Packers issue powerful video calling for change

Getty Images

The Green Bay Packers have created a video calling for change in the wake of recent events. It is powerful.

It features the faces and voices of multiple Packers players, both white and black. The speakers include coach Matt LaFleuer and quarterback Aaron Rodgers.

“Antiquated laws and legislation need to be amended or repealed, especially those that prejudicially bias people of color,” Rodgers says in the video.

“The right actions speak a lot louder than the right words,” LaFleur adds.

But these are the words that resonate the most, from offensive lineman Billy Turner.

“I’m a human,” Turner says. “Just like all of you. My blood is red and my heart pumps that blood. I’m a human too.”

There is no middle ground on this issue of basic human rights, because this issue is fundamental to American and Judeo-Christian values. All men and women are created equal. All are guaranteed the fundamental rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. God loves us all, regardless of what we look like.

We are all human; the fact that it’s so obvious makes the need to say it incomprehensible. And the mottos in which so many of us take pride are meaningless if they are not honored and respected as to everyone.

It’s time for justice for all, once and for all. The point is undeniable, even if to date it has been unattainable. The decision of organizations like the Packers to use their platforms to call for change that should have come long ago will help to ensure that this moment will be the moment that gets us to the place where we really want to go.

The place where we should have been 244 years ago.

26 responses to “Packers issue powerful video calling for change

  1. Define the laws.
    Show me the laws/legislation that need to be repealed.
    Speaking in general terms will not cut it.

  2. I’m a little confused about this statement: “Antiquated laws and legislation need to be amended or repealed, especially those that prejudicially bias people of color,” which piece of legislation states that police needs to act tougher when they deal with people of color?

  3. I’m 100% for change. And 100% against the politically correct racial bias, and utter backlash people are bombed with when their view doesn’t perfectly align with twitter, or media, or fully endorse every action of protesters. You’re labeled with white privilege, and you better accept it. Walk on eggshells even when showing support. You may tag your blackout picture incorrectly, or not say enough or certainly the right terms in your post of support. Should everyone have an opinion? Or are we only allowed an opinion if media agrees? Believe it or not, change can happen, and progress can be made that helps communities most affected. But making it exclusively about race, and undertones of the need for atonement from actions in early history make no sense for today. I’m responsible for me, and you’re responsible for you. Lets work together for meaningful change that makes law enforcement accountable for their actions and racial profiling- against anyone. Not just blacks, or mexicans, or asians and so on.

  4. Now as a Vikings fan I’m starting to like Rodgers more and respect the Packers coaches.

  5. “All are guaranteed the fundamental rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”

    Does that include business owners who have been looted and beaten?

  6. There is no NFL player that speaks more intelligently and thoughtfully than Rodgers — not even close. I just wish he played in the AFC.

  7. There was very little criticism about “Locking Arms”. I encourage the continuation of that symbol of unity.

    The criticism was kneeling / sitting for the anthem and presentation of the flag.

    Respect the people who defended the flag. We owe it to them.

  8. WHAT. LAWS.

    I beg one person to show me one law or piece of legislation that says “treat black people differently.” This is a fantasy!

  9. Respect the people who defended the flag. We owe it to them.

    +++++

    People didn’t defend the “flag”, they defended the REPUBLIC (for which the flag stands).

    The Republic which is supposed to guarantee liberty and justice for ALL.

    Some get more upset about disrespect to the flag (symbol) or anthem (song) rather than the lack of justice. I don’t get it.

  10. I am proud of the Green Bay Packer organization, as I always am. An honest conversation must take place. When I say honest, I mean honest. Piling on one (side) isn’t honest, everyone has something they need to work on, everyone.

  11. Mandatory sentencing laws for drug use/possession affect blacks far more than whites. (the war on drugs was really a war on blacks.) Felons not being able to vote laws are still around. They were used by many southern states to limit black voters, especially in the early 20th century. (accuse a black person of a felony, an all white jury convicts, no vote.) Insurance company red-lining districts. Gerrymandering congressional districts. Even school districts getting school funding from property taxes affects poorer schools, (rural and urban) and helps wealthier (and predominantly white) students. These laws and remnants of them have been and still are used to discriminate against people of color. Try reading “The New Jim Crow” or “The Color of Law”.

  12. “The right actions speak a lot louder than the right words.”

    Not a surprise those words came from Matt LaFleur. Coaches and teams just issuing statements does not bring change. Be the change you want to see.

    #OneTeamOneNation

    #PackerNation!❤✌✊

  13. matthoover4 says:
    June 4, 2020 at 1:19 pm

    I beg one person to show me one law or piece of legislation that says “treat black people differently.” This is a fantasy!

    +++++

    I could show you plenty of instances where the enforcement of the laws or imposition of the penalties were different …. but I don’t think that would change your mind.

  14. There is some history here. Vince Lombardi, who could be course and obnoxious, was a pioneer. (Bart Starr pointed out that the Catholic Lombardi’s daily Mass attendance was necessary given his excessive tendencies.) Lombardi aggressively recruited and selected African American players to Green Bay–yes, little Green Bay–in the early 60’s when more than a few NFL franchises were still shying away from Black players.

    Including his one year (before his death) with the Washington franchise, Lombardi was also credited directly for insisting on fair treatment for several gay players–stating that any assistant coach who would question a player’s sexuality would be fired.

    Anyone who suggests athletes need to set aside their humanity and their voices under the “stay out of politics” cop out is entitled to stop watching real human beings playing football.

  15. I’m a little confused about this statement: “Antiquated laws and legislation need to be amended or repealed, especially those that prejudicially bias people of color,” which piece of legislation states that police needs to act tougher when they deal with people of color?
    —-

    Biden helped push through that terrible crime bill in the mid-90s. It was tough on blacks throughout the US, and Trump finally got rid of it. Thanks for nothing Joe.

  16. Lombardi was smart enough to know he could win with players other coaches were afraid to hire. He instinctively knew how to build the best teams. He was simply ahead of his time in many regards. RIP

  17. Very easy to ask for changes in laws and policing that adversely affect African Americans when you don’t have to live in the neighborhoods filled with crime. Instead they get to live in their gated communities that have very little crime.

    Twice as many unarmed whites were killed than blacks while black men make up 85% of violent crimes in America. While I will never condone abusive policing or bad cops, just maybe a little bit of effort should be given to treating black men how to behave when interacting with cops. The common theme among almost all of them is resisting arrest. The alternative is what happened in Baltimore after the cops pulled back and all kinds of crime went up.

  18. matthoover4 says:
    June 4, 2020 at 1:19 pm

    I beg one person to show me one law or piece of legislation that says “treat black people differently.” This is a fantasy!
    —————————————
    Are you really that naive? How about the cocaine laws? White people mainly snort it, Black people generally smoke it (crack). Both may have the same amount (in weight) of cocaine but the black man will get a MUCH longer sentence than the white man. That is one of many examples.

  19. 2019 Stats of police killings.
    Police killed 371 Whites
    Police killed 236 Blacks
    It’s not about racism … its criminal activity.
    Why no mention of the 3 great black policemen murdered during the riots

  20. packers291 says:
    June 4, 2020 at 12:24 pm
    “All are guaranteed the fundamental rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”

    Or as Joe Biden would say, ” Ya know, the thing.”

  21. Police killed 371 Whites
    Police killed 236 Blacks

    Whites are 72% of America
    Blacks are 14% of America

    Do you own math to see how dis proportionally they are killed by police.

  22. “Lombardi was also credited directly for insisting on fair treatment for several gay players–stating that any assistant coach who would question a player’s sexuality would be fired.”

    • • • • • • • •

    Vince Lombardi in fact had a younger brother who was gay.

  23. Please remember……the Green Bay Packers did not hesitate to address and respond to the concerns shared with most of their players. No other team did…..yet.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.