Report: Commissioner would retain final say over Personal Conduct Policy appeals under new CBA

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The new CBA, if accepted by the NFL Players Association, would alter the Commissioner’s power when it comes to player discipline. From the proposal summarized by the NFLPA, the details are vague. A new report puts some meat on the bone.

“Implementation of a neutral decision-maker for most Commissioner Discipline cases” is the explanation contained in the summary. Via Mark Maske of the Washington Post, the Commissioner would continue to have authority over the appeals of discipline imposed under the Personal Conduct Policy. It’s the initial decision that would be made by a neutral party, not by the Commissioner or the Commissioner’s designee.

Even though the Commissioner would retain final say over the process, the initial decision-maker would have tremendous influence over the process, especially if the appeal standard gives deference to the ruling made by the initial decision-maker — and if the Commissioner has no ability to impose a punishment more stringent than the decision made by the neutral party.

Thus, although the Commissioner currently is jury, jury, executioner, and appeals court, the new CBA would make him only the appeals court. (And the executioner.) But the judge and the jury would be a neutral party, and that neutral party would be in much better position to pose tough questions to league investigators and to ensure a degree of fairness to the players that the current process often lacks.

12 responses to “Report: Commissioner would retain final say over Personal Conduct Policy appeals under new CBA

  1. So the Personal Conduct Policy that the Commissioner started without any say so from the NFLPA will not only continue to exist but be even stronger now? Come on now, SOMEONE has to have the spine to fight him on that.

  2. Its tough to see the players make so much money for only 16 games a year and within those 16 games, only 12 minutes of actual action combined offense and defense. Basically they only play 3.5 hours over the course of a regular season. And they still cry.

  3. Its tough to see the players make so much money for only 16 games a year and within those 16 games, only 12 minutes of actual action combined offense and defense. Basically they only play 3.5 hours over the course of a regular season. And they still cry.
    —————————————————————————————–
    Yes because no other work is done by the players except actual game play.

    You can call it crying. I call it getting their fair share of the profits. I pay to see the players, not the owners.

  4. I understand that this is a buisness and a job for the players. I understand that as a player they want to maximize their earnings, I get that. However this article highlights two issues for me and I am sure many fans. One is how politics has taken over the game. Second is how much money these guys make. At some point it has to stop, fans will no longer be able to justify the price tag to attend the games consistently. I know the argument is always that the owners make big money so why shouldn’t the players right? When you put it into perspective I wouldnt think any other job in America is looked at in that way. For example, I work for a large oil refinery, I can guarantee no one has considered my salary based on what they make.

  5. I think people dont understand that article or didnt read it. Basically someone other then the commissioner hands out the discipline and if the player appeals then the commissioner has final say over if it gets reduced or not.

    I fail to see why as a player you wouldn’t want this.

  6. JJ412 says:

    You can call it crying. I call it getting their fair share of the profits. I pay to see the players, not the owners.
    ————————
    I agree. However, just trying to put it in pespective. 3.5 hours of live action in an entire season. Its not much of a product for the customer when you look at the big picture.

  7. HagemeisterPark says:
    February 21, 2020 at 11:18 am
    Its tough to see the players make so much money for only 16 games a year and within those 16 games, only 12 minutes of actual action combined offense and defense. Basically they only play 3.5 hours over the course of a regular season. And they still cry.
    —-
    They work 60+ hours a week, including voluntary and involuntary team activities year around (some include medical recovery) and you want to monkey that down to 3.5 hours a season? Absurd. Are you going to hold yourself to the same standards with your own job in the workforce?

    In the great words of Junior Seau when asked why he works so hard in practice….
    “I get paid to practice. I play the games for free.”

  8. That’s hilarious. So Rodger wants more time to golf. Just the ability to show up in time to review and adjust however he deems appropriate.

  9. Needs to be some kinda conduct committee and not the commish as judge jury and executioner. way way to much power for one person. no real suggestion on who would make up such a committee and would be hard to think of situation where bias wouldn’t play a role.

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