Controversial blindside block from Bills-Texans game draws a fine

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The NFL’s discipline process for on-field infractions from time to time falls victim to considerations unrelated to whether discipline of a certain type is warranted. It looks like it has happened again this week, twice.

The first example came from the decision of the league office to not fine Seahawks defensive end Jadeveon Clowney for what appeared to be a blatant violation of the rule against lowering the helmet to initiate contact with an opponent, for the hit that knocked Eagles quarterback Carson Wentz out of Sunday’s wild-card game. But since no penalty was called, a fine would have been characterized as an admission that the officials made a mistake.

The second example comes from the decision of the league office to fine Bills right tackle Cody Ford $28,075 for a blindside block that knocked Buffalo out of range for a potential game-winning field goal in overtime. The officials flagged Ford, prompting a widespread outcry — including a claim from former NFL V.P. of officiating Mike Pereira that it was a bad call.

So, quite possibly, the controversial non-call didn’t draw a fine in order to bolster the perceived accuracy of the non-call, and the controversial call drew a fine in order to bolster the perceived accuracy of the call.

Advantage, Clowney. Disadvantage, Ford.

55 responses to “Controversial blindside block from Bills-Texans game draws a fine

  1. What a joke. Clowney gets nothing. Got away with a facemask by nearly ripping Foles head off too. Funny how he told Peters “my bad” and then to the media starts playing victim about Eagles fans.

  2. What a joke. Clowney gets nothing. Got away with a facemask by nearly ripping Foles head off too. Funny how he told Peters “my bad” and then to the media starts playing victim about Eagles fans.

  3. The call against Cody Ford was preposterous. Usually the officials let the players play – think about offensive PI at the end of the Vikings/Saints game. Next year is another year, but it still sucks to have a bad call have such an impact in OT.

  4. Stop whining about Clowney. It was a clean hit, period. Stop watching slow-mo. In real time, it is a clean football play. Nobody cared about it during the game, Wentz played 6 more snaps before taking himself out, then everyone started replaying it. Stop.

  5. So, quite possibly, the controversial non-call didn’t draw a fine in order to bolster the perceived accuracy of the non-call, and the controversial call drew a fine in order to bolster the perceived accuracy of the call.

    Advantage, Clowney. Disadvantage, Ford.

    ================

    Pretty much sums it up. That blindside call very likely was the difference in the game and make no mistake, it was a horrible call.

  6. Blindside blocks are FUN! Nowadays you can’t tattoo someone really good in a football game without drawing a flag and/or a fine.
    All because the same people who demanded a “touchy- feely” military have succeeded in doing the same thing to football.
    Let men be MEN!
    SMH

  7. “the controversial non-call didn’t draw a fine in order to bolster the perceived accuracy of the non-call”

    I said it last Sunday that there wouldn’t be a fined for that reason. Watch his hit’s tomorrow. He will try to take out Rodgers. He won’t even care if he gets fined, if it gets Seattle to the NFC championship game.

  8. It was a bad call and there should be no fine.

    Clowney’s hit was clean though, the 2 situations have nothing to do with each other

  9. Seriously? Were you watching with a blind fold on?! Launches with his helmet right into Wentz’s helmet and drives him in the ground forcing his head with force to the ground. Posters that say this is a clean is plain ignorance.

  10. I am not comparing one to the other (Clowney vs this hit) but I didn’t even think the crack back was even a penalty, he barely ran into him. The rule is to avoid completely blowing up guys for no reason and this clearly was not that. Weird what the NFL wants to make a priority……

  11. NFL = NATIONAL FRAUD LEAGUE. Whenever Skip Bayless sides with Wentz and the Eagles on the Clowney hit…you know you’ve crossed the line!

  12. NFL is adopting the New England philosophy:

    When you got a bogus situation, instead of fixing it, just double down on it.

  13. Should have been the reverse. Clowney fined, Ford no fine. Penalty on Ford was absurd as was the no penalty on Clowney. No consistency among the officiating crews.

  14. atlantablewa28-3lead says:
    January 11, 2020 at 11:19 am
    Bills aren’t one of the league’s pet teams so of course they’re gonna get the bad call…

    ——————————–

    This is absolutely true. But now that the Bills have become a competitive team all on their own, perhaps the league should be doing all they can to help reward the Bills fan base for their unwavering support. Not saying that they should bend the rules in their favor, but when there’s a chance to make things equitable, the league should be willing to do so.
    Fans are far too much aware of things the league does to “help” the marquee teams.

  15. Calling and then fining a ticky-tack hit like Ford’s, but not fining Clowney makes abundantly obvious that the NFL has lost the forest for the trees…is so far up in the language around these rules, and so invested in appearing to be consistent, that they have abandoned common sense.

  16. How about the refs giving the ball back to Houston after the Bills recovered the ball in the endzone when the Texans’ kick returner didn’t call for a fair catch or kneel the ball. They said that he was giving himself up. That’s like saying Desean Jackson didn’t mean to drop the ball at the 1 yard line and they should have given him the touchdown anyway. Makes no sense.

  17. The officiating in the NFL has become a complete joke. It’s almost on par with the NBA officiating which has rigged numerous games.

  18. That call on Ford was ridiculous. Then the NF6 fines him his whole game check for that same ridiculous penalty? Wow. The least they could have done is apologized to Ford, the Bills and Bills fans. That fine is a real joke. The block didn’t even knock the guy off balance. I don’t recall any fines for blind side blocks this season.

  19. Perfect examples of you can’t tell what’s a penalty anymore. Back in the day Clowney’s hit would have been called as spearing regardless of QB or runner or any other player. Not this year – at least according to the rookie referee. The call in the bills game was a joke. I’m sure he wouldn’t have been graded very high by PFF for that effort but … you just can’t figure the zebras out anymore. Job well done Mr Riveron. You have taken officiating to an entirely new level … of ineptness!

  20. How can it be considered a blindsided when they are clearly facing each other? Why is it so difficult to reach a level of common sense in the officiating of these Critical Season Deciding games??

  21. nopants39 says:

    Stop whining about Clowney. It was a clean hit, period. Stop watching slow-mo. In real time, it is a clean football play.
    =============================================

    Correct. In slow motion any hit can look like attempted murder. I never liked Clowney but it was a clean hit, even in this soft era.

  22. WTF NFL?!
    Ford gets fined for making a football block not to mention a 15 yard penalty that ultimately decided the game and Clowney gets nothing for driving a QBs head into the ground. The NFL has officially turned into a JOKE!

  23. Guy gets a fine, that’s more than he made for playing the game and risking his own health and livelihood. These playoff games have very little value for the actual players.

    Think about it like this. A player has a 3 year 30 million(only 20 guaranteed) contract in which he’s finishing the second year of it and heading into an extra playoff game that is outside the normal 17 week pay structure of regulat season. His play has been almost pro bowl level, and is top 10 at his position in the league. His 17 weekly pay checks are around 588,000$ per check. His team makes playoffs as a wildcard team and for the first wildcard game the payout per player is 28,000$. In this game, said player blows tears a pec muscle. The recovery for this is to be 6-8 months. His team de ides its best to cut him since they don’t think he will be worth the last non guaranteed 10 million and said player has to go on the market before the following season with a lengthy rehab ahead of him. So to sum it up, the player risked his following year 10 million salary to play in a playoff game for 28,000 bucks. The league is a cold business, one in which the fans hardly ever side with the laborers.

  24. FinFan68 says:
    January 11, 2020 at 1:08 pm
    Blind side block? Look at the picture. They are full on facing and engaging each other. That call likely altered the game. Shameful.

    —–

    That’s not a picture of the block. Ford got called for blocking no. 54, Jacob Martin. The article linked about Pereira has the play. You’re still basically right: he’s not blocking Martin from the side. And Martin had no shot at catching Allen.

  25. Talk about pouring salt on a wound. From my perspective, the league should apologize to Ford, and fine themselves.

  26. That call on Ford would’ve been preposterous in the first quarter of a week 3 non-divisional matchup. But to call that on a 3rd down play which put the offense in fg range in overtime of a playoff game makes me very angry. Sure, it was a 54 yarder which I’ll admit is no gimme. Still I think there was at least a 50% chance hauschka sends us to KC had this flag never been thrown

    MADON!

  27. Bogus call meanwhile the league continues to defend their blind eye to any dangerous hit or illegal play given out by the microSOFT Seahawks players.

  28. jackedupboonie says:
    January 11, 2020 at 2:17 pm

    So to sum it up, the player risked his following year 10 million salary to play in a playoff game for 28,000 bucks. The league is a cold business, one in which the fans hardly ever side with the laborers.
    +++++++++++++
    Or the laborer, say Joe Flacco for example, risks his future, has a post-season for the ages, arguably the best ever by a QB, and signs a contract that makes him the highest paid QB (at the time). He wins one playoff game after that season, is finally traded, and spends most of this season on IR. And we are supposed to feel bad for said laborer? I will not shed any tears for Mr. Flacco, nor any other laborer who signs a big contract and turns out to be a dud.

  29. Enough! I am boycotting this league. I love this game but those stuffed shirts in New York are ruining it. We don’t know what a catch is. We don’t know what interference is. Now we don’t know what a block is. No football for me until Monday. College hires qualified officials and has a eye in the sky so they get calls right. The NFL doesn’t want to get it right so they turned it into an arcade game. Get two right and you win one more chance! Ridiculous.

  30. What about the real blink side block at the goal line in the same game that allowed the Houston QB to score the touchdown…oh right no penalty was called.nfl needs a sky judge.

  31. They just can’t stop making folks of themselves, which makes fans dunces. Why watch anymore? Who ok’ed the fine? Does anyone ever get fired for doing a bad job?

  32. thefiesty1 says:
    January 11, 2020 at 1:46 pm
    That penalty didn’t cost them a win! Remember the four consecutive SB losses? Karma!

    —————-

    It sort of did. The penalty knocked the Bills out of field goal range in overtime when a field goal would have won the game. Blowing a 16 – 0 lead did not help. Karma?

  33. Clowney deserved a fine because it’s PC to say so.

    Ford deserved the fine because his name is symbolic with the automobile, the biggest threat to our planet and all life on it.

  34. Why don’t we start fining refs for terrible calls? There is no accountability for terrible calls that determine change the outcomes of games. Maybe the refs got money on the game????

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