Chase Young says NCAA sidelined him for a loan from a family friend

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The fair market value for Ohio State defensive end Chase Young’s services is likely upwards of $20 million a year: Young is so talented that if he could walk into the NFL today as a free agent, some team would probably offer him a contract rivaling that of the league’s highest-paid defensive end, DeMarcus Lawrence, who signed a five-year, $105 million deal this year.

Unfortunately for Young, when your chosen career is football, you don’t get to shop your services on the free market. First you have to go through a three-year NCAA apprenticeship, and if you take a penny from any outside source, you’re in trouble.

That’s what Young says happened, and why he’s sidelined for tomorrow’s game against Maryland.

“Unfortunately, I won’t be playing this week because of an NCAA eligibility issue,” Young said in a statement. “I made a mistake last year by accepting a loan from a family friend I’ve known since the summer before my freshman year at OSU. I repaid it in full last summer and I’m working with the University and the NCAA to get back on the field as soon as possible.”

If Young’s account is accurate, he’s the latest in a long line of athletes who have discovered that the benefits of capitalism don’t apply to those who play college sports. Sure, Young is the best player in the Big Ten this year, and the Big Ten has a six-year, $2.64 billion deal to show its games on FOX and ESPN. And sure, Young is expected to lead Ohio State to the College Football Playoff, and ESPN is paying $7.3 billion over 12 years to show the College Football Playoff. But why should Young see any of that money?

And, of course, the NCAA’s actions go far beyond just preventing Young from seeing any of that money. No one is alleging that Ohio State spent some of its share of that TV revenue on paying Young directly. All Young is accused of doing is accepting a loan from a family friend, a loan he paid back. But the NCAA doesn’t even allow athletes to take out any loans that any other student doesn’t get. Not only does Young not see any of that $10 billion from the Big Ten TV deal and the College Football Playoff TV deal, he’s not even allowed to get a loan that someone outside the NCAA is happy to give him, knowing that his future NFL earnings make him a safe bet to pay it back.

When Young enters the NFL draft next year, his earnings will again be constrained because he has to take the contract that corresponds with his draft slot, rather than shop his services to the highest bidder among all 32 NFL teams. But next year, at least, he’ll be making real money: If he’s a Top 5 pick, as expected, he’ll be guaranteed more than $30 million over his first four years.

In the NCAA, he gets only the value of his Ohio State scholarship, and he gets to have the NCAA scrutinize his private life for any sign that he might have made any money anywhere else.

88 responses to “Chase Young says NCAA sidelined him for a loan from a family friend

  1. It is unfathomable to me that some capitalist hasn’t started a football league that competes against the NCAA for talent. It’s going to happen. It’ll blow up when it does.

  2. Them’s the rules that all players are to abide by…he didn’t (allegedly)…I’ll be curious if Ohio State will have to forfeit games he played in…

  3. Oh all of us who had to take out student loans that are hard to pay back and then have to work 40 years before you retire feel so bad for him…

  4. Ok I can see how a personal loan can get out of hand. Suppose it comes from a booster. But the NCAA should be able to look at the individual circumstances. Are they saying my aunt can’t give me a loan to help out with college?

    “But the NCAA doesn’t even allow athletes to take out any loans that any other student doesn’t get. ”

    So the NCAA is saying other students don’t get loans from family friends. Break up this mafia right now and let the kids earn.

  5. There is something to be said on both sides of this equation.The athlete is receiving a college scholarship and…NFL Mktng exposure , which is worth a great deal of capital.The College and NCAA is earning a huge sum of money for putting the teams on the field and TV broadcasting..I believe both parties should meet somewhere in the middle of financial equitability, that should be worked out in a negotiation process. That is the fair way to handle this financial dilemma.

  6. Damn that is eight years before you get to make what your worth. (Ten if they franchise you twice)

    A lot can happen in eight years.

  7. Yep, my heart bleeds for a 20 year old who stands to make many millions of dollars before he is 25 because he can’t play in a game against powerhouse (sarcasm) Maryland. Chances are, when The Ohio State Buckeyes make it to a bowl game, he will choose not to play to avoid the chance of injury, and no one on PFT will criticize that decision.

    He “only” gets the value of his scholarship? Almost $30,000 a year! That is about a third of what I earn in a year, and I have managed to put 2 children through college in PA state schools (at out of state rates), without borrowing a penny. Unfortunately, neither of my children have more than average athletic skills and they are not likely to make $20 million in their lives, much less over the next decade.

    Cry me a river…

  8. “accepting a loan from a family friend I’ve known since the summer before my freshman year at OSU”

    Interesting timing. Becomes a family friend right before he enrolls at OSU. This is how most family friends come about in Columbus.

  9. The NCAA is a joke and these guys should be able to do something as simple as taking out a loan. Still, if I were the NCAA, I’d be curious about how he was able to pay off the loan.

  10. Unfortunately if these loans were allowed, shoe companies would pay family members who in turn would “loan” the money to players. Not that that would necessarily be wrong. But if you’re of the position that athletes can’t be paid, as the NCAA is, then it’s a slippery slope to allow loans of any kind.

  11. The NCAA is as corrupt as they come. Are their rules utterly unfair? Of course. But that’s not the real problem. The problem is the interests of the people who make those rules. Their many committees are made up of university employees, namely athletic directors, college presidents, vice presidents, etc. The Board of Directors is almost exclusively Presidents and Chancellors. Nearly all of these people are pre-disposed to oppose paying athletes or letting them make any money on their own. They aren’t about to share a dime of TV or sponsor revenue from their institutions/the NCAA. This is big business we’re talking about! Real change is probably going to take years of a major legal effort.

  12. doesnt matter what the ncaa makes. he doesnt have to go into the NCAA in any capacity if he wants to play in the NFL. All he has to do is be 3 years removed from High school. Go play in Canada for 3 years or in another professional organization. Or, get a free top notch education while playing the game you love

  13. Everyone saying they get a “top notch education” or “free college” are cracking me up. Big time athletes can only take certain classes with a low chance of actually getting a degree.

  14. So it’s OK for Auburn to pay Cam Newton’s dad $100k+ to get Cam to go to Auburn but taking and repaying a loan from a friend is not allowed.

  15. NCAA is a money scam plain and simple. They have these players exactly were they want them, super talented money makers who don’t get paid at all. And that is fine, they get a scholarship, so the college knows exactly where their cash cow is sleeping and eating, but to discipline a star athlete who takes out a loan before school even started and paid it back in full, that is ridiculous.

  16. What does a guy with a full-ride scholarship need a loan for?

    Can’t say I have sympathy for the soon-to-be-filthy-rich college stars. So what if they have to serve an apprenticeship for a few years before they can make mega-millions? That’s not hardship. Being on the football team and being an alum of a major university opens doors to you for life. He’ll always have a connection to opportunity that others don’t have, even if he never plays a down of NFL football.

    So yes – he’s already gotten something of enormous, lifelong value before that big NFL contract arrives. This notion that star athletes are forced to do something for nothing is a crock.

    I support athletes being able to make money off of their own names, but beyond that, not going to see people with enormous privilege as victims.

  17. Young should simply say that he understands the NCAA’s position and that in light of it, he no longer wishes to be part of the NCAA.

    If you’re good at something, never do it for free.

  18. Football players on scholarship have to spend 20 hours a week practicing, and have very little time to work a part time job. In the past many of them had no-show jobs where they could make a little money or got some kind of under-the-table payments or freebies from boosters. A large number of them enter college with only a basic education, and aren’t taking a full course of classes, or are taking remedial classes. Most of them aren’t going to college to earn a degree, they are there to become professional football players. So for many of them these scholarships are basically worthless.

  19. It took me 17 years to pay off my student loans and I’ll make a small fraction of that 30 million dollars over the course of my career so I guess I have difficulty feeling too bad for the guy

  20. Tiffani says:
    November 8, 2019 at 11:15 am
    Oh all of us who had to take out student loans that are hard to pay back and then have to work 40 years before you retire feel so bad for him…
    —–
    Ok, now imagine if you got in trouble for taking that loan. . . .

  21. lol@ lionsfan. thats a sad excuse bud. The Chiefs have an offensive lineman who was pre-med in college and still takes courses in the offseason. If you prioritize your education over other nonsense then anything is possible. Are you really saying NFL athletes are incapable of finishing college?

  22. First: This is why everyone hates the NCAA. This is silly. He got a loan from a friend. He paid it back. Where’s the problem? The NCAA is their own worst enemy in the PR fight over stuff like this.

    But I will say on the “evil NCAA won’t pay them” front:

    The out-of-state (he’s from Maryland) cost of attending OSU is about 40,000 a year or so. If he only attends three years, that’s $120,000 he’s not having to spend for the privilege.

    So for three years, he gets to a platform where he can audition essentially free of charge for a job that will pay him millions.

    By any measure, that’s a pretty sweet deal.

  23. Maybe the NCAA could offer loans to athletes at low interest. That would avoid the issue of crossing the line of “professional”.
    ____________________________________________

    This is one of the more absurd suggestions I’ve seen in awhile. The NCAA is not a bank. In what bizarro world would they ever want to give a bunch of 18-21 year old football players money in hopes of getting paid back? Oh and there is this pesky thing called Title IX. So if they give a football player money they need to give the female volleyball player money too.

    Think before you type.

  24. Of course NFL teams will now want to offer him lots of money since he proved himself the last 2 years via his play at OSU. I don’t think any team would have wanted to give him that $100 million dollar deal coming out of HS.

    Not saying the NCAA system is fair, because its not. However, aside from soccer leagues outside the US, there is no sport that allows you to just sell yourself to the highest bidding team as a youth. Every US sport has some form of draft, not just football.

  25. Hey man, can I borrow $10 for lunch? I’m low on cash.
    ——
    College athletes get free room and board. That includes all meals and professional nutritionists. The cafeterias (even at the smaller mid major schools) are super impressive.

    All the college athletes that i knew never complained. They thought they had it made. They all took classes they may not have taken w/o a scholarship because they had free access to top flight tutors. It seems like the only ones that complain about college are the guys that are going to get drafted high. That seems completely backwards to me.

  26. lionsfan54 says:
    November 8, 2019 at 11:39 am
    Everyone saying they get a “top notch education” or “free college” are cracking me up. Big time athletes can only take certain classes with a low chance of actually getting a degree.

    I went to school on a baseball scholarship, degree in Mechanical Engineering. Most posters talk about the .1% of the athletes that “may” be considerably more value, but would 100% state that the value of my degree has vastly outweighed the issue that I played baseball for four years with no other compensation than provided by the scholarship

  27. Can someone tell us how is NCAA so good at finding out if a student athlete took a personal loan , are they running credit checks, do they have crack collection agencies working for them, are these athletes being baited in a sting operation

    Maybe we can use their skills to solve bigger problems

  28. “In the NCAA, he gets only the value of his Ohio State scholarship”
    ————————

    – Playing for Ohio, he’s had name-brand exposure to MILLIONS of built-in Buckeye fans hyping him up. Try playing in DIII – he’d go undrafted.

    – At Ohio, he’s giving top-notch coaching to tranform a talented, but VERY RAW high schooler into a potential NFL player.

  29. Those people saying are the rules you may want to understand the absolute hypocrisy of the NCAA. Band and instrument students on scholarship have always been able to play side music gigs on the weekend and accept money, but annathlete cant take out a loan of any type. What a joke.

    PS I am not a OSU fan.

  30. Move on, nothing to see here. The suits have always controlled the money. Why should they do something like voluntarily share the pot of gold with the employees who generate it? Why that would be socialism or communism or one of those ‘isms’ that redistributes wealth, actually putting it into the hands of the people who earn it.

    That’s down right un-American. Paying people who work is such an outdated concept. Eventually it will happen, but it will literally take an act of congress. A dream team of attorneys, will one day take this to court (pro bono) and shut down the NCAA,as we know it.

    Employees should get paid according to what the market will bear.(fair market value) For decades those kids have made a lot of people rich. Coaches, administrators, TV…everybody shares in the profit, but the workers. Nice setup, huh?

  31. I can’t sympathize with people who have the potential to earn hundreds of millions of dollars. I see these complaints where college athletes should get paid on their way to being millionaires. Then, the same people shame anyone who wants to make a buck through capitalism. Then they complain about the poor and homeless. I don’t get the argument.

    These players get a first class ride to first class universities and can get a first class education. That’s not enough? Why? Because a university gets tv money and bowl money? Why not just forget college football and let the nfl draft these kids out of high school? Oh, wait. Most of the players need the free college and free press to get noticed and it wouldn’t be fair for those who make their mark in college. Pffft.

    Play or quit and go work at wherever you can get a job. Punch that clock every day like normal people have to do. There isn’t pro football money in it, but it’s a living

  32. “Damn that is eight years before you get to make what your worth. (Ten if they franchise you twice)”

    Yeah not sure how 30 million for the first 4 years of rookie contract that can be renegotiated after the first 3 is “not getting to make what you’re worth”, and same for the franchise tags years where DEs get paid huge. He’ll be set for life as soon as he signs that rookie deal as long as he’s not an idiot with the money.

  33. He would not get anywhere close to $105M right now. He looks dominant in College. Robert Nkemdiche looked dominant, too.

  34. “Young should simply say that he understands the NCAA’s position and that in light of it, he no longer wishes to be part of the NCAA.”

    There you go. If he can enter the draft next off season and he’s that hot a prospect, why risk getting injured for the wankers at the NCAA?

    I think the NCAA is already feeling a little heat from players refusing to play in bowl games, if they back out halfway through their 3rd year when they know they’ll get drafted high, that will turn up the temperature all the more on the NCAA

  35. The NCAA clearly needs to then establish their own controlled bank where players can borrow a meager couple of dollars if they need to. Free room and board and meals is not the end-all solution to money needs.

  36. NCAA looks like there being tough on the kid, to set an example. When the reality is they knew, marketed OSU games, made money, and are now worried questions will be asked of them if the information gets out. So reprimand the kid for a meaningless game to prove their not corrupt.

  37. Get out now..prepare for the NFL Combine and pick your suit out as you are going to be selected top 3 in the 2020 NFL Draft.

  38. The out-of-state (he’s from Maryland) cost of attending OSU is about 40,000 a year or so. If he only attends three years, that’s $120,000 he’s not having to spend for the privilege.

    So for three years, he gets to a platform where he can audition essentially free of charge for a job that will pay him millions.

    By any measure, that’s a pretty sweet deal.

    OSU holds 105,000 a game and usually has 6-7 home games a year. Not to mention the PSL and membership cost to even be able to buy those season tickets. One home game pays for 3 years of full ride scholarships for the entire team. These universities are making money hand over fist off the backs of these kids

  39. If you don’t like the NCAA don’t participate. That simple. Don’t join an organization you don’t like then demand they change to fit your style and have the government step in and force change. That’s oppression and taking away freedoms. The NCAA should be free to have their own set of rules for their organization, just like you’re free to not join that organization and pursue other options or create other options. Go play in Canada, the XFL, arena, start your own league, but don’t cry cause you didn’t always get what you want.

  40. Just drop a bag of money off at their dorm room door like in Blue chips. No paper trail, no questions. Full ride scholarship doesnt mean they cover every aspect of your life.

  41. Band and instrument students on scholarship have always been able to play side music gigs
    ——
    The musicians don’t have to maintain amateur status. An athletic scholarship is a contract. Part of that contract is that you pledge to maintain amateur status. Nobody has to accept the scholarship. They don’t have to sign the contract. They can take a job and work on their own and try to make it to the pros in 3 years after they graduate without the NCAA.

    You see fans all the time commenting on how the pros should honor the contract they signed. And that nobody forced them to sign it. The same goes for the high school kid that is going off to college. The high school kids hold press conferences to announce who they are signing with. They look ecstatic when they sign their contracts to play college sports.

  42. This sort of thing is why people despise the NCAA. Regular college students are free to borrow money on whatever terms they can negotiate. The NCAA says it wants athletes to be like regular college students but then cracks down if they find a way to make money. Remember the UNLV point guard with a real estate license? He gave up his college scholarship so the NCAA changed the rules to try to keep him off the floor as a “walk on”.

  43. “These universities are making money hand over fist off the backs of these kids”

    And a good chunk of that money goes to pay for athletes in sports where the participants do not stand to make millions.

    Again, cry me a river.

  44. The first thing that needs to go is the mandatory rookie wage scale and mandatory 4 year rookie contract. Let the player negotiate a fair-market value. Next, individuals must have the right to market their own likeness, which it appears the NCAA will be allowing soon.

  45. factschecker says:
    November 8, 2019 at 11:59 am
    Hey man, can I borrow $10 for lunch? I’m low on cash.
    ——
    College athletes get free room and board. That includes all meals and professional nutritionists. The cafeterias (even at the smaller mid major schools) are super impressive.

    All the college athletes that i knew never complained. They thought they had it made. They all took classes they may not have taken w/o a scholarship because they had free access to top flight tutors. It seems like the only ones that complain about college are the guys that are going to get drafted high. That seems completely backwards to me.
    ——————————————————————————

    Not every athlete is on a free ride program that covers all expenses. The far majority have some or most of their tuition paid, but have to pay all other expenses (room, board, books,etc). Yet they are still held to the same NCAA rules.

    Doesn’t seem so backward now, does it?

  46. NCAA is a joke. They milk college athletes for every penny they can, and then try to take some sort of high road and act like they’re not just a business. Young should shut it down and wait for the NFL draft to cash in on being a top 5 pick.

  47. TribeOfOne:

    Drug-testing, academic eligibility, professional status, yes the NCAA can certainly regulate who plays and that’s fine. But to audit the individual’s life outside of the sport to ensure they aren’t making money from their own likeness is ridiculous.

    Some of these kids have a talent that is worth millions, but they have to risk their health for nothing for 3 years in order to actually extract value from that talent. They have everything they need to be successful at the next level, but because of arbitrary rules they have to risk it all for free. The difference between an NFL lifestyle and that of someone who got injured and never made a dime is considerable.

  48. Our country isn’t perfect, but it’s the best country in the world. If guys don’t want to make a living in pro football, there are other jobs available. I’d like to see how many NFL players have the job skills to quit playing football, and get a higher paying job. If the NFL wasn’t being run the way it’s being run, those players wouldn’t be making the kind of money they’re making. These guys, if they have half a brain, can play in the NFL for 2 years and be able to set themselves financially for life.

  49. Not every athlete is on a free ride program that covers all expenses. The far majority have some or most of their tuition paid, but have to pay all other expenses (room, board, books,etc). Yet they are still held to the same NCAA rules.
    ——
    If you are playing D1 college basketball or football,then yes. Yes you are getting all the bells and whistles. That’s part of the rules.

    DII and DIII you’d be correct. I don’t even think they get a scholarship? I believe those are 100% out of pocket.

  50. We can debate all day long whether NCAA rules are fair or unfair, or what changes the NCAA should or shouldn’t make. But as usual, most of what I’m reading here conveniently sidesteps the real issues, which are character and accountability.
    Should the rules be changed? Most definitely, in my opinion. But they haven’t been changed yet. Bottom line: Like them or not, agree with them or not, they exist. Recruits are made aware of them, and agree to follow them when they sign on the dotted line and accept a scholarship.
    Taking a stand often requires self-sacrifice. If you think the current rules are unfair then stay true to your principles and don’t accept the scholarship. But once you do accept, violating them is on you. Self-serving protestations after the fact ring hollow, and don’t absolve you from paying the penalty for you willful choices.
    It’s the new way: Agree to anything to get what you want, then cry foul when someone holds you accountable.

  51. Packers291

    Lamelo Ball is playing in Australia and getting paid before he enters the draft. Nothing forcing you to go get an education while you play the game you love. You have other options besides NCAA. You’re risking yourself in highschool ball too. Canada pays, arena pays, XFL pays… Nobody forcing them to have the time of their life in college and play ball.

  52. I’m wondering what the anti-NCAA folks think it costs to put a kid though Ohio State, feed him the gourmet meals that are prepared for him, clothe him, fly him to away games, and put him up in hotels the night before every game…..

  53. Tiffani says:
    November 8, 2019 at 11:15 am
    Oh all of us who had to take out student loans that are hard to pay back and then have to work 40 years before you retire feel so bad for him…

    ————–

    Well you should’ve been better at football then.

  54. before the NBA and NFL became so high dollar. they were happy to get an education(books room and board) for playing football, basketball or MBing. You don’t walk out of Junior High decide you are gonna be a pro and the wait to become a high NFL pick or lottery pick in the NBA. somewhere you have to PROVE you can play something besides Madden!

  55. Some athletes have families and children.
    What does the almighty NCAA expect them to do for money to cover costs associated with raising a family while in college?

  56. factschecker says:

    DII and DIII you’d be correct. I don’t even think they get a scholarship? I believe those are 100% out of pocket.
    Direct from the NCAA site:
    “NCAA Divisions I and II schools provide more than $2.9 billion in athletics scholarships annually to more than 150,000 student-athletes. Division III schools do not offer athletics scholarships.”

    “Full scholarships cover tuition and fees, room, board and course-related books. Most student-athletes who receive athletics scholarships receive an amount covering a portion of these costs.”

    So…these athletes still need money for other expenses, but are held to the same rules as those on full ride scholarships.

  57. dryzzt23 says: “Some athletes have families and children. What does the almighty NCAA expect them to do for money to cover costs associated with raising a family while in college?”
    ————————–

    Nice try. Student athletes are allowed to work regular jobs outside of their sport. In fact, they can play another sport professionally (say NHL hockey) and still be NCAA-eligible for college basketball.

  58. Yep, my heart bleeds for a 20 year old who stands to make many millions of dollars before he is 25 because he can’t play in a game against powerhouse (sarcasm) Maryland. Chances are, when The Ohio State Buckeyes make it to a bowl game, he will choose not to play to avoid the chance of injury, and no one on PFT will criticize that decision.

    He “only” gets the value of his scholarship? Almost $30,000 a year! That is about a third of what I earn in a year, and I have managed to put 2 children through college in PA state schools (at out of state rates), without borrowing a penny. Unfortunately, neither of my children have more than average athletic skills and they are not likely to make $20 million in their lives, much less over the next decade.

    Cry me a river…
    _____________________________________________________
    These are the people I find amusing. This whole woe is me crap in terms of I had to struggle to get through college and you were on a full ride, and got a free education yada yada yada…but is never said that in big time college football how much of that revenue went to the new law school building or the medical center etc? If its that big of a deal why doesn’t your university just end football? I’ll tell you why…BECAUSE IT GENERATES BILLIONS OF DOLLARS FOR THE UNIVERSITY SO THEY CAN PAY FOR SOME OF THE AMENITIES YOU ENJOYED WITH YOUR STUDENT LOANS.

  59. Colleges need to get out of sports altogether. The NFL surely can afford a minor league system like MLB or NHL. Why even fake that these players aren’t paid under the table. What a joke.

  60. packers291 says: “Some of these kids have a talent that is worth millions, but they have to risk their health for nothing for 3 years in order to actually extract value from that talent. They have everything they need to be successful at the next level, but because of arbitrary rules they have to risk it all for free.”
    ———————–

    Not out of high school, they weren’t. NCAA numbers:

    1,036,842 high schoolers play football
    > 73,557 then played DI, DII or DIII (7.1%)
    >> of those NCAA students, 15,346 were draft eligible for 256 picks (0.000247%)

    So please tell me how many “talented” high schoolers FAILED to even succeed in college against boys? The failure rate from high school star to NFL superstar “worth millions” is enormous. You seriously think a star NFL football player got all the skills coming out of HS??? Yikes.

  61. I can remember being a student at Ohio State years ago and my football friend and I were at McDonalds and his bank card didnt work and i couldnt even pay for his cheap $5 meal due to the NCAA rules. What crap is this.

  62. buckeyefaninhiding says:
    November 8, 2019 at 3:22 pm

    I can remember being a student at Ohio State years ago and my football friend and I were at McDonalds and his bank card didnt work and i couldnt even pay for his cheap $5 meal due to the NCAA rules. What crap is this.
    _______________________________________________________________________________________

    Well, when said friend, who he just met before his freshman year at OSU, is a certified NFLPA agent…

  63. Just let these young men play pro football as soon as they turn 18. They are wearing out their bodies and risking permanent injury playing college ball. Those that believe a college scholarship is worth more than an NFL paycheck will have a choice.

  64. There is more than meets the eye here. As previously mentioned, you met this “family friend” the summer before you started at Ohio State, so already in the thick of the recruiting cycle. And most likely this “family friend” who is also surely a “friend of the university and football program” has already recommended an agent for you, just out of the kindness of his heart. I mean cmon.

  65. When NFL players eventually retire with a few million in the bank, that college education is the difference between being broke in a couple years, and being wealthy the rest of your life. Oh that evil NCAA.

  66. daramsman says:
    November 8, 2019 at 2:41 pm

    Kolo Jezdec says:
    November 8, 2019 at 11:25 am

    Yep, my heart bleeds for a 20 year old who stands to make many millions of dollars before he is 25 because he can’t play in a game against powerhouse (sarcasm) Maryland. Chances are, when The Ohio State Buckeyes make it to a bowl game, he will choose not to play to avoid the chance of injury, and no one on PFT will criticize that decision.

    He “only” gets the value of his scholarship? Almost $30,000 a year! That is about a third of what I earn in a year, and I have managed to put 2 children through college in PA state schools (at out of state rates), without borrowing a penny. Unfortunately, neither of my children have more than average athletic skills and they are not likely to make $20 million in their lives, much less over the next decade.

    Cry me a river…
    _____________________________________________________
    These are the people I find amusing. This whole woe is me crap in terms of I had to struggle to get through college and you were on a full ride, and got a free education yada yada yada…but is never said that in big time college football how much of that revenue went to the new law school building or the medical center etc? If its that big of a deal why doesn’t your university just end football? I’ll tell you why…BECAUSE IT GENERATES BILLIONS OF DOLLARS FOR THE UNIVERSITY SO THEY CAN PAY FOR SOME OF THE AMENITIES YOU ENJOYED WITH YOUR STUDENT LOANS.
    ——————
    You must have missed the part where I clearly stated that I did not borrow a penny to put my kids through college, nor did I borrow any money to get through college. I worked for over a decade, saved my money and paid my own way through college in my early 30s. Glad you find people like me amusing, though. Always happy to make people smile…

  67. Ikidyounot says:
    November 8, 2019 at 11:49 am
    Football players on scholarship have to spend 20 hours a week practicing, and have very little time to work a part time job.

    Actually, NCAA athletes are prohibited from having part time jobs during the season.

  68. charliecharger says:
    November 8, 2019 at 5:44 pm
    When NFL players eventually retire with a few million in the bank, that college education is the difference between being broke in a couple years, and being wealthy the rest of your life. Oh that evil NCAA.
    —————
    I didn’t think they were people this naïve left in the world

  69. I am so tired of hearing the bottom kissing of these athletes in college who “don’t get paid”. They are paid…to the tune of 60-100 k per year depending on the school. They get their tuition, room and board, meal money, training and the best health care, nutrition and tutoring. All things most kids have to pay themselves and go in debt to do so many times. Get past the major programs and places like Jackson State don’t make a ton of money. Please stop with this crap about them not getting paid. maybe you did not have to pay your tuition but I and many others have and it wasn’t cheap.

  70. If your argument is that someone so young should not be getting so much money you are just jealous. These players are uniqley gifted with god given athletic ability. You were not so gifted. If you argue football players are getting are “free ride” you are right only if your definition of “free ride” involves a chance of being permanently injured.

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