NCAA president confirms there can’t be college football without college

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NCAA president Mark Emmert recently confirmed something that seemed fairly obvious from the get-go of the pandemic: There can be no college football without college.

“College athletes are college students, and you can’t have college sports if you don’t have college [campuses] open and having students on them,” Emmert said on the NCAA’s Twitter channel, via the New York Post. “You don’t want to ever put student-athletes at greater risk than the rest of the student body.”

Emmert’s right. But there’s another principle at play here. You also don’t want to admit that college football players don’t play college football as a supplement to the college experience. That would be the biggest step toward admitting that college football isn’t about college at all, and that the student-athletes who play the game aren’t really students but cogs in a billion-dollar machine.

As a result of the reality that the student-athletes who play the game aren’t really students but cogs in a billion-dollar machine, the concept of the open campus likely will be malleable.

“That doesn’t mean [schools have] to be up and running in the full normal model, but you’ve got to treat the health and well-being of the athletes at least as much as the regular students,” Emmert said. “So, if a school doesn’t reopen, then they’re not going to be playing sports. It’s really that simple.”

The notion of reopening colleges creates plenty of questions and concerns, from multiple students wedged into oversized closets masquerading as dorm rooms to shared facilities to the freshman-15 food-trough cafeterias to the tendency of people in the 18-21 age range to congregate collectively and consume copious amounts of alcohol or something stronger before retiring in groups of two (maybe more) to one of those oversized closets masquerading as dorm rooms to nibble at a bowl of wild oats.

As with the NFL, however, there’s too much money at stake for college football to press pause for a year. Thus, look for the NCAA to establish a baseline definition for “open campus” that almost passes the smell test, and that preserves the sweet scent of freshly-minted TV money.

26 responses to “NCAA president confirms there can’t be college football without college

  1. Without college football, the eco- structure of the state of Alabama would collapse.

  2. Another brilliant proclamation by the NCAA.

    In other news, water is wet.

  3. Sounds like he’s a little worried about his monetary source drying up because we all know he doesn’t care about the students. Even NCAA athletes know that it’s all one big exploitative con.

  4. I imagine there will be a lot of changes coming to college education, with a good deal of it being done electronically. The TV revenue generated from college football will be very helpful toward off-setting all those costs.

  5. Why do people keep pushing this “billion dollar industry” garbage? All but a handful of schools either break even or lose money on their sports programs. Outside of the largest power five schools, most lose money once they’ve financed all of the other sports, like women’s basketball and soccer.

  6. charliecharger says:
    May 10, 2020 at 3:39 pm
    I imagine there will be a lot of changes coming to college education, with a good deal of it being done electronically. The TV revenue generated from college football will be very helpful toward off-setting all those costs.

    ***************************************************************************************

    What costs? Faculty and instructors who have to spend more of their time porting courses from face-to-face to virtual aren’t going to get paid more to do that, so no cost there. If classes aren’t being taught in buildings and spaces like on-campus cafeterias aren’t operating (or at far reduced capacity), there’s less work needed to keep said spaces maintained and heated. Colleges definitely aren’t going to give students a discount on tuition, even though many students perceive virtual education to be lower in fidelity, quality, and value. Schools are going to make money no matter what.

  7. Everyone needs to watch the Real Sports and their expose of the NCAA. It exposes the myth of the “student-athlete”. Of course they have to say “no school, no Football”, but in their hearts they really want to do their football-thing whether or not there are any classes

  8. Will try this again as my first post was presumably too inflammatory.

    A college education is the biggest scam going and NCAA sports are right there with it. The faculty, coaches, Ads & administrators, contractors and vendors are making money hand over fist on the backs of national student debt running off the charts. The ripple effect of student debt is incalculable at this point and it’s getting worse. The last thing I could give a rats a$$ about is whether or not Alabama and the other corrupt semi-pro teams get to play ball this year.

    First thing they should do is cut every “professors” and athletic directors salary in half and distribute it as an institutional reduction in tuition costs. That’d be a nice place to start.

  9. in72 says:

    May 10, 2020 at 5:16 pm
    How’s the football team looking at Trump University this season

    Don’t know about the FB team. But I’ve read the Trump University is going to re-open and offer 10 week medical degrees.

  10. fin72 says:
    May 10, 2020 at 5:16 pm
    How’s the football team looking at Trump University this season
    ——————-
    Probably would of had better recruits if the president before him didn’t give millions and millions of dollars to the Middle East before his term ended.

  11. “College athletes are college students, and you can’t have college sports if you don’t have college [campuses] open and having students on them,” Emmert said on the NCAA’s Twitter channel, via the New York Post. “You don’t want to ever put student-athletes at greater risk than the rest of the student body.”

    Emmert’s right.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    No. He really isn’t. Every student athlete is at greater risk than the rest of the student body. Any smidgen of actual thought would get you there but since he said something the author likes the thinking stopped right there and then shifted back to a favorite subject about oppressors and the “oppressed.”

  12. Probably would of had better recruits if the president before him didn’t give millions and millions of dollars to the Middle East before his term ended.

    Coach “Bone Spurs” is the BEST recruiter EVER!!!!

  13. alonestartexan says:
    May 10, 2020 at 4:22 pm
    Why do people keep pushing this “billion dollar industry” garbage? All but a handful of schools either break even or lose money on their sports programs. Outside of the largest power five schools, most lose money once they’ve financed all of the other sports, like women’s basketball and soccer.
    ———
    It seems you’ve really not done any type of meaningful analysis of this subject have you? Schools don’t “break-even” because they want to keep up this charade that their athletics department isn’t a business. Since they don’t have to pay their athletes and they funnel ungodly sums into their facilities and pay their athletic admins and coaches hyper inflated salaries. Any business can always spend any amount and claim they’re struggling to break even.
    I have a family member who makes north of $200,000 and cries broke all the time. He claims he pays so much for school for his 3 kids (private school), has a huge expensive home and a second home plus a couple of luxury cars. Meanwhile I don’t make anywhere close to what he makes but I’m still able to save money. It’s the same thing with these “struggling” schools. You claim that they’re struggling because they have to support other sports but the real reason they’re “struggling” is due to the ungodly amount spent on coaches, admins, and facilities and I really wish this excuse they keep using will be put to rest.

  14. the vast majority of college football player’s don’t end up in nfl.

    I will agree that most of them think they will and end up after college eligibility with nothing.

    some however especially division 2 and lower don’t. and there are other sports besides football and basketball.

  15. Florio wrote:
    The notion of reopening colleges creates plenty of questions and concerns, from multiple students wedged into oversized closets masquerading as dorm rooms to shared facilities to the freshman-15 food-trough cafeterias to the tendency of people in the 18-21 age range to congregate collectively and consume copious amounts of alcohol or something stronger before retiring in groups of two (maybe more) to one of those oversized closets masquerading as dorm rooms to nibble at a bowl of wild oats.

    That paragraph my friend was a brilliant piece of word-smithing! Bravo dude, Bravo!

  16. patriotmaleorgy says:
    May 10, 2020 at 5:57 pm
    Probably would of had better recruits if the president before him didn’t give millions and millions of dollars to the Middle East before his term ended.

    You do realize that every president including the current one gives money to the Middle East.

  17. When are folks going to get this through their thick skulls? There will be both college and NFL this year. They’re not going to throw away billions of dollars over a virus. They’ll come up with a plan that will make folks comfortable. But only the naive thinks that these folks will make dollars and cents decisions, and not life decisions. They’re not throwing away billions for something effecting only 1% of the world population.

  18. Because, as we know, free tuition, boarding, equipment, coaching, and a stage to audition for a multi-million dollar payday is abusive.

  19. how is it glossed over that the driving force here is not just money, but financial avarice?

    anyone can conjure up a profit and loss statement that claims an operation is in the red;

    that’s been the tax dodge of every millionaire and mega-billion corporation since the real Republican president created income tax;

    there’s too much money to be made by supporting industries and advertising to allow the Alabamas and other Universities of Spoilt Children to remain dormant for an indefinite period of time;

    ‘education’ has been reduced to a hypocritical cover long before Grantland Rice and the Four Horsemen, even before the time the service academies were the preiminent football powers and girls played basketball standing in place in skirts;

    50,000 people didn’t show up for a science experiment back then, either, and thousands of players left school maimed—if alive—sans a degree or employment options;

    schools will reopen under some sham similar to the annual dodges of the Rooney Rule or President Bone Spurs the Draft Dodger another chapter of the athletic theatre of the academically absurd will reopen for business as usual;

  20. To infectorman:

    Faculty are getting rich? In what world are you living in? I actually taught NCAA Division 1 athletes at a university where we won a national champion ship in the 2010s.

    As a doctoral student, I taught undergraduate courses with 100 students. I got paid a whopping $18,000 a year, a tuition waiver (does not include fees like rec center access), I had to use student parking, and we had to threaten a walkout to get health insurance.

    As for faculty, they were paid (starting) roughly $65,000 plus a few benefits. Some negotiated more frequent computer replacements, travel money, etc, but that’s what faculty got paid.

    And for the record, I’m in a STEM field. Specifically, I’m in the technology field. Our football coach got paid more than our entire department combined and we had cyber security researchers working on artificial intelligence.

    So please, spare me the is whole b.s. about faculty getting rich. The only people getting paid are football coaches and maybe administrators. But the faculty don’t get paid.

    Also, I taught players on the football team, some were smart and actively participated in classroom and some only got by because the football team hired tutors. That said, I gave them 100% every day. They were not given special treatment by me. Although, I know full well that the football players got paid tutors that helped them pass classes.

    Some players, one of which in the NFL today, basically got to ditch class and do everything online because he was the QB. But that was for the best because he was a distraction when he was on campus.

  21. “Why do people keep pushing this “billion dollar industry” garbage?”
    __________________-

    Because if your industry makes a billion dollars it literally IS a billion dollar industry.

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