual choice does not justify the policy.”

Exactly. For every Tebow who doesn’t need or want the money, there are plenty of kids who fall into the “my family could really use it” and/or the “well, you see, I’m a capitalist” categories. If kids want to continue to be exploited by a system that generates billions while paying them bupkis (other than the wholesale cost of an education, which is far, far less than the retail price that no one ever pays), that’s their choice. If kids want to get a little something for their efforts — even if it means siphoning a chunk of the raw profit that, for example, Florida generated with all those 15 jerseys — they should be able to do that, too.

Bilas wasn’t alone in questioning Tebow. Via Jay Rigdon of AwfulAnnouncing.com, Keith Olbermann, Mina Kimes, and Mike Golic also chimed in.

Here’s the bottom line: The NCAA and many of those connected to the game of college football have been stealing the eggs from the golden geese for decades. The closer we get to the reckoning, the harder and they’ll fight against change.

79 responses to “College athletes in California move closer to compensation (and Tim Tebow doesn’t like it)

  1. Then if they get paid they should have to repay their tuition. Give them the option. If they want to get paid, then they need to pay back. Why do we assume that a college education cost doesn’t hold value.
    And to use the work as ESPN for free example is not even the same comparison.

  2. I have seen a lot of things written about Tebow over the years. I do not recall anyone ever describing him as intelligent or thoughtful. I am in no way surprised to hear this coming from him. He seems to be the kind of person who would easily buy into the propaganda from the school and NCAA. The times, they are a changing.

  3. I’m all for college athletes being paid. It can be, and often is, a full-time job. That being said, if they do become paid employees, start making them pay for tuition, books, room/board, etc. I think that’s more than reasonable. They shouldn’t get their cake and eat it too.

  4. “I have seen a lot of things written about Tebow over the years. I do not recall anyone ever describing him as intelligent or thoughtful. He seems to be the kind of person who would easily buy into the propaganda from the school and NCAA.”

    This.

  5. As a grad student you get paid by the university to work for them and tuition is paid for. Pretty sure grad students give a lot less to the university than the big pay sports programs. The notion you can’t pay them both tuition and cash is silly.

  6. I wonder if this is driven by politics? Since Trump was elected I’ve noticed that a lot of conservatives have dug in and basically support anything the right does while opposing everything the left does. The actual issue/policy doesn’t seem to matter nearly as much as who supports it anymore. Perhaps staunchly conservative Tebow just dislikes this because a very liberal governor in a very liberal state is the one who did it. If his side had come up with it and put the plan into action I wonder if he’d still be so opposed?

  7. That being said, if they do become paid employees, start making them pay for tuition, books, room/board, etc. I think that’s more than reasonable
    —–
    100% agreed

  8. I think there is no good way to pay athletes fairly. Let them profit from their fame via endorsements but not from the NCAA. To balance things I’d rather see all the administrators and schools make much much less. Cap their profits and salaries and pour that money into research grants, scholarships and education programs for the disadvantage.

  9. I think when they pull the curtain back on this, we are going to discover there is more than enough to go around and that compensation can work for all parties.

  10. Lol all these naive people pretending that there’s any value in the “education” full time athletes get at a power 5 school. I used to tutor athletes in college and it consisted of them watching me take their test for them and giving me $100 for 3 hours. Stop pretending these kids are anything but full time athletes masquerading as students.

  11. It’s shocking to see anyone argue against this, especially when people say “they should have to pay back their tuition, books, etc.”

    That’s ridiculous. I got a full ride academic scholarship to college and in my junior year, I got a part time job at UPS. Since I started making money at UPS, should that have canceled out my scholarship? Heck no! And it’s no different than a college football player deciding to get a part time job. The NCAA prohibits this and it’s crazy.

  12. Free tutoring. Free fitness training. Free education. Free food. Free room and board. Free clothing. Free help in anything they want. Multiple opportunities to screw up and getting swept under the rug. Sure let’s pay them cash too.

  13. Why should athletes have to pay back tuition? Should the academic students who have full academic scholarships have to pay back tuition and books and fees and all if they decide to get a job while in school?

    That idea is ridiculous.

  14. Where it is true that there are a few athletes who go to college with plans to play in the NFL, NBA, MLB, NHL, the majority of them go to get an education for their future career and use their ability as an athlete to keep from having to pay for tuition and mounting student loans that most college students have to get. This is invaluable to most college athletes. Most people who attend college have loans to pay back for several years, but the athletes who got free tuition don’t have to worry about that. People seem to be forgetting that. They are worried about the very few who don’t want the degree and go on to play pro sports, but don’t seem to be thinking about the college swimmer who just wants an education and not have to pay back loans.

  15. So if this happens does that mean all the top recruit’s are going to go play in California? Is this their way of trying to make college football relevant again in California?

  16. I disagree, Tim.

    98% of athelees do NOT go pro.

    Not only did Tim grow up in the middle-upper class, he also went Pro.

    Give these kids some money. So many people, myself included, had to drop out of college to take care of my own new born children. (It was my own fault).

    However, if I had the possibilty to make money playing college football, I could have also finished my degree.

    Besides that, do you know how many kids play sports, go to school full time AND have to work part time to get through college. It’s absurd these atheletes who make hundreds of millions for thee Universities don’t get a bigger piece of the pie as they try to finish their school and survive. Don’t give them a ton of money…but give them something.

    Where does Tim think the money is going if they don’t pay these atehletes?

  17. Basically we are doing away with college sports and letting rich alumni try to buy championships for their schools. I can pay
    $ 20 Million to use a team’s image on my shoe lace package. That’s $ 210,000 per all 95 players on the team. Rich teams will get richer. As the bidding goes up for players many schools won’t be able to compete and we will have only a few schools competing at the highest level. With today’s transfer rules, the other schools will be farm teams.

  18. I love the idea and I think said top atheletes should pay the college tuition of the lower players on the team and that these teams only give a couple of scholarships a year to these guys and they help recruit and pay for the rest of the teammates.
    I mean you want free books, tuition, room and board plus get paid for commercials? Ya thats fair to the rest of the non student athletes.

  19. And one thing to add on to my previous comment, a lot of the money made from football and basketball goes to pay for the sports like swimming, lacrosse, etc. that don’t make any money. If colleges have to pay tuition to football and basketball players, that will take money away from the other sports and some lacrosse player or swimmer may have to get a loan now that they would have had a scholarship for.

  20. rparrott4 says:
    September 14, 2019 at 9:19 am
    I’m all for college athletes being paid. It can be, and often is, a full-time job. That being said, if they do become paid employees, start making them pay for tuition, books, room/board, etc. I think that’s more than reasonable. They shouldn’t get their cake and eat it too.

    ______

    I disagree with making them pay for tution.

    Take the guy or gal that got a 4.0 in High School. Could have gotten a full ride and tutuion paid for.

    What else are they bringing to that University?

    A college football player, who might not be as smart in school, is not only going to school at that university but helping bringing in Millions of dollars while devoting 4-5 hours EVERY day to that schools sports program.

    I truly believe he/she should be paid as a job and the tuition paid for.

    I can’t think of any college student bringing in more money to a university then certain college atheletes in certain sports.

  21. The problem in this country is the greedy not the needy. NCAA is a fine exhibit of this. The bitter old men who individually make millions for themselves every year don’t want to give up a single penny to people making that income for them.

    Yes, the schools give them scholarships, but that costs the NCAA nothing and the schools very little in the big picture. They’ll hold on with a death grip to avoid paying the people making their living for them, but its time for this to change

  22. I don’t think colleges should pay players but if someone wants to pay a player to be spokesman or advertise a product more power to them. And why should they have to repay their scholarships? Do people on academic scholarship have to repay if they get a job?

  23. I love posts like this because regular people go out of their way to protect a multi-billion dollar farm system that doesn’t pay it’s full-time workers.
    There are exceptions, but for the most part there is little student in the “student athlete”. And the overwhelming majority of these kids never get a sniff of the NFL.

  24. It is my belief that once they start to get paid they are no longer student athletes. Receiving a paycheck to “play” sports automatically makes them paid professionals. Students who are not on a football or basketball team are the true student athletes.

  25. If they get paid to play they’re pros.
    If they are going to let pros play in college, what’s to stop Cal from paying Aaron Rodgers to play for them?
    If the whole “amature” thing is just a gimmick, NCAA teams should be able to pay thier players just like the NFL teams do.
    If “no pay for amatures” is just an old fuddy-duddy’s rule, why is a four years eligibility limit OK?
    Some of those kids who don’t make the NFL could sure use the money from playing college ball for 5 or 6 more years-to help their family you know.

  26. People forget the training and education in the sports they play is also part of the education and is basically a resume for their application in professional sports its also a platform for them to showcase their talents to their potential employers and an opportunity to increase their skill level and before you say but not all of them go pro it is their choice to play said sport and just like all College students none are guaranteed jobs after school. College sports is not a job its is and education for a very high paying highly competitive job field with no guarantee for employment.

  27. Sorry, their athletic scholarship is sufficient payment. They are representing the student body, the university and alumni. At USC that athletic scholarship is valued between $300-400k. If anyone should get a cut it’s the student body.

  28. Anyone who doesnt think they should get paid us crazy. Lets clear this up. Only like 1 percent have a chance to go pro. They take a beating playing football. The football programs make enough money to pay for all the other sports programs that wouldn’t exist. There would be zero girls sports at these school if it wasnt for football. Big schools can also afford to pay cupcakes schools millions to come get beat down. OsU paid UCF 1.5 million to come lose. They make money off these kids, some college coaches make more than pro ones. Why should the NCAA keep all that money when these kids are tearing ACLs and having surgery’s. All these idiots that dont wamt ro see them paid are same ones that are for unpaid internships and CEOs making 250% of their average worker. Stop feeling bad for billionaires

  29. I don’t care how you slice this student/athlete nonsense. If you throw your body around in a violent sport that can leave you permanently damaged, you had best believe there should be compensation. An education is hardly a fair trade given the revenue of this business. Let’s start compensating coal miners with books and lectures then. Think that would fly?

  30. No, here’s the bottom line. It’s a problem major college football and basketball players don’t have any money in their pockets, but a solution that makes sense has yet to be proposed or if it has I have not seen it. How do you determine how much each player gets? How long until smaller sports that don’t bring in a profit start having to cut back bc the school doesn’t have the money it used to? These are two huge questions and I suspect there will be a lot of unintended consequences when this starts to happen.

  31. I love the game of college football. The trophies, the rivalries, the pageantry, the unpredictability.
    I despise the NCAA organization.
    Honestly, I go back and forth on this debate.

    Aren’t olympic-sport college athletes allowed to make money on their image and likeness? Like Katie Ledecky? Pardon me if I’m not fully informed, but if that’s the case, why can’t money-making sports athletes sell autographs, profit off their image and likeness, whatever? That seems off to me. As for a salary? Ehh…not sure so about that.

    Also – if this makes it that much easier for EA to bring back the NCAA Football video game, then I’m definitely on board. Just saying…

  32. The ncaa should have allowed schools to start paying all D1 b-ball and football players a significant stipend years ago. By insisting that all they deserve is tuition and room and board, they’re going to make the lawmakers take it much farther. Once players can seek individual endorsements the big teams might as well make their own division because the small schools won’t have a shot (in either sport). Im not against it, but it will change college football as we know it.

  33. Too many comments presuppose all athletes are going to make money aside from the athletic scholarship money. Only the stars, not the rest of the team, will have money opportunities. Now, shoe companies, etc., will ally with the major colleges that will recruit with the money endorsements guaranteed. Brick and mortar colleges and universities are eventually going away as the online programs become more and more available at substantially less cost, so this will last for awhile but eventually the schools themselves will have their own contracts as they will be able to offer athletes the money opportunities and the games the TV will seek, so lots of money, just the demise of stadiums with alumni and students in them. Look at Reggie Bush who made lots of money before and after his pro days, never suffering anything for being a corrupt individual.

  34. In California there are only a few FBS schools who can afford to pay athletes. USC, and Stanford. There are some limitations for the UCs (Cal and UCLA) and almost impossible for the CSUs (Fresno State, San Diego State and San Jose State). This would kill off the last three.

  35. I have seen a lot of things written about Tebow over the years. I do not recall anyone ever describing him as intelligent or thoughtful. I am in no way surprised to hear this coming from him. He seems to be the kind of person who would easily buy into the propaganda from the school and NCAA. The times, they are a changing.
    —————–
    Then you must have been living under a rock because Tebow is one of the MOST thoughtful guys out there. He’s bright, honest, the consummate teammate and a really good dude. There has never been a bad word said about him.
    You can argue his points but don’t sound like a clown while doing so.

  36. They are getting compensated for playing football with their scholarship. So what happens if they start paying players, you are going to have these slimeball agents preying on these young kids, there will be a player who will hold out because he’s not getting paid enough, and schools with more money will have better student atheletes.

  37. They are getting free school. That’s compensation. What am I missing?

    Once they start getting paid, are they going to pay tuition like everyone else? I hope so.

  38. I disagree with making them pay for tution.

    Take the guy or gal that got a 4.0 in High School. Could have gotten a full ride and tutuion paid for.

    What else are they bringing to that University?

    A college football player, who might not be as smart in school, is not only going to school at that university but helping bringing in Millions of dollars while devoting 4-5 hours EVERY day to that schools sports program.

    I truly believe he/she should be paid as a job and the tuition paid for.

    I can’t think of any college student bringing in more money to a university then certain college atheletes in certain sports.
    ——————-
    You asked what the scholars bring to the university? Public standing, recognition and status among the universities. If you have brilliant and successful alumni then they contribute millions down the road once they are working professionals. Sometimes they build new buildings and start new programs. All donated.
    I don’t know this for sure but I would venture to guess that academics donate a hell of a lot more $$$ to their universities than athletes do.
    So that answers the question of how the school benefits from smart kids getting scholarships.

  39. The reason the school gives athletes scholarships in the first place is because it’s an investment. Economics is often a difficult thing to wrap your head around, particularly in an evolving system like capitalism.

    The school, to say nothing of the conferences and the NCAA, makes billions of dollars every year on the product they call sports. The athlete is at the school to work in the field of athletics. The scholarship is the contract that the school and the athlete enter into in order to facilitate this process. A degree is nothing more than compensated benefit.

    If the athlete gets a side gig, like working for minimum wage in a traditional business, no one jumps up and tells them that now they have to repay a contract that has nothing to do with the side job. How is benefiting from your own likeness different from a job in a sandwich shop? Why do so many people think that an athlete that generates money for a university, conference, television, and the NCAA should pay back anything for an over-priced “scholarship” that is really nothing but cover for a contract that is heavily tilted in favor of the business at the expense of the employee?

    California’s proposal will push the NCAA into the 21st century, even if they go kicking and screaming. The chance to make some money on the side off of your own image will likely attract athletes to the state, although the overall number of viable endorsements would probably be low. Then again, thousands of athletes take the path to college sports armed with the dream of making a pro career out of it, so they won’t mind the possibly long odds of a paying deal involving their own image.

    This is a very good start to remaking an organization that has basically been abusing people for profit for a very long time. For a country that prides itself on equality, freedom, the free market, and taking responsibility for one’s actions, I find it troubling that so many think it’s still ok to keep an entire class of people in relative poverty for profit.

  40. The players are paid: tuition, housing, training table, tutors, athletic trainers, free coaching. University athletic departments already have too much debt. Student athletic fees are already too high.
    Stop listening to Bilas, Olbermann, and ESPN in general. Stop listening to those that want to goad states and schools into taking more unneeded debt.

  41. Sorry, but to quote his favorite movie, The Writer’s argument does not hold water. The only athletes that really deserve to be paid are the ones that are talented enough to go professional, they are the ones that generate the income for the colleges. The remainder of the athletes are getting a quality education. Or they should be if they don’t that’s on them.

  42. pkrlvr says:
    September 14, 2019 at 9:33 am
    I wonder if this is driven by politics? Since Trump was elected I’ve noticed that a lot of conservatives have dug in and basically support anything the right does while opposing everything the left does.
    ————————————–

    There’s nothing new about that, on either side of the aisle. John Adams was railing against the perils of party system politics 230 years ago.

  43. I agree players should in a perfect world be paid. However, I fear the tuition for other students will just be raised to offset the difference.
    On the other hand, once USC begins to pay the players themselves, I have a feeling most of their players will notice they got paid more when it was off the books.

  44. The problem is they are not going to be paid by the school they play for, a player has to be offered an endorsement deal. So only the players who are going to the NFL/NBA anyway will be the ones to get paid. Meanwhile the middle tier player gets nothing.That in itself will create problems. Im not saying collegiate players shouldnt be paid, they should be paid by the school that makes billions off them.

    Another issue with this is California’s universities will be banned from competing outside the state because of unfair recruiting advantages, it wont be just Championships they cant compete for.

  45. College football subsides virtually all other sports… including Title IX.

    Would not paying players force many mid-major schools to have to scale back and eliminate women’s crew, volleyball, golf etc?

  46. I agree that players should get fair compensation. I hope they figure something out. The only problem with that is, what’s fair? The NCAA brings in 8 billion a year from sports. There are 460,000 NCAA students. That’s about 17400 per athlete. Students on full rides already get that in form full rides, housing, food etc.. . Only big schools would be able to pay all their players fairly relative to the billions being made and it would be even more lopsided competition wise than it already is.

    I dont see anything wrong with letting players get paid for endorsement deals. The ones getting the endorsements are probably the ones responsible for the big schools making the money they do so that would be fair in my opinion.

  47. I wonder if this is driven by politics? Since Trump was elected I’ve noticed that a lot of conservatives have dug in and basically support anything the right does while opposing everything the left does.

    No unfortunately political tribalism has been around long before Trump and will be here long after he’s gone. Oh and liberals do the same exact thing with their politicians.

  48. Where does Tim think the money is going if they don’t pay these athletes?

    ————————————-

    As with most universities with football and basketball programs, the revenue(money) from these goes to support all the other sports programs!
    If the university starts paying it’s top athletes, that money has to come from somewhere! Maybe one less female athlete gets a scholarship, maybe an entire team goes unfunded! Or, God forbid, a tenured prof gets the boot!

  49. I can see this working for private schools such as USC and Stanford, but the state schools like UCLA and San Diego State (let alone the smaller schools like UC Davis), I see a problem. The public, who, a large percentage of here in CA don’t care a whit for college sports, are going to take issue with their tax dollars paying athletes. It’s gonna get very interesting!

    And to an earlier point, I don’t think this is about CA trying to reinvigorate college football in state by drawing top prospects here. I think it’s a move by the state government to be fair to athletes, and that makes the move a political hot potato as well

  50. If you start paying athletes at colleges, the first to go will be other programs that do not pay for themselves. The next will be colleges losing their football programs because they cannot afford to pay their players what other universities can afford to pay them. We already see colleges making decisions on who to play based on how much the hosting school is offering (See FAU/ Ohio State for more information). I’m not saying the current system is perfect (it isn’t) but before we have one state jump the gun on the other 49 states, why not put a plan in place that allows players to be played, protects other athletic programs, and maintains the football program stability at colleges.

  51. amurdora says:
    September 14, 2019 at 9:30 am
    As a grad student you get paid by the university to work for them and tuition is paid for. Pretty sure grad students give a lot less to the university than the big pay sports programs. The notion you can’t pay them both tuition and cash is silly.
    ——
    100% right.
    My brother was a TA and he got paid while getting free Tuition. The company I worked for after school attracted me because they paid for 100% up front tuition for grad school as well as a competitive salary. All these well if you pay athletes then you can’t give them xyz is silly. This is America. If someone wants you bad enough then what you get paid is what you can negotiate. There’s no arbitrary cap. The market decides what the cap is. Why are people so against a free market solution when it comes to college athletes and compensation?

  52. When I was in college I worked as bartender and went to class. College athletes commitment to sports is so much that they cant work, but at the same time they are getting a full scholarship and they wont leave 20k in debt like I did. Alot of them dont value the class as much either since they arent paying for it, and they get by in the class based off their athletic standing, which the rest of us couldnt. If they are going to get paid they gotta be met in the middle somehow. I get the university makes a ton off them and but they shouldnt be in privileged in the class (they get priority picking and professors are more lenient with them), a free ride, and money. While the rest of the students going there are treated different by professors, have a big college bill, and have to work another job (maybe more if they have an internship) to get through the day.

  53. Anyone who says “they should have to pay their own tuition has never been a college athlete or the PARENT of a college athlete”. Have you any idea how stupid that proposal is???

    You realise these kids HAVE to go to college, before being able to turn pro and (contrary to popular belief) the school does NOT have to provide medical insurance if they get hurt playing there? So you want them to have to pay to do a ‘JOB’, in which they have no rights, that is earning someone else money, without the option skipping or avoiding it? Cool.

    Tell you what, you want the kids (and their families) to have to pay for their schooling while they’re making money for the school (and the NCAA)? Fine, then give those kids an option to skip the college system entirely, turn pro from HS and throw deuces up to the entire corrupt NCAA system!

  54. What kind of compensation are we talking about? If you are talking about a small stipend or allowing them to get a part time job like the academic scholarships are allowed I am all for it.

    If you are talking paying them 25-30K a year just for the same things they do and get now? No.

    Their housing and food is all paid for. So are books and everything else school related. Any expenses beyond that should be relatively small, after all they are college kids. Playing a sport in college is NOT a job. It is the thing that allows these kids to get a chance to get an education. If they fail to take advantage of that great opportunity, thats on them.

  55. If you throw your body around in a violent sport that can leave you permanently damaged, you had best believe there should be compensation. An education is hardly a fair trade given the revenue of this business. Let’s start compensating coal miners with books and lectures then. Think that would fly?

    —–

    It the sport is too dangerous for them, how about this: they dont take the scholarship, dont go to college, and go work in the coal mines or go to trade school.

    Sorry, you’re talking out of both sides of your mouth. If they want an education, they probably need to take the scholarship so , potentially, they can get a better job. (atlthough trade school seems to a better and better option lately). So, theres the fair trade. They get the education to kick start their lives in exchange for playing a sport for 4 years.

  56. peytonwantsaflag says:
    September 14, 2019 at 11:07 am
    Sorry, but to quote his favorite movie, The Writer’s argument does not hold water. The only athletes that really deserve to be paid are the ones that are talented enough to go professional, they are the ones that generate the income for the colleges. The remainder of the athletes are getting a quality education. Or they should be if they don’t that’s on them.
    —–
    Once again false. The only athletes that deserve to get paid are those the market says should be paid. There are plenty of players that are critical to their college teams who will never get drafted into the NBA or NFL. There are great college players who just don’t fit the NFL or NBA game. There are college players whi are fan favorites who will never make the league. How about we stop trying to tell players what we think they deserve and just let the free market system work things out like we do just about everything in this country?

  57. If they do get paid, they’re professional athletes, and other colleges that have amateur athletes should refuse to play professional football players.

  58. Look at it this way: A company hires you to work for them . Should you then be expected to pay for your work area, computer, office supplies etc?

    Tim Tebow got the rules in Florida changed to accomodate him so how did he feel about that?

    He’s entitled to his opinion like everyone else but I don’t view him as a credible messenger.

  59. Firstly, I don’t think the legislature in CA came up with a comprehensive plan. Do you only pay the stars whose jerseys sell? Do you pay all 100 kids on the team even though all don’t contribute to the revenue directly? If so, what percentage? How about men’s sports that don’t result in a net profit? Do they get a piece? Then there’s the women’s sports; If you think they won’t file lawsuits based on Title IX you’re crazy. Even if they lose the suit then you’ll have the Megan Rapinoes championing how the women’s soccer teams deserve to be paid too, because patriarchy. Everyone made to feel guilty because no one has interest in watching (and therefore generating money for) women’s (fill in the blank). Sure Baylor and UConn women’s basketball teams probably make money but most do not. The problems aren’t endless, but they are formidable.
    I just want to watch the whole thing burn. Please pay these guys, please try to only pay the revenue generators-those who will be in the NFL/NBA/MLB anyway- and see what happens. Prediction: With all the socialists on college campuses I can see infinite protests on myriad issues resulting in all kinds of unintended results. DO IT.

  60. Many college athletes aren’t very well educated before they get into college, they don’t take a full course load, and several of them take easy, useless classes. They have to spend 4 hours a day practicing, which leaves very little time for a part time job, and are more susceptible to taking money or gifts under the table.

  61. I can understand both sides of the argument. After reading through some posts though I don’t see that anyone has an idea for “fair pay”. What would be “fair pay” to these student-athletes? We talking $1,000’s a week? A month? It would take the amateurism out of the equation. We see what money does to the cream of the crop in the NFL. There are so many more college athletes compared to pro athletes. It would be chaos. How many more articles would there be of college athletes doing wrong because they have some pocket change to do it? These are kids. Judging by social media most of them aren’t very mature. If you pay them then things need to be WAY more strict. More drug tests, higher GPAs, and on top of that the athlete would owe more time to the program. Do all schools pay the same? There are more questions than answers. That’s why I personally don’t see this happening for many years. And on top of that how far does this trickle down into true amateur athletics? High school players already get recruited, now they make their choice based on pay? Then it trickles down to Jr. High. Where can I put my kid in school to have the best chance of getting paid by a high end university? Are kids/parents getting agents in elementary school? There are just too many factors people.

  62. Are they going to put in a salary cap? How do you keep the schools that pay the best from recruiting the best players? Right now, recruitment is based on the reputation of the program, not the size of the wallet. It’ll be very interesting to see how this works…….

  63. According to NCAA rules college football players are LIMITED to 20hrs/wk of pratice and game time combined, so if they’re putting in more than the 20hrs that’s a direct violation of the NCAA rules and they and the school could/should be suspended and any games during that offence could/would be forfeited including Bowl games and Championships. Secondly its against the NCAA/amateur rules for any player to receive any compension for/connected to the sport they play, that makes them professional athletes and therefore they are not eligible to play that sport in college. This is a long slippery slope and I don’t think many people realize the consequences of what all can/will happen if this passes, but they WILL!

    These players already receive tution, room & board, meals, tutoring, etc for them playing football. The school is taking a chance on those players when they give them the scholorships, they don’t know if the player(s) will live up to the expectations when the scholorship was given. So the money the college makes on these athletes is payment for that school taking a chance on the player(s).

    The money from football goes to many places other than football and its obviously something that not many supporters even think about so when/if these schools have to pay players that WILL take money away from future scholarship funds so there will be less money available to hand out for those scholarships! Also the money from college football goes to support so many other sports that don’t support themselves so what do you think will happen when most of that money is handed to the college players, any clue? Most if not all of those other sports will cease to exist, no more La Cross, track & field, swimming, water polo, volleyball, scoccer, possibily even baseball and quite a few others. You don’t really think all those sports make enough money to support themselves do you? They don’t!

    The veins of where the money goes are very far-reaching and include a whole lot more than just football, if this Pay-to-Play goes through then look to see a lot of unintended and unforeseen circumstances happening, other sports canceling programs, available scholarships for athletes will go down therefore recruiting will suffer, people losing jobs, etc, etc.

    I’ve probably just scratched the tip of the iceberg in how far-extended those circumstances will reach. I don’t think a whole lot of thought has been put into this by these politicians(who have tunnel-vision and just see a plie of cash and either want to get their fingers on it or make someone spend it) or those that support it.

    I will LMAO when/if these politicians, supporters and players do get what they want and just for starters the NCAAF suspends all of those players and schools from Playoffs and Championship games as they already said they will!

  64. I can’t believe you claim there was no coverage of this until Tebow commented. I barely follow college sports and I’ve heard this debated numerous times last week.
    As for the notion that most college athletes don’t have the opportunity to benefit in their name when they graduate. Allowing them to capitalize on their likeness is the same. Tebow could then capitalize on his likeness, but no one is buying the jersey of the center who snaps him the ball. Especially the center who will go undrsfted.

    Also,I’d expect the Josh (Rosen or Allen) that went to Wyoming (?) saw fewer of his jersey’s sold then the one that went to UCLA. If you flip them, the one at UCLA would still sell more.

    So this will steer the better players to the more popular schools, either right out of high school or via the transfer portal. The ones with an NFL future. Gone will be the days of early first round picks out of Buffalo and Wyoming.. The Tim Tebow’s and Tua’s will make some cash. Clemson’s and Alabama’s centers won’t bene at all.

  65. How many in these comments played DI sports? All these capitalist turn to socialists when the shoot fits? Do any graduate students receive stipends? How many students that are on full academic scholarships are restricted from earning extra cash? What about the walk-ons, who aren’t on scholarship? Once again, let’s restrict the right for these young women and men from earning what the market provides. I would recommend listening to the final comments of Dr. Byers, who founded the NCAA, and he insisted that this institution’s current view was steeped in a neo-plantation mentality. Coaches get paid millions and their kids attend for free. No one asks them to pay their kids tuition.

  66. California’s governor played baseball at the same mid-major school that sent Doug Cosbie, Brent Jones and Bryan Barker to the NFL (which scrapped the sport in 1993). He’s also an alum of the same high school as Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll

  67. Tim tebow only feels that way because he was a horrible NFL qb….ppl are so passionate about college football. Ummm no. No matter what you think the NFL gets the most ratings by farrrr . And the NFL is a juggernaut bro.

  68. robertgriffintheturd says:
    September 14, 2019 at 5:58 pm
    States should tax all athletic scholarships then use the revenue to pay the players. It would be a wash and the players would learn that nothing is free.

    1 0 Rate This


    Do states tax any other scholarships? Did you get taxed on any grants or scholarships you received (assuming you went to college)?

  69. Pay them and then tax them on that pay, tax them on the value of the scholarship, the free food and room and medical care and all the other things athletes get.

    They should be taxed on those transfers. Pay your fair share!

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