NFL projects 2020 salary cap in range of $196.8M – $201.2M

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The salary cap will go up again in 2020.

That was the word from league meetings on Tuesday. The NFL has informed teams that they project the salary cap will be in the range of $196.8 million to $201.2 million for next season.

The salary cap for the 2019 season is 188.2 million, which makes it likely that the cap will go up at least $10 million for the seventh consecutive season. Projected player costs, including benefits, for the 2020 season will be more than $7.7 billion.

Wherever the number lands, it will represent a massive jump from the $120 million cap in 2011, which is an increase of roughly 65 percent.

That was the first year of the Collective Bargaining Agreement that expires in 2020. Talks on a new CBA are ongoing between the NFL and NFLPA and there’s hope that the two sides can avoid the work stoppage like there was in 2011, but it remains to be seen if that will be the case.

27 responses to “NFL projects 2020 salary cap in range of $196.8M – $201.2M

  1. Since the salary cap keeps rising but the roster size has stayed the same a smart agent out there has got to soon propose a contract that’s not x years for y million, but x years at y % of the cap

  2. Star athletes in any sport are not underpaid. But consider the ‘average’ NFL player that plays 3 years, a generous estimate. Again to be generous let’s say somehow they earn 5 million dollars in those 3 years. That turns out to be about $125K a year for 40 years, which is again a conservative estimate of how many years any one person may work before retiring.

    Considering all the physical damge they put their bodies for, it’s not really that much money. Obviously it’s a bit of an oversimplification, but I think you get the point. Star athletes are paid handsomely. Regular Joe’s not quite that much.

  3. “And these athletes think their underpaid
    compared to what the owners are making, they are”

    The athletes also don’t have billions of dollars tied up in the team, the owners ought to make more. The argument that athletes risk injuries that can cripple them for life is no different than me going to work, the same could easily happen to me. Even if I win a big lawsuit due to an life changing injury at work, the pay out for me would be less than most of their yearly pay checks. The athletes play a game, I actually work for a living.

  4. jag95

    I get that, but they are making close to 10 billion annually, I am not saying the “employees” deserve that kind of money, but the employers could certainly share the pie a little more without it effecting them much. Also, unless you or I are building skyscrapers or crabbing in Alaska, they do have a bigger risk than most employees. Not saying you are wrong, but there certainly is more pie to share. C’est la vie, most likely most folk won’t see what these guys make in a year or two i a lifetime, so, yeah, tough to feel sorry for them

  5. Perhaps the NFL could invest some additional money into the officiating. For example, training courses on how to watch a replay and determine if pass interference has occurred.

  6. “ Also, unless you or I are building skyscrapers or crabbing in Alaska, they do have a bigger risk than most employees”

    I work in West Texas oil fields my job is substantially more dangerous than theirs, and CEO ‘s in my industry make big $$$, but not me. So I can put myself in their shoes.

  7. I work in West Texas oil fields my job is substantially more dangerous than theirs, and CEO ‘s in my industry make big $$$, but not me. So I can put myself in their shoes

    Oh, so you are an entertainer as well? That’s what professional athletes are- they generate revenue for themselves and thier employers by thier performances, which people buy. You can’t put yourself in anyone’s shoes, except maybe an East Texas oil field employee.

  8. jagfansince95 says:
    December 10, 2019 at 5:20 pm
    “And these athletes think their underpaid
    compared to what the owners are making, they are”
    The athletes also don’t have billions of dollars tied up in the team, the owners ought to make more. The argument that athletes risk injuries that can cripple them for life is no different than me going to work, the same could easily happen to me. Even if I win a big lawsuit due to an life changing injury at work, the pay out for me would be less than most of their yearly pay checks. The athletes play a game, I actually work for a living.
    —————————————————————————————-
    Your job is just as dangerous. Just as anything can happen to you at any moment. Anything can happen to somebody crashing into another person for a living at any moment. Look at the John Ross situation. You also aren’t an entertainer, nobody pays to see you do your job, and you didn’t have to go to college for employment. They can’t put themselves in your shoes because their feet are much larger. You also have to be one of the best in your field to command a similar salary. There’s only one NFL. There are plenty of oil rigs.

  9. clownofdust says:
    December 10, 2019 at 6:09 pm
    How about funneling that money into making it possible for an average joe to enjoy a football game with his kids for under $500?
    ——————————————————————————————–A person with kids who wants to see a football game should be able to pay to see one. Otherwise watch at home.

  10. It’s not that your supposed to feel sorry for professional athletes, but logic should tell you that they should be making substantially more money in a billion dollar industry that’s extraordinarily small. Average joes work regular jobs that anyone could work and a lot don’t have prerequisites like three years of college and such. These guys are 1 in a million talents who not only have to play a life-threatening game, but have other obligations representing the organization such as media availability, charity work etc. The list of demands are much more than physical.

  11. The NFL team from Washington can now overpay more for their often injured collection of misfits while whining that winnning more than three games with that clown of a QB is just unfair. I propose that Washington immediately give the clown prince of multi-flavored interceptions the salary that Kirk Cousins commanded by actually throwing the ball downfield for over 4,000 yards in multiple years. Pay da man!

  12. Wow, a 20% benefit rate on top of salaries. I am sure the pension is $10-20 million a year alone, if not greater. Already reaching point where individual players are making more per year than some teams do (just based off GB Packers financial info and surely there are some teams that make less than them). Get ready for higher priced tix, parking, merchandise, and concessions.

  13. With an active roster of 53 and a PS of 10, plus injuries, let’s assume 75 guys get paid by each team. So over 32 teams that’s 2,400 guys. Splitting $7.7B that’s $3.2M each. Not bad (on average).

    To compare to the owners is ridiculous. The risk profile and capital requirement is apples to oranges.

    Also, I love when people get wealth envy and their socialist tendencies get exposed. It’s not fair that other people have more money than I do. They should just give it to me. Wah!

  14. delfines72 says:
    December 10, 2019 at 5:15 pm
    Star athletes in any sport are not underpaid. But consider the ‘average’ NFL player that plays 3 years, a generous estimate.
    _____________________________

    And “consider the ‘average’ NFL player that plays 3yrs also includes every player drafted that doesn’t make a teams opening day roster so it is a very skewed and misleading statistic! Actually the average for a player that makes a team as a rookie is 6yrs, the average for a 1st round draft pick is 9.3yrs and for a player that makes at least one Pro Bowl its 11.7yrs. The 3.3yr stat includes a whole lot of players that never see a regular season game and that and average of 140 players a year!

  15. I love when people get oligarchist and demean people who want EVERYONE to get their fair share of wealth because no one needs all of the wealth to live, as if hoping for a better life for all humanity makes you an enemy or “socialist”. It’s not wealth envy, it’s not being pure evil and crying that ‘socialists” would handle wealth better than the greedy wealthy handle it all for themselves.

  16. Bagoon Stevens says:
    December 10, 2019 at 4:56 pm

    And these athletes think their underpaid
    compared to what the owners are making, they are

    ———-

    as it should be, they are employees. when you are flipping burgers should you make as much as the owner?

  17. Poor money problems on both the players and owners part. I don’t care. Give me a product I enjoy for MY entertainment dollar. The NFL is failing in that regard because of excess penalties,slowness of the game,and the watered down talent on the field. They better listen to their customers before they find another way to spend their money.

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