Aaron Rodgers explains his opposition to proposed CBA

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Aaron Rodgers has spoken.

Like other high-profile players who are against the proposed CBA, the Packers’ franchise quarterback has shared his opposition to the deal. Unlike those other players, Rodgers’ position has extra credibility because he’s involved in union leadership, as the Green Bay player representative.

Rodgers has taken to Twitter to explain his position. Here’s what he wrote.

I voted no last night,” Rodgers said. “My decision to vote no is based off of the conversations I have had with the men in my locker room I’m tasked to represent. This deal will affect every player that ever plays this game and we have made this decision with only an abbreviated version of the deal and this isn’t good enough. Although I do see that there are many things in the proposal that improve the lives and care for past, present, and future NFL players, there are issues with others.

“16 games to me, was never something to be negotiated. The owners made it clear that the 17th game is about paying for the ‘added’ benefits, and had nothing to do with positive feedback received about any extra risks involved with the added regular season game (also an extra game for every 2 seed moving forward on Wild Card weekend, i.e. [Packers] 2019 = no bye).

“There were also many issues raised about the workplace, the workload and the offseason program. Some have been addressed, while others have not. With an extra game added to the schedule, added risk, and longer stretches before and after the bye week, we felt it was important to address adding more offseason recovery time. The ideas discussed would not add cost for teams, in fact if anything, would lessen some of them.

“My involvement has been far less than the negotiating team, the EC and the owners in these conversations, and I’m sensitive to that and appreciate the time and sacrifices made. My involvement as a player rep, and a 15 year player in this great game though, allows me this platform to share my opinion, and at the same time, requires me to speak on behalf of the sentiment I hear from my teammates. 

“The value of our players and the strength of the NFLPA can only be realized, if we ourselves know and believe in our worth. I respect the democratic nature of this process and have been, and will continue to talk with my teammates on the Packers, and my colleagues across the league.”

Rodgers’ primary concern seems to come from the lack of information provided to the board of player representatives regarding the details of the deal. But he’s also trying to reduce the offseason program dramatically; per one source aware of the dynamics of the discussions, Rodgers would like the league to wipe out the offseason program entirely.

Of course, for established players like Rodgers, there’s an easy alternative to the league scrapping the offseason program. It’s voluntary, so he doesn’t have to show up for anything other than the annual three-day mandatory minicamp.

(He easily could skip that, too. The fines for missing the event represent pressed peanut sweepings in comparison to what he earns.)

Regardless, Rodgers has shared his views. And because he’s directly involved in the union process, his views merit more consideration than those from stars who choose to drop a drive-by deuce onto a deal that they spent none of their personal time working to understand and negotiate.

68 responses to “Aaron Rodgers explains his opposition to proposed CBA

  1. Any deal that any billionaire is satisfied with is bad for the other party. When 32 billionaires are satisfied with a deal its really bad for the other parties.

  2. Oh no, this means no new CBA can be completed. Because we all know that what Erin wants, Erin gets. Who else in the history of the sport has had league rules rewritten for him because he can’t take a hit? Yep, exactly.

  3. Reduce the offseason program? The barley have one now and it shows the first 5 weeks of the season. They need to devote a month straight just to work on tackling. IN PADS!!
    If these whiny players reject this it’s not going to sit well with the fans and remember, without fans there is no NFL and no Million dollar contracts. I know, who cares about the fans.

  4. I hope the players don’t scrape the proposed new CBA based on Rodgers’ assessment. The added game in exchange for all the new concessions is reasonable, even by him. His objections to length of off season does not hold water. It’s optional! In fact, some get paid for attending.

  5. Seems odd that only the highly compensated players are speaking against deal. Is it because they will make less on 17th game and the “minimum” wages players will make more? Lets here from the the ST players and the average guys that only last 3-4 years, instead of A.Rodgers and R.Wilson.

  6. Where else but football,can you demand to make as much as the owner? This is ridiculous agree to the owners deal!

  7. Seems odd that only the highly compensated players are speaking against deal. Is it because they will make less on 17th game and the “minimum” wages players will make more overall? Lets here from the the ST players and the average guys that only last 3-4 years, instead of A.Rodgers and R.Wilson.

  8. Very well thought out response. I like that he acknowledges he was not at the table but respects the time and effort given doing so. Those people negotiating have a thankless job.

  9. Does Rodgers share a % of his revenue he makes from endorsements with other players and the league? Maybe that should be in the contract.

  10. He’s not used to playing too deep into January like that.
    ——
    You do realize that outside of the Patriots no team has been to the post season as often (8 years in a row at one point) as the Packers under AR right? Think before you type people.

  11. The lack of transparency in regards to the details of the offer is the single BEST reason why every player should vote no. None of us…no one anywhere, should make a life altering decision with less than 100% of the information regarding that decision.

    I don’t care if you’re pro union or not, you have to have all the information in order to make an informed decision. Otherwise you’re just sniffing what is blowing by in the wind. And if it smells like fish it likely is fishy.

  12. Cannot believe any player would consider voting for the proposed CBA without a full disclosure of all terms.

  13. All the guys speaking against it have already raked in their large contract. Let’s interview those guys who are at the lower tier of pay. Those are the guys I want to hear from.

  14. The Super Bowl teams will wind up playing 20 games that count – that’s too much.
    I like my NFL, but I’d much rather see the players respond like Pouncey, a massive united NO!!!
    The owners just don’t care about the players in any way shape or form; and the players make the game what it is, not a bunch of suits. Pretty soon most teams will be a few expensive players – QB, ends, pass rusher, etc., and a bunch of 1-3 year players making minimum. A VERY few will even be considered for a second contract, it’s just use’em, flush’em, repeat.
    You think the quality is going downhill now, just give it a few years under that new agreement.

  15. How did the EC and player reps vote on the CBA when they haven’t seen the entire proposal? The whole rollout seems haphazard…

  16. Of course veterans want less off-season camps. Because that’s where the younger players LEARN TO GET BETTER. These vets are afraid of losing their jobs to these new guys, and if they can limit the learning and improving opportunities, the harder it is to replace them.

    Yet they’re forgetting they were once that “young guy” that come in and replaced older vets too.

  17. Well, Aaron…well spoken. Clear, concise, addressing the main contentious issue.
    And based on the discussions you have had with the other members of your team, I would expect a ‘no’ from the majority of the Packers rank and file.

    Well, in truth I expect 13 no votes. Mason Crosby at a $4 million cap charge, and the 12 earning more than him. I see $4 million as the line – that $250,000 a game break point.

  18. You know who never had to worry about offseason programs? Vince Lomnardi. Halas. George Allen. Their players never had problems tackling. The offseason program is a joke, and veteran playera are insane to participate.

    The problem with tackling stems from the players refusing to have full-contact practices, and refusing to play in exhibition games.

  19. I am not so sure AR is the best player representative. He shamelessly sucks up as much of Green Bay’s cap as he can. That is not really a problem for me at all, but does come at the cost of reduced salaries for his teammates. So that leads me to wonder if he will really represent other people on his team well. Clearly, for salary, he puts his own interests at the top of the list.

  20. Thank you. No 17th game. Ever. It’s too much. Already have too many backups playing week 14 and on.

  21. NFL has become a mess. Overpaid guys and still not happy. Let them have a lockout, that will loose fan fare as another league is just picking up steam. Vince is praying for an NFL strike to be certain.

  22. The comments by so many here have me wondering; does the average reader of pft really want a strike/lockout to occur just because the owners are rich? By most standards; so are the players.

    If there is a 17th game we as fans aren’t hurting much.

  23. harrisonhits2 says:
    February 26, 2020 at 7:07 pm

    Any deal that any billionaire is satisfied with is bad for the other party. When 32 billionaires are satisfied with a deal its really bad for the other parties.
    __________________________________

    Show me any other billionaire owned company that starts their people out at $500K/yr minimum, just one?

  24. Aaron and several other QBs and teams looked pretty bad until week 4 and he thinks that less pre-season games and practices are in order?

    And what about the lost art in the NFL = TACKLING!
    Everyone seem to concerned with stripping the ball to the point they don’t tackle and it doesn’t matter if the ball-carrier gets an extra 10-15-20yd or even a TD those players will come out the next series and do the exact same thing again, this game is getting really hard to watch with all of the sloppiness!

  25. The smarter they try to talk, the dumber they appear. This could be my last year as a season ticket holder. I can always go find a high school game on a friday nite and just root for players that love the game. Those are the bottom 99.9 percent that will never turn pro. I wish those of us that work for a living could reap the benefits (and yes, i will take the risk knowingly) of those that ‘entertain’ us.

  26. 80/20 rule. 80% of the money goes to 20% of the players. It’s an opportunity for the other 80% of the players increase Their income and benefits. Rogers doesn’t have to worry about earning a single dime for the rest of his life.

  27. I sure hope he leads the players to a very long strike. Time to wash the NFL of the currently greedy players by using replacements.

  28. Unless everything is nailed down, the Owners will take the players to the cleaners. These are guys who are used to shafting employees, so the NFLPA needs to be very, very careful.

  29. The 17th game ruins record books. Makes comparing modern day feats with historical feats much more difficult. In no way is it better for the game. Greed. That’s all the 17th game and extra playoff games represent. Greed. Plain and simple. I can give it up. Free up my Sundays for golf.

  30. This is all part of the natural dance of negotiations. Side A intentionally loads up on things that are wholly advantageous to them while packaging it with a thin message on the ‘benefits’, knowing full well it’ll get rejected. Side B gets to reject it, and make a spectacle of it of some importance. Side A, in agreement on what points they really care about, will ‘come back to the table’ and slowly whittle away the things that they don’t. Oftentimes, outlandish requests are dropped, so they appear ‘reasonable’ and ‘hat in hand’. Through all of this, both sides, when outright confused or their strategy isn’t working, will threaten to ‘drop talks’ and ‘stall dialogue’ to buy time.

    This is a tale as old as time. Life is water, not stone.

  31. I understand the points Rodgers is making. Particularly that of the recovery time. I have always held that the number of games played is’nt the issue, it’s the rest, recovery time.

    Of course, an unlimited amount of games is foolish. But i think 19 is perfect.

    My proposition: I reserve the full rights to my idea and require compensation if it ever is adopted in any way shape or form.

    My 19 Game proposal:
    Season begins as usual, first Thursday after memorial day.
    Starting week 6 four teams on bye till week 9.
    All teams Play week 10. By this time you had 4 weeks of byes….16 teams.
    After week 10 No teams play till 2 Thursdays later…this year week 10 would end with monday night Football november 16th.

    What comes 2 Thursdays later? Thanksgiving! HERE IS THE COUP THE GRACE… This is the odd game….
    Make it the exhibition. In many ways….Players all get 10 days off. After playing that Monday night game, All players are off till Saturday On that Thursday, having played 10 games, 9 for bye teams, Schedule teams who were not scheduled to play each other that year for the Thanksgiving matchup. Thus unbeaten teams play the other unbeaten teams until you get down to the non-win or 1-win teams….you can do so by Conference, fan vote etc.

    Think of the buzz this would generate…Schedule these games at he sites the NFL wants to grow the game….London, Mexico, Toronto, Brazil; cities in the US: Alabama, Nebraska, etc.

    Play a full slate on thursday, with a 1pm featyred game, 3pm featured and night standalone.

    Then a Saturday night standalone, Sunday standalone and Monday Standalone….So you have a week and a half off before Thanksgiving but fans stay engaged in the prospect of the matchup reveal, then lots of talk for a week till Thanksgiving. These standalone games can be bid on by the Networks Because you now have 4 standalones.Plus a 1pm featured and 3pm featured.
    For the majority of teams who play on thanksgiving they have another mini-bye before they play again.

    10 days off before Thanksgiving…10 days off after! with at least 4 o those 10 on each side being mandatory home time.

    Then after the Thanksgiving Superweek, all teams play again, regular schedule, that will be gameweek 12.
    Starting GW 13, you have another 4 weeks of byes.

    By the time the Playoffs start, no team will have had more than 7 weeks without at least 8 days off.

    At this point you can have your current proposal of 2 byes in the Playoffs only.

    I would also mandate every Monday off! Players do not report until 2 days after their weekly game. Also they do not begin practicing until 3 days after their last game.
    So that means every Monday of every week.

    Scrap the ProBowl.

    Also all Players get a full 5 months off after the Season….No ota’s etc….thn stagger the Playoff teams….Non playoff teams begin to report exactly 21 weeks after their last game.

    Wild card losers report 23 weeks later then one additional week for each Playoff level…Divisional losers then Conference the Superbowl participants.

    1 preseason game. This is the ame that coincides with the HOF weekend. inter-squad scrimmages before and after. 4 weeks of padded practices to end at least 2 weeks before the first Game of the Season with Players getting at least 10 days off before practice starts on Wednesday before opening Sunday. 5 days earlier for opening day Thursday.

    By my calculations that gives players about 40 days off in a 4 1/2 month span.

  32. More players need to voice their specific concerns when talking about this. The owners had their talking points ready to go and fed them to the media regarding specific increases in total revenue share, minimum pay etc… Just saying “hard no” or Pouncey’s rant carries no weight. Tell people what problems you have with it. The NFLPA is terrible at public relations as well.

  33. The owners are very generous people. Many donate millions of dollars to charities every year. The NFL players make tons of money. Most of them make enough money in two years to set themselves up financially for life. Most NFL fans work hard every day, and many struggle to make ends meet. Aaron Rodgers already won a super bowl, and is set up well for life. He really couldn’t care less if he ever gets back to the super bowl, so practice isn’t a big priority for him. He’s content with what he’s already accomplished, and isn’t hungry for more. I’d hate to think he’s the leader of the Pack. The players who end up permanently losing their jobs to replacement players are often the ones who can least afford to do so. Aaron might not care all that much about his teammates. I’ll bet Patrick Mahomes can’t wait to get back on the practice field.

  34. cut two preseason games. Play 17 games. Hell they already hardly hit in practice. They have one of the best jobs you can have get paid to play a kids game. Far as I can tell they’re not being forced to play the game. Yes they can get hurt, that’s the chance they take. Hell there was one player that said he would give up some year of his life to play in the NFL. These players can be financially secure if the take care of their money. That includes the base salary players also. one more thing I’ve been NFL practice High school practice harder than the pros. And they play for the love of the game. NFL is getting soft. They want more for less.

  35. Like him or hate him, agree or disagree with his viewpoint, I respect the fact that he presented a thoughtful, nuanced rationale.

    What is most compelling to me is that the players are being asked to ratify the agreement without at least receiving a copy of what they are being asked to ratify. If they choose not to plow through it, then that’s on them, and if they do read it and can’t understand parts of it, they should ask their reps for clarifications. This agreement has LOTS of parts to it and is for TEN years in length. As an aside, a good negotiation leaves all parties at least a bit dissatisfied. No one gets everything they want. Each player will have to figure out what they can live with and what they can’t, but the bottom line is that they should not be buffaloed into voting ‘yes’ without at least a full presentation of the entire agreement.

  36. donnymacjack says:
    February 26, 2020 at 7:51 pm
    The lack of transparency in regards to the details of the offer is the single BEST reason why every player should vote no. None of us…no one anywhere, should make a life altering decision with less than 100% of the information regarding that decision.

    I don’t care if you’re pro union or not, you have to have all the information in order to make an informed decision. Otherwise you’re just sniffing what is blowing by in the wind. And if it smells like fish it likely is fishy.

    —————————

    What are you talking about? The NFLPA is sending the complete CBA details to every player as well as holding conference calls to discuss it and having open forums for any questions.

    The fact that a few highly paid players are speaking out before the NFLPA has a chance to give them the details is not a reason to reject it.

  37. But he’s also trying to reduce the offseason program dramatically; per one source aware of the dynamics of the discussions, Rodgers would like the league to wipe out the offseason program entirely.

    ======================

    There is the Aaron’s real crusade. The last CBA watered down the preseason so much that the first month of the NFL looks like preseason. Now he actually wants to hold the preseason during the season.

    Very self-serving and very bad for the sport. This would make it impossible for any young player to unseat a veteran and can you imagine players playing together for the 1st time in 8 months in week 1 of the regular season?

  38. I like Aaron Rodgers take on this whole CBA thing. He makes good sense. I remember much talk about the next bargaining agreement and the talk centered how the league could reduce Goodell’s to punish players at his own discrimination and that it has not always been fair as I see it. Many posters on this didn’t believe the league would have enough players stand their ground, to try and lobby for some concessions from the Commissioner’s dictatorial overbearing power. No like many of us I don’t want a strike but I would rather they try and get some say, before they sign, in how they are treated personally with infractions and fines. The best time to go on strike would be with another league in action at this time. Don’t any of you want to see Goodell’s overbearing power somewhat restrained? The players are tough as hell on the field, now they have to bring some of that toughness, to the bargaining table or end up, once again, with little say and how they are treated by the front office again and into the future for several more years! Strike while the fire is hot and there is competition from new leagues, now and in the future.

  39. I am not a big Rogers fan but I agree with him on this.
    I will watch football if it is played and if there is a lockout I won’t no big deal to me.

  40. Where have I seen this before….” We have to pass it before we read it and know whats in it”
    Rogers is right….gotta see the details and small print

  41. lonespeed says: “The 17th game ruins record books. Makes comparing modern day feats with historical feats much more difficult. In no way is it better for the game. Greed. That’s all the 17th game and extra playoff games represent. Greed. Plain and simple. I can give it up. Free up my Sundays for golf.”
    ———————-

    Most people watch football because they like the GAME, not some silly stat record…

    Seriously, as if you can name all record holders from the first 75 years of football when they only played 10, 12 and 14 game schedules.

  42. The biggest thing that jumps out to me is; he wants the off season program scrapped, but he says 1 more game is bad for players health. These two things do not coincide very well. Not having an off season program would lead to more injuries, I would think. And, which players in the locker room has he actually talked to? Certainly not the bottom of the roster, because those guys are not even there right now. Those that are strictly special teams and bottom of the roster guys, and practice squad guys, would be getting huge raises in this contract.

  43. lack of information seems to be the problem. I wish the media would talk to those who favor it and get their reasons..

  44. Steve Cunningham says:
    February 26, 2020 at 9:26 pm
    harrisonhits2 says:
    February 26, 2020 at 7:07 pm
    Any deal that any billionaire is satisfied with is bad for the other party. When 32 billionaires are satisfied with a deal its really bad for the other parties.
    __________________________________
    Show me any other billionaire owned company that starts their people out at $500K/yr minimum, just one?
    ————————
    MLB, NBA, & NHL…..There’s 3.

  45. Aaron HAS NEVER SAID he wants the offseason program wiped out entirely. Aaron never has missed one day of the offseason program in his entire career. The offseason program is voluntary and thus you can’t rid of something that is not required.

    It is a positive that Aaron is listening to his teammates thoughts and not just basing his opinions off his personal feelings of the CBA. That is what each teams player rep is supposed to do.

  46. fallinsaint says:
    February 26, 2020 at 7:17 pm

    Seems odd that only the highly compensated players are speaking against deal. Is it because they will make less on 17th game and the “minimum” wages players will make more? Lets here from the the ST players and the average guys that only last 3-4 years, instead of A.Rodgers and R.Wilson.

    Yes exactly, this is why I watch the NFL to see the ST players and the average guys that last only 3-4 years….wait a minute I’ll just start watching the XFL

  47. (also an extra game for every 2 seed moving forward on Wild Card weekend, i.e. [Packers] 2019 = no bye).

    and yet again Aaron makes it all about himself. SMH

  48. Aaron won’t be happy until he can spend the entire offseaSon in Cali and away from Green Bay. Being forced to spend even 1 day in camp in Green Bay during the offseaSon is too much for Aaron

  49. If Rogers really cared about players, he would fight for guaranteed contracts like any other league. It is pathetic that the NFL which has the highest injury rate, and shortest average careers of any major sport does not have guaranteed contracts. That is something to strike over, and should have been done years ago.

  50. Yet, they are still willing to jobber the rookies, who are not even in the league with a vote yet. Hypocrites.

  51. Cry baby crap… With the new CBA minimum rookie salaray will be $1,000,000 puting them in the top 1% of wage eraners in the US. Every strarter in the top .1 % of wage earners . . . Hey if Bernie wins there won’t be any billionaires nor millionaires

  52. Rodgers never mentions his actual hand size, but they were measured at 10⅛ inches at the 2005 NFL combine before he was drafted. Anything over 9½ inches is considered above average for a quarterback.

  53. Rodgers’ comments are almost always well thought out, and these tweets are no exception. He’s probably one of the few NFL players that has taken the time to read (and understand) all of the proposed terms.

  54. stellarperformance says:
    February 27, 2020 at 3:58 pm
    Rodgers never mentions his actual hand size, but they were measured at 10⅛ inches at the 2005 NFL combine before he was drafted. Anything over 9½ inches is considered above average for a quarterback

    @@@@@@@@@@222
    That’s some kinda hang up you have over Aaron’s 10 1/8 inches.

  55. Cousins’ hands are only slightly larger than Bridgewaters’ 9-1/4” hands. ’

    I think we’re seeing a trend.

  56. The owners have supposedly been negotiating with “player representatives” for quite a while now. If the players are being asked to vote on the CBA without being given all the details then their reps aren’t representing them very well, or the owners are trying to force things through that aren’t as player-friendly as they’re saying.

    The NFL is a cash cow that is trying to vastly expand its annual revenue (Goodell announced $25 billion by 2025 a few years ago) and international presence – which is really the only way to “find” so much more money.

    The players should be careful and make sure the deal is good for them, but in reality the owners have more leverage than the players. Even if the owners lock the players out, the owners will put big money into a PR campaign to demonize the players (which is exactly what happened last time).

    Lastly, no one should complain about player salaries. The earn so much because the NFL brings in so much money. If you were a player you’d try to get as much as possible, too.

  57. more time off means more time to spend laying around with Danica….

    on a serious note… this is very respectable.. although, he doesn’t menation the 48% + share of the owners…

    we will see….

    I don’t think much will change myself.

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