Draft-compensation proposal is part of broader overhaul of NFL hiring processes

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Friday’s reporting regarding the incentives that teams will realize for hiring minority head coaches and General Managers and for promoting the mobility of minority assistant coaches into positions that will assist their development may be just the beginning. The league could be moving toward revolutionary changes to the way coaches are hired.

“The old hiring system is dead,” said one source with knowledge of the dynamics of the situation.

Incentives for hiring minority coaches and General Managers are just part of a broader effort to enhance diversity on a league-wide basis. The league, the Fritz Pollard Alliance, and others have been working on a wide range of minority hiring initiatives in recent months.

Potential changes include adjusting the hiring period for head coaches, eliminating the ability of teams to deny permission for an assistant coach to interview for coordinator jobs or the quarterback coach position, and expanding the diversity initiative to address senior executive opportunities. The new program is expected to be rolled out over the course of the next two years, with careful evaluation of the manner in which the adjustments are working.

“It is going to be a comprehensive and dynamic process,” the source said.

Thus, despite the focus on the draft-pick enticements that have been proposed for hiring minority coaches and General Managers, the league will be addressing the situation far more broadly and comprehensively, in an effort to solve a problem that the original Rooney Rule, despite its good intentions, has not yet fully resolved.

25 responses to “Draft-compensation proposal is part of broader overhaul of NFL hiring processes

  1. A true post-discrimination world is one that returns to weighing people organically on their merits. Thankfully, sports teams have had an incentive for a long time to drop discrimination and choose players organically, and so that has been one of our earlier post-discrimination areas. On the other hand, there is a lot of evidence that the low minority numbers in NFL coaching and front offices is simply an organic development and not the result of discrimination…and yet it is being treated as the result of discrimination and thus a problem. If it actually is discrimination, these efforts by the NFL are good…but if the numbers are in fact the result of organic developments and not discrimination, these efforts will be damaging in their own right. It’s a shame there is so much rush to judgement here, but bias to assume discrimination (true or not…it often is true) is strong.

  2. The league should have equal representation of players as well. You can’t force upper management restrictions without doing the same with its workforce.

  3. I really appreciate the continued efforts of the Fritz Pollard Alliance and the NFL leadership for doing their part to fight the intellectual brain drain being caused by the continued failure to bring hiring practices more in line with the reality of the current era, where minorities are taken seriously in every line of work and in every industry outside of the Good Ole Boys network that leads to situations where a highly successful coordinator, Brenston Buckner, is fired for a 70 year old has been / failed coach, Rod Marinelli. Kudos to all involved and Kudos to PFT for giving this very serious problem all the attention it deserves.

  4. If this passes I’m done with the NFL. You mean to tell me a team will move up 12-15 spots in the draft just because they hire a minority HC and GM? Ridiculous. Hire on merit not skin tone. The good old boy network in the NFL is dying off (and good riddance) things will change.

  5. I like the proposed changes listed in this article except the draft pick incentive. The compensation pick program has shown that teams will game the system to get the most picks possible. At least the smarter teams do and those smarter teams will take advantage of these new possible changes by hiring minority GM’s on a short contract to get the draft pick boost. As long as teams have Head Coaches with more power then a GM then this will possibly happen. Houston or New England could do this as an example. Not saying they would though.

  6. America has always been about equal opportunity. It has never been about equal outcome.

  7. The only part I agree with is eliminating the opportunity to deny an interview request.

  8. All you have to do is take a look at Eric Bieniemy. If you can justify that, then the NFL can justify what they’re doing.

  9. a recipe for disaster. the NFL is the most powerful sports league in the US, wildly successful and lucrative. why are they trying to destroy themselves from within?

  10. Patrick H says:
    May 17, 2020 at 11:02 pm
    I really appreciate the continued efforts of the Fritz Pollard Alliance and the NFL leadership for doing their part to fight the intellectual brain drain being caused by the continued failure to bring hiring practices more in line with the reality of the current era, where minorities are taken seriously in every line of work and in every industry outside of the Good Ole Boys network that leads to situations where a highly successful coordinator, Brenston Buckner, is fired for a 70 year old has been / failed coach, Rod Marinelli. Kudos to all involved and Kudos to PFT for giving this very serious problem all the attention it deserves.
    ================================

    And anyone hired as a result of this policy should feel what exactly? Proud? Like they were hired because of their talent and merit?

    Or like they were a pawn in a game for a team to get a better draft position?

    I don’t know how someone could get a job through these means and feel any sort of sense of true accomplishment.

    I feel for the Bieniemy’s of the world, because this type of pandering is just embarrassing and insulting.

  11. I just don’t see how this works in reality with draft incentives. Teams that have new hires are generally bad teams and thus as the top of the round drafting – see Redskins as an example, if they get a boost of enough slots, they move into the second round. What if the team has already traded that pick away and doesn’t have a third rounder.

    If you want to say no one is denied the ability to talk with anyone that is fine. Though many asst coaches et al. use the organization as cover to deny an interview.

    As for Bieniemy, it is simple a matter of timing. Not many teams are going to hire a coach that has to wait 6 weeks or so before that guy can act as the HC for his new team. That doesn’t seem like a lot but you are basically losing 1/3 of your time to prepare for the draft. Further, you get behind the eight ball because it delays time your need to hire assistants. All those guys hired in the 1st week can have a month’s jump on hiring assistant coaches. Guys you might want will be gone to new teams. Guys like Bieniemy are still preparing for the Super Bowl. Not many teams are willing to wait on their coach. I think on SF with Kyle Shanahan has done it more recently.

  12. So teams with coach/GM stability get punished by having a team leapfrog them in the draft?

  13. Why wouldn’t a minority GM make sure he signs 1 year deals? Imagine if Andrew Berry signed a 1 year deal. Every year he’d be in demand for a team that wants better picks and he can always stay with the Browns if it’s going well. He’s already the youngest GM in the league and showed he can draft and manage a FO as well as anyone has managed the Browns.

    Teams that are going to want to tank can hire Hue Jackson for one year. Not only will he make sure your team under-performs but he also gets your GM some better picks for the tank year.

  14. In this reality, what’s to stop Bill Belichick from hiring a (very well-qualified, so as to make it plausible) puppet GM just because they’re a minority and he can get some draft compensation…? Nobody has consistently won with annual roster construction under the current draft pick compensation formula the way he has. And we know the man loves to bend the rules and exploit loopholes in rules regarding on-field play. Don’t even try & convince me that he and some others will not try to game the system.

  15. “Guys like Bieniemy are still preparing for the Super Bowl.”
    _______________

    This is true but Bieniemy is a tough example. He gets brought up constantly as somebody who has been passed over but he has a single season under his belt as a coordinator and he doesn’t actually the call the plays. Both of those are big deals that would give anybody legitimate pause. There have been guys repeatedly passed over in the past but Bieniemy is not one of them.

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