Another year, another Wonderlic leak

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The NFL continues to conduct the meaningless Wonderlic test at the Scouting Combine. And the NFL continues to fail to secure the results of the meaningless Wonderlic test.
We got out of the business of reporting or repeating Wonderlic scores a while ago, for plenty of reasons. First, plenty of prospects don’t know about the test. Second, plenty of prospects don’t care about the test. Third, the score means nothing when it comes to football ability. Fourth, the NFL’s failure to secure the numbers does a disservice to the players who voluntarily submit to the test. Fifth, all things considered, the release of scores tends to make players look bad, because plenty of fans don’t fully understand the dynamics, and they assume that a low score means a player is stupid. It most definitely doesn’t.
Yet again, Bob McGinn has gotten the numbers from someone within the league, someone who shouldn’t have disclosed the numbers. Yet again, Bob McGinn has published them. Yet again, we won’t repeat them here.
The league can and will secure any and all information that it wants to secure, like the five years of random tests of football air pressure the would, if disclosed, gut the findings of the #Deflategate investigation. But the league can’t and won’t secure the Wonderlic scores.
So we won’t report them here. It serves no purpose other than to make players look dumb, when in reality they either didn’t know about the test, didn’t care about the test, and/or didn’t prepare for the test.
And yet the league continues to conduct the Wonderlic test, due to the irrational desire for apples-to-apples information across all draft classes, presumably all the way back to the days of Red Grange. And we’ll continue to ignore the inevitable leaks and the inevitable reports that presume these numbers have actual meaning when in reality they simply do not.

48 responses to “Another year, another Wonderlic leak

  1. Jake Fromm: 35

    Joe Burrow: 34

    Jordan Love: 27

    Justin Herbert: 25

    Jacob Eason: 23

    Tua Tagovailoa: 19(McGinn falsely reported 13)

    Jalen Hurts: 18

  2. You wont publish them…but you will definitely direct us where to find them…maybe even if we cant spell Bob McGinn…..WONDERFUL

  3. “Yet again, Bob McGinn has gotten the numbers from someone within the league, someone who shouldn’t have disclosed the numbers. Yet again, Bob McGinn has published them. Yet again, we won’t repeat them here.”

    But we will run a story deploring the leaking of Wonderlic scores so anyone with cursory skills using Google can obtain the results they would not have known were available if we had not posted this story

  4. To be fair the falsely reported 13 was true. But, it was taken in 2018. The 2019 score was 19. Remember when Vince Young got a 5. Not even sure how someone can tie their shoe with a 5

  5. If it’s so meaningless, why would it matter if scores got leaked? All the other stuff is just as meaningless. 40 yard dash times. High jumps. Shuttle runs. Bench press. The only thing that tells you how good a guy will play football is by watching him play football. But that makes too much sense doesn’t it, and most people are lazy, so they’re always looking for shortcuts. People wonder why there are 32 teams, yet one team seems to get to the super bowl almost every year. Is he that smart, or are the others just, you know?

  6. I agree with Florio here. Even SAT scores, for instance, aren’t public knowledge. The Wonderlic test probably reveals nothing about creativity or critical thinking skills. And it can stigmatize a kid in a serious way. Nothing is worse for a young adult than to think they are dumb based on some outdated test.

  7. PTF was always the first to make fun of somebody for a low score. Why so sanctimonious now?

  8. Lester Hayes got a 2. But he overcame that and a speech impediment to snag 13 interceptions in 1980 albeit with the aid of a gooey compound called stickum.

  9. Don’t ever try to correct me stalker.

    You tried to steal and post info from a post of mine in another thread and still got it wrong.

    Tua scored a 19 at the *2020 combine.

    Try to keep up👌

  10. You say that Wonderlic scores mean nothing for football, but is that actually true? This should be an easy thing to stuff and confirm either way. I’m not presuming that they are meaningful, but anecdotally guys who score extraordinarily low tend to have a tougher learning curve…perhaps due to learning limitations, or perhaps because there is an indirect connection, such as scoring super low indicating a lack of effort that then translates to the effort the player makes to develop? Or, the anecdotal connection might not hold up over all results.

  11. The wonderlic is completely useless unless someone scores so low that you have to question their reading comprehension. I mean Ryan Fitzpatrick has the highest wonderlic score in QB history, yet is one of the poorest decision makers in the NFL. Haskins got a 37 last year but apparently can’t learn the playbook. Understanding an NFL playbook and more importantly having the football skill and instincts to translate on the field can’t be measured by a silly general comprehension test. Dan Marino and Lamar Jackson both scored under 15 and did just fine learning the playbook and showing it on the field.

  12. To be fair learning a playbook and studying film does require some level of intelligence

  13. Bob McGinn is a bit of a putz.
    He worked for the Milw Journal as a sports writer.
    He covered the Green Bay Packers until they denied him his credentials.
    McGinn had been unfairly critical of the franchise and there was rumor he had conflict with the Packers front office concerning his reporting.

    Whether that’s true or not, IDK for sure…. but we do know he wasn’t one of the Packers favorites. That’s for sure.

  14. How, with a straight face, can anyone suggest that players don’t know about the test? Each and every one has an agent, and it’s their job to tell them so they do.
    “… the release of scores tends to make players look bad, because plenty of fans don’t fully understand the dynamics, and they assume that a low score means a player is stupid. It most definitely doesn’t.” It may not mean they are stupid, but a low score certainly doesn’t mean they are smart.
    If everything is equal, the smarter person will prevail even in a mostly physical match up.

  15. I think (therefore I am,I think) a low Wonderlic score shows a lack of preparation just as much,or more so,than a low IQ.

  16. Intelligence tests first applied in football by Paul Brown. He wanted to know the basic intelligence of the player to understand how well he might be able to teach the player, as he saw his primary role as a coach was that of teacher. Many players have succeeded in great part due to their intelligence. A larger number of players have failed in the league because they are dumber than rocks (it is a technical game, far more than any other sport, 11 moving parts on both sides on each play)

  17. Nothing is worse for a young adult than to think they are dumb based on some outdated test.
    ______

    I can think of far worse things for a young adult…

  18. The Wonderlich isn’t so much of an intelligence test as it is a test to determine quick cognitive thinking. Here are some examples,….

    If a piece of rope cost 20 cents per 2 feet, how many feet can you buy for 30 dollars?

    Which of the numbers in this group represents the smallest amount? a) 0.3 b) 0.08 c) 1 d) 0.33

    A high-speed train travels 25 feet in 1/3 second. In 4 seconds, the train will have traveled __?__ feet.

    A clock lost 2 minutes and 36 seconds in 78 days. How many seconds did it lose per day?

  19. If it happens every year, which it does, then why does it warrant the commentary? Back meet hand. My own.

  20. First, plenty of prospects don’t know about the test.”
    —————————-

    Excuses. Who goes into a job interview so UNPREPARED? Does the prospect not have an agent?

  21. “Second, plenty of prospects don’t care about the test.”
    ————————

    Excuses. If my future boss cares about it, guess what, I CARE about it and make sure I’m PREPARED.

  22. “Third, the score means nothing when it comes to football ability.”
    ———————-

    Excuses. Understanding and quick thinking skills are CONSTANTLY being applied ON THE FIELD. If a LB takes a split second late to diagnose the play, he’ll be blown by. Thinking skills are CRITICAL.

  23. “Fourth, the NFL’s failure to secure the numbers does a disservice to the players who voluntarily submit to the test.”
    ————————-

    All 32 teasm have access to the scores & combine results. There’s not much confidentiality when it’s widespread distributed. And the wonderlic score is just another test result, just like the 40yd time, bench press, etc. No different.

  24. “Fifth, all things considered, the release of scores tends to make players look bad, because plenty of fans don’t fully understand the dynamics, and they assume that a low score means a player is stupid.”
    ———————-

    Excuses. Fans can evaluate it anyway they want. Who cares. It’s how the GMs and teams evaluate it that matters.

  25. Bob would have a higher Wonderlic score than most reporters. He has always been a straight shooter and I admire that. Has always told it like it is. Most people can’t handle that. I miss his pre-draft ratings in the Milwaukee paper. Just like Hub Arkush. A legend.

  26. The Wonderlic does serve a specific purpose, it’s a tool, one of many, that personnel men and GMs use to gauge the skill levels necessary to work in the high pressure environment of the NFL.
    And yes, game tape, 40 times, bench presses and three cone drills are equally as important.

    I’ve taken one of these tests before and I’ll tell you this much, it isn’t necessarily about overall intelligence as it is critical thinking.
    Since the test is timed, you are constantly second guessing yourself even when an answer seems obvious.
    I think the timed design of the test is exactly what GM’s want to know about possible prospects.
    It’s about decision making under fire.

    We can all come up with a couple of examples where players buck the trend one way or another, and the next few years will be no different.
    But, trust me, if it didn’t serve a useful purpose, teams wouldn’t insist on using it as one of their barometers.

  27. “Bob McGinn is a bit of a putz.
    He worked for the Milw Journal as a sports writer.
    He covered the Green Bay Packers until they denied his credentials.”
    ___________

    He’s much more than a bit of a putz. McGinn turned totally negative on the Packers long before they kicked him out. He continually lies about having talked to “anonymous” scouts.

    And, the kicker is that McGinn repeatedly reported that TT was suffering from Alzheimer’s. He is a worthless piece of excrement.

  28. “Nothing is worse for a young adult than to think they are dumb based on some outdated test.”

    Nothing is worse huh?

    18 & 19 years old who’ve served in war probably disagree with you.

  29. Wafflestomp, how did Tom Brady do with the 40, three cone, and bench press? They are completely worthless “tools” for judging QB success at the NFL level.

  30. A lot of the top athletes at football factories have tutors doing much of their classwork. Why wouldn’t a smart future draftee look ahead and learn a few things about Wonderlich test taking? Does a lawyer not know he’s going to have to take the Bar? Or an accountant the CPA exam?
    Let them use calculators – it’s more about understanding the logic. That’s probably part of the problem – people their age not used to long hand math.

  31. I like to see how low they score, it relates to how they play, how they talk at
    post game interviews, and how many times the get in trouble

  32. Question no 1 — How do you spell “Wonderlic?”

    Question no 2 — what color is an orange?

    Question no 3 — who’s buried in Grant’s tomb?

    Question no 4 — How far will a car traveling 30 miles an hour go in an hour?

    Question no 5 — Are there more quarters in a football game or in a dollar?

    End of test.

    End of test.

  33. In another sport, I have no quarrel with firing, etc. of Larsen. However, all the opinions expressed along the way have never mentioned, or suggested, that he might be forgiven. It seems a lot of folks need training for forgiveness. And, the one most hoped for to do so merely added fuel. Sad

  34. Instead ofposting the scores, how about posting the test questions so we can get a feel of what they are dealing with.

  35. What could possibly gut the findings of the inflategate investigation? Do you not remember the deflators text? Do you not remember Brady destroying his phone and quite a bit of evidence?

    Brady is a playoff cheat. The only injustice is that he wasn’t suspended in playoff games rather than games at the first of some later season. Cheating in the playoffs is a smart move.

  36. theitalianarmy says:
    April 18, 2020 at 5:46 pm
    AND … Shoe less Joe Jackson was illiterate but he could play some ball.
    _________________________________

    And on the D side of the ball the Wonderlic doesn’t matter as much because it’s the re-action side, now the O that’s a completely different story!

    Name me 5 QBs that scored under a 20 that were worth a crap, sure there are a few exceptions to the rule and some will mention Jackson but the Ravens completely rewrote the playbook for Jackson so he didn’t have to learn their playbook, it was redesigned with plays he was used to running. Same with RGIII his rookie season(that’s why he had a good 1st year) but in year 2 Shanahan told RGIII he had to learn the Redskins playbook and that’s where RGIII’s problems started and it could have been foreseen by his Wonderlic score.

    Bottom line is for most positions the Wonderlic doesn’t matter a whole lot but for QB’s nothing, nothing better tells how fast and well a QB can grasp and memorize the teams playbook!

    Sure the Wonderlic isn’t perfect but neither is the Combine or Pro Day where QBs go out in shorts and a tee against no pass rush with no defenders on the recievers to see how well they can throw and yet people totally rearrange their draft boards over it, WHAT? ARE YOU KIDDIN’ ME!

  37. “It serves no purpose other than to make players look dumb, when in reality they either didn’t know about the test, didn’t care about the test, and/or didn’t prepare for the test.”

    “And we’ll continue to ignore the inevitable leaks and the inevitable reports that presume these numbers have actual meaning when in reality they simply do not.”
    _____________________________________

    First off after all this time(50+yrs) if any player says they didn’t know they would have to take the Wonderlic test they’re either lying or totally stupid!

    And if you think the Wonderlic doesn’t matter when it comes to a QB then you aren’t very smart either, the Wonderlic tells how fast a QB can grasp a teams system/playbook. VY had a very low Wonderlic score and you could tell by watching him play that he never really caught on to the playbook. Another telling QB when it came to the test was Johnny Football, he couldn’t even call a play correctly after two years, Joe Thomas said a few times he always had to help Johnny out with the playcalling in the huddle. I heard Johnny a few times in interviews and they ask him to call a couple of plays and he’d spit out a play and always ended with “or something like that”, now how do yuou think that sounds to othet players in the huddle when your QB can’t even call the play correctly?

    And as far as QBs who scored under 20, well there’s ONLY 1 that ever won a SB, if that isn’t meaningful I don’t know what is!

  38. Just take players SAT or ACT scores and be done with it. If these scores are good enough for colleges and universities, they should be good enough for the NFL.

  39. “Bob McGinn is a bit of a putz.
    He worked for the Milw Journal as a sports writer.
    He covered the Green Bay Packers until they denied him his credentials.
    McGinn had been unfairly critical of the franchise . . .”

    IMO putz is being kind. McGinn was miserable to read towards the end in GB. He could never get over Ted Thompson not welcoming Favre back with open arms the year he unretired and the gunslinger got replaced by a future MVP and hall of fame talent. McGinn would regularly decry websites started by individual sportswriters to make money. Then he up and retired and did the very same thing he’d hated on for years.

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