Mike Pouncey say veteran players are organizing a separate strike fund

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For the past few years, the NFL Players Association has been squirreling away cash in the event of a work stoppage in 2021. Chargers center Mike Pouncey claims that he and other veterans will be creating a separate strike fund to help players get through a season without football.

“We are in the process of drawing up another fund to help in the wake of this 2021 strike,” Pouncey said on Instagram. “I myself @mikepouncey and @russellokung are all putting up 250k apiece along with a lot of other vet players stay tuned!!”

This follows a recent video from Mike Pouncey, whose choice of language was far from i-dentical to his identical twice Maurkice. In Mike’s video, he provided that all players will be taken care of during a 2021 strike.

In order for a work stoppage to work, it will be critical for the players to have enough cash for the duration of it. But collecting, handling, and dispersing that cash quickly will become a full-time job for one or more people. Plus, there will be many questions to resolve. Does every player get the same total amount? Or do players get it based on what they currently earn, with a percentage replaced? Does federal/state law require taxes to be paid and withheld? Will some players who have made dramatically more than most  be expected to take nothing? If so, what will be the cutoff?

Whatever the amount of the fund, a work stoppage will still require all players to pass on 100 percent of their salary plus 100 percent of their ability to play football. The far more effective approach, as we’ve discussed in the past, would be for the players to set up their own alternative league to compete with the NFL during a strike, since the NFL surely would hire replacement players, like it did in 1987.

Of course, that would require a small army of people working full time to organize a player-owned-and-operated league that would have more value in its threat than in its execution. The owners already have everything in place to proceed with games because they play games. The players would be building their own thing from scratch.

Even though watching real NFL players would be far more compelling than watching XFL players in NFL uniforms (or, as I’m currently experiencing, XFL players in XFL uniforms), it would be a very difficult task. And it would be far more difficult than raising a strike fund large enough to get players to take the leap of faith that their bills will be paid for a full football season, if they refuse the current deal and take their chances in 2021.

58 responses to “Mike Pouncey say veteran players are organizing a separate strike fund

  1. Granted not all NFL players make millions per year but those that do and even with league minimum if you can’t go a year with no NFL check I really have no sympathy for you. Guess you wasted your time in college skipping class and still handed passing grades

  2. LOL these players want as much money as leagues where they play 82 or 162 games and have roster sizes of 15 or 24. Also where the playoffs have best of 7 series.

    Every NBA season is like literally half a decade of NFL product, actually more like 6 years if you include the playoffs. Meanwhile the NBA doesn’t have 53 man rosters to pay.

    The average NFL player only plays about an hour or so of actual game time a season if they play a full 16 game season (not counting playoffs or preseason).

    These players are delusional. They already make more per game than any other league. Nothing wrong with that. But wanting even more is going to backfire.

    People don’t care about guys whose minimum salary is about 15-30 years of a normal person.

  3. Go on strike and that will be the straw that broke the camels back. I’ll spend my time and money elsewhere.

  4. absolutely

    i had it all along

    the players have the leverage here for a few reasons but mainly due to the 17 game crap and the dropping ratings. The leverage is that..over-saturation

    call them on it

  5. The prospects of the players forming their own league with a much larger chunk of the pie has to scare the pants off the owners. They better get organized and lay the foundation now to be ready to roll in 2021. They DO have the product the consumers want to pay to see.

  6. These players need a reality check! The owners caved on almost everything to get a 17th game and get it done fast.

  7. jmc8888 says:
    March 1, 2020 at 4:42 pm

    People don’t care about guys whose minimum salary is about 15-30 years of a normal person.
    —–
    No, but people certainly care about billionaires when it comes to missing out on entertainment.

  8. Because a lot of these guys spend every penny they make, as fast as they make it. Like most Americans, just to a higher level. Don’t feel sorry for anybody making this kind of money and being broke by missing one paycheck. Minimum wage in the NFL is like 10-12 years for the average family of four.

  9. Not many heroes left this once great game dies a little more each year what happen to all the real men? Now it’s mostly greedy cry babies and lawyers.

  10. I laugh out loud at people suggesting “take on the billionaires”. These clowns can’t even go one game check without having to borrow money or dip into a special fund, but you think they can beat the billionaires at business? Sure. Ok. Here’s the deal with billionaires. They made billions by crushing everybody in their path. And they will easily out wait the players and win, again.

  11. The owners know that most of the guys in the league are the supporters of a large extended family, and will be forced to cave. I’m sure the percentage of players in a Tyron Smith-like situation is pretty substantial and hamstrings the union to a degree.

  12. conormacleod says:
    March 1, 2020 at 4:56 pm

    Here’s the deal with billionaires. They made billions by crushing everybody in their path.
    ———
    Pure delusion. NFL team owners became billionaires by inheriting their money or exploiting political connections, or both. The self-made billionaires are a small minority of NFL owners.

  13. I try to stay impartial on matters like this but it’s hard when players cry about the amount of money they should be making.

    My heart goes out to the veteran non starter, special team guys who do the dirty work just trying to stay in the league they should be getting the lay bumps. It seems like when the cap goes up, mostly the high profile players like qb’s siphon off more than they should leaving the fringe players with peanuts.

    In regards to the cba, I’m not really sure what players expectations or demands are. If they think they are going to be able to hold out until all of them are payed like lebron that is never going to happen due to the amount of games and amount of players that need to be paid. But I do agree that fringe players should make more money and enough of this prorated contract we don’t have to guarantee you the league minimum if we cut you and bring you back after week one. That is just a crappy loophole that needs to be closed.

    The big name players (Top 200)imo make Way too much over the rest of the league and that gap needs to close. I also think a mandatory retirement portfolio should he setup for players as they have shown a propensity to live beyond their means and should have someone to try to save themselves from the 22 year old versions of themselves.

  14. In 1970 the average player made between $20k to $60k a year. They had second jobs and played for the love of the game. They played their asses off and took and delivered hits that’d make the cry babies playing today call for their mamas.

    Now we’ve got running backs who won’t get off the couch for $14 million, guys who won’t stop smoking pot no matter how much is on the line, and players bitching about franchise tags that pay them $10’s of millions. It’s getting tough to be an NFL fan.

    Coincidentally the xfl is putting on a good game on fs1 right now….going to watch it. Gotta respect guys breaking their backs for the same or less salary than most of us have.

  15. Kepp down voting. I count 18 owners or ownership groups that only own a team thanks to inheritance of a fortune or of the team itself. Buy hey, GO BILLIONAIRES!

  16. Not gonna happen. If they think a strike is their leverage then they’re dreaming…

  17. Ah yes the same Pouncey who called for the freedom of Aaron Hernandez. A true voice of reason here gentlemen!

  18. Many of the striking players will never get their jobs back. So many are borderline guys anyway, and there will be lots of players hungry for that money. Once that starts happening, many of the veterans will come back begging for their old jobs. I guarantee you the players will be hurt so bad by a strike, they won’t even think about another one for 40 years. The American public, many who are living paycheck to paycheck, just doesn’t have any sympathy for a group of very rich young men who decided they’d take away our Sunday NFL escape from reality. We’re all for the players, but the minute they quit on us, we become best friends with the owners, and will support whatever measures they choose to teach these spoiled rich kids a tough lesson. I don’t know who Mike Pouncey or guys like J.J. Watt are hanging around with, but they definitely don’t have their finger on the pulse of middle America. Delusional.

  19. Think about the rookies – they’re just about to realize a lifetime dream of playing in the NFL, and they walk into a strike which they had no vote on. And they have had no paychecks.

    Good to know there is a fund for them, but still a setback for those that would make the team. And some who would not make the team could end up with more money than if there were never a strike.

  20. charliecharger says:
    March 1, 2020 at 5:21 pm

    We’re all for the players, but the minute they quit on us, we become best friends with the owners, and will support whatever measures they choose to teach these spoiled rich kids a tough lesson.
    ———–
    Guess what? You’re not “all for the players”. You consider them nothing more than a commodity but don’t have the self-awareness to admit it.

  21. Most of these guys just have to sell 2 chains, a set of ear or nipple rings, and 1 car and they could limp through a full season.

  22. An average professional football game lasts 3 hours and 12 minutes, but if you tally up the time when the ball is actually in play, the action amounts to a mere 11 minutes (Wall Street Journal.)

    That’s 5.5 minutes of actual whistle-to-whistle time for each defensive player and each offensive player………and that’s only if they’re starters!

    They are already compensated fairly. Very fairly.

  23. Don’t strike this year! This is Cousins’ third year in a three-year contract. This is it. This is the time. This is the guarantee. SuperBowl baby!

  24. There is NO comparison to NBA or MLB to the NFL. On one hand the NBA & MLB have many times more games and a longer season on the other hand the NFL players do not want to play 17 games. Also the NFL rosters are larger then NBA and MLB and getting bigger under the proposed deal. Sharing revenue at 48+% basically makes the players a partner with the owners with their individual performance the final determination of team share. Not sure what the players end game is but if they do not accept the current proposal they should clearly articulate what they want. The Michael Thomas argument was laughable especially when viewed from the perspective of the average “joe” who is the fan. When the players lose the fans, the fans will gladly support replacement player games.

  25. I can’t take anything seriously from someone who wore “Free Aaron Hernandez” hats. Obviously, shows they don’t have great judgement.

  26. Feds likely view this as money laundering, interstate racketeering. It’s a good idea but they will definitely need legal advice.

  27. players lost much fan support with the kneeling a few years ago, we do not forget

  28. All right, veterans!! The union spirit- all for one, one for all! We’re in this together, brothers!!

    Lol.

  29. It’s ludicrous (and pretty funny) to even fantasize about the players starting their own league! They can’t even negotiate a new CBA (if they vote down the contract their representatives spent almost a year working on). What happens to guys that WOULD have been rookies in 2021? Too bad for you, kid? If they were serious about striking, the Uber rich guys should’ve started a fund long ago. As for their leverage, as I’ve said before, the NFL will have no problems replacing the current players. The class envy of making the owners seem like greedy jerks always amazes me. It IS their business, regardless of how they got it. Yet commentors (and commentators) act as though they should be obligated to bow to their employees. Not sure where most of the people who feel this way work, but it must be a sweet gig (or a government job). LOL

  30. jfiling says:

    Kepp down voting. I count 18 owners or ownership groups that only own a team thanks to inheritance of a fortune or of the team itself. Buy hey, GO BILLIONAIRES!
    ==========================================

    I’m sure you would refuse to inherit billions.

  31. The moment a guy signs a big contract…..his team is trying to find his replacement. This doesn’t happen in any other sport.

  32. $250k. With both of them it’s $500k. The average NFL player salary is $860k. There are 1,696 players in the NFL. The vast majority of players make less than $1M. Sure, it should be easy for the superstars to survive–and if not then they should take a good hard look at their spending habits. That $500k from Pouncey and Russell Okung amounts to $294 per player. Yeah, that’ll be enough for them to miss an entire year’s worth of paychecks.

    From what it sounds like the owners have made all the concessions and the players still aren’t happy. Go ahead, let them strike. I enjoyed the strike season football. It may not have been great football but it was entertaining. I’d rather watch that then a bunch of multi-millionaires whine about how they can’t afford to feed their family then turn around and give 25% effort on the football field.

  33. Donated $250k? It would take 3 veteran players donating that to compensate 1 special teamer for missing a year of work. Under the new CBA it is more like 4 vet players at that rate to compensate the guy at the end of the roster.

    The math just doesn’t work out. It actually shows how out of touch the top of the pay scale is to the rank and file. The rank and file got a great deal out of this new CBA

    That number is less than 3% of Pouncey’s 2019 salary.

  34. It doesn’t matter how the billionaires got their money, the point is they can handle an extended work stoppage way longer than the players can, even with some half-assed fund created at the last second.

  35. Michael E says:
    March 1, 2020 at 6:51 pm

    jfiling says:

    Kepp down voting. I count 18 owners or ownership groups that only own a team thanks to inheritance of a fortune or of the team itself. Buy hey, GO BILLIONAIRES!
    ==========================================

    I’m sure you would refuse to inherit billions.

    ————-
    If you were paying attention you would have recognized that my comment was a response to the clown that says that the NFL billionaires got that way “by crushing everybody in their path.” I guess inheriting from daddy or papa ot hubby equals “crushing everybody in their path” to some of the sycophants on this site.

  36. mfiafdb says:
    March 1, 2020 at 4:44 pm
    This would really help the XFL…

    94 8 Rate This

    —————-

    right. even more
    leverage

  37. eagleswin says:
    March 1, 2020 at 7:09 pm
    Donated $250k? It would take 3 veteran players donating that to compensate 1 special teamer for missing a year of work. Under the new CBA it is more like 4 vet players at that rate to compensate the guy at the end of the roster.

    The math just doesn’t work out. It actually shows how out of touch the top of the pay scale is to the rank and file. The rank and file got a great deal out of this new CBA

    That number is less than 3% of Pouncey’s 2019 salary.

    1 1 Rate This

    ——————

    Ahem, it doesn’t need to be a year. All of preseason and week 1 alone would send the owners into a tizzy. Some of you don’t get how these owners are. Their greed is beyond any average person’s imagination.

  38. I wonder how many of the ones criticizing player compensation complain to their employers that they’re overpaid? How many on their jobs are one keystroke away from losing their livelihoods? How many face the possibility of somebody coming in every year being evaluated to take their job?

  39. A player owned league? Never happen.

    If they turn down this deal, they better all start saving for what is coming next season. The next negotiated CBA will be much harder to achieve and the owners will just fill the ranks with new draftee’s and XFL type players. The NFLPA will be forced to go to court/Congress to try and get some sort of redress. In the meantime, the NFL will move on with their new TV contracts signed this year. Will there be a drop in revenue? Sure. Will the fan base drop? Sure. Will the NFL survive and then thrive? Sure.

  40. First off it’s ridicules that anybody gets paid multi millions of dollars to play sports. Number two, people spend way too much money on entertaining themselves. Fans should be a little upset, as you guys are the ones paying for it. Me personally I paid 99$ last year to watch NFL Gamepass and that’s it. The Super Bowl was the only game I watched live and I personally do not care what they do. They can have my 99$ next season, or not. Money, money, money, and it’s never enough, every guy has to be paid way more than the next, just to justify himself. They should split the profit and play the lower level guys more and top A LOT less. Plus the owners should have to spend the cap every season. But then again it’s not my money

  41. Sure, Pouncey and his friends making loads of money are all socialists ready to share the wealth to fight the oppressors. But once the paychecks stop, this will turn into duck-duck-goose as it becomes “every man for himself” in no time at all.
    Owners know this, they have the only true leverage. You can’t force your boss to do ANYTHING, he owns the business. You can work there, or you can leave. You can’t force them to give you a job on your terms. There’s lots and lots of guys ready to step on the field the minute you refuse to play. The NFLPA will fold. They may hash out some more terms, but they will play.

  42. Why do people side with billionaires who don’t even pay for their stadiums?

  43. The nfl failed miserably with replacement refs and you think they’d succeed with replacement players 😂😂 I’m sure 80k fans would pack every standouts just dying to watch a bunch of replacement players

  44. Why do people side with the billionaires more than the millionaires? The players care about the fans a lot more than the owners do. Each owner makes more money than all their players combined.

    Who do you see when you watch the games, the players or the owners?

  45. Why would a fund even be needed (other than individual stupidity)? The lowest paid active players made over $500,000 each year. They ALL knew there could be a work stoppage. They should have adjusted and with that kind of money it is EASY to do. The only players who might struggle are the practice squad guys. Everybody else that is in a bind due to a work stoppage is there due to their own choice.

  46. An unemployment fund for millionaires.
    That’s probably the most USA thing to happen in the USA this week.

  47. clashpoint says:
    March 2, 2020 at 8:01 am
    Why do people side with the billionaires more than the millionaires? The players care about the fans a lot more than the owners do. Each owner makes more money than all their players combined.

    Who do you see when you watch the games, the players or the owners?

    ———————————

    The logo on the front, not the name on the back. The Green Bay packers financials are all online. Feel free to look at them and tell us how the team makes more money than the players, because they don’t.

    The Green Bay packers profit in 2018 was $78 mill and in 2019 was $724,000. That averages out to a little more than they are paying Aaron Rogers.

    If all the players were replaced tomorrow I would still root for the Eagles.

    While i can appreciate what the players do for the team this isn’t the 1970s in terms of player benefits. Everything is percentage based so if the league makes more money, the players make more money.

  48. I use to be a diehard NFL fan but now I rarely watch a full game and am enjoying my Sundays much more. If I want to watch football there is always college games.

  49. If the players would strike and somehow form their own league (highly doubtful) at what field would they play the games at and at what cost to rent the stadiums?

  50. broncosroe says:
    March 1, 2020 at 11:45 pm
    The nfl failed miserably with replacement refs and you think they’d succeed with replacement players 😂😂 I’m sure 80k fans would pack every standouts just dying to watch a bunch of replacement players

    However replacement players would earn a fraction of what NFL players make. Even if the stadium was totally empty , the league gets the TV revenue.

  51. A lot of these owners are billionaires on paper only. Rooney (Steelers) has a net worth of $1.35 billion, but more than 90% of that is in the value of the Steelers. It is an asset, for sure, but unless he sells the team, it is an asset in name only. This is true of many small market teams in the NFL.

  52. If the NFL has another work stoppage that is going to seriously hurt the league. It took a while to regain fans after the kneeling situation and some fans have not returned. If you have a stoppage then you are going to continue to see college football grow and the interest in the NFL decline. The league is already having trouble filling the stadiums up these days due to ticket prices.

  53. ATTN: NFL PLAYERS

    Most of you weren’t even born yet during the 1987 strike, which lasted 3 weeks in the middle of the season (Brady was 9, Brees was 7, Rivers was 5)

    Talk to some of the players who decided to strike then…might quickly change your minds.

    Go negotiate the best CBA you can now…it won’t get much better!

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