Patriots encouraging employees to read, reflect, listen on Juneteenth holiday

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The Patriots are closing Friday in commemoration of Juneteenth, a spokesman confirms.

The team is encouraging employees to read, reflect, listen and learn, wanting them to use the day to better understand the historical significance of the day.

The Patriots informed employees earlier this week that Friday would be a paid company holiday.

The holiday honors the emancipation of slaves after the Civil War, from the day Union troops landed in Texas with the news in 1865.

Every team and the NFL office will close in commemoration of Juneteenth.

7 responses to “Patriots encouraging employees to read, reflect, listen on Juneteenth holiday

  1. Why is it there has been no fuss made about this supposed holiday until now?

  2. Holy hell will rain down on any team that doesn’t close for the “holiday.”

  3. I’ll admit that although I had heard of Juneteenth, before this year I had zero idea what it commemorated. I just chalked it up as another made up holiday like “Arbor Day.” Boy was I wrong. I’m astonished and a bit embarrassed I didn’t have a clear idea of June 19th’s significance in not just African American history, but in our Nation’s history as a whole. Freedom is something we should all celebrate.

  4. Although Juneteenth is commonly thought of as celebrating the end of slavery in the United States, it was still legal and practiced in Union border states until December 6, 1865, when ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution abolished non-penal slavery nationwide.

  5. Angel Valle says:
    June 19, 2020 at 6:59 pm

    Although Juneteenth is commonly thought of as celebrating the end of slavery in the United States, it was still legal and practiced in Union border states until December 6, 1865, when ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution abolished non-penal slavery nationwide.

    *********************************

    So are you just providing more background information, or suggesting we shouldn’t be observing the significance of June 19th?

  6. If
    you aren’t interested in the history of Juneteenth, please keep scrolling.

    Today, Juneteenth is recognized as the day the last enslaved people learned of the Emancipation proclamation. It is important to recognize, however, that our criminal legal system has been used since to continue forced labor. Here is a slice of that history shared by a friend that you should know and understand: “In 1866, one year after the 13 Amendment was ratified (the amendment that ended slavery), Alabama, Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, Georgia, Mississippi, Florida, Tennessee, and South Carolina began to lease out convicts for labor (peonage). This made the business of arresting Blacks very lucrative, which is why hundreds of White men were hired by these states as police officers. Their primary responsibility was to search out and arrest Blacks who were in violation of Black Codes [Virginia also had Black Codes that made certain conduct criminal only for Black people.]. Once arrested, these men, women and children would be leased to plantations where they would harvest cotton, tobacco, sugar cane. Or they would be leased to work at coal mines, or railroad companies. The owners of these businesses would pay the state for every prisoner who worked for them; prison labor.

    It is believed that after the passing of the 13th Amendment, more than 800,000 Blacks were part of the system of peonage, or re-enslavement through the prison system. Peonage didn’t end until after World War II began, around 1940.

    This is how it happened.

    The 13th Amendment declared that “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.” (Ratified in 1865)

    Did you catch that? It says, “neither slavery nor involuntary servitude could occur except as a punishment for a crime”. Lawmakers used this phrase to make petty offenses crimes. When Blacks were found guilty of committing these crimes, they were imprisoned and then leased out to the same businesses that lost slaves after the passing of the 13th Amendment. This system of convict labor is called peonage.

    The majority of White Southern farmers and business owners hated the 13th Amendment because it took away slave labor. As a way to appease them, the federal government turned a blind eye when southern states used this clause in the 13th Amendment to establish laws called Black Codes. Here are some examples of Black Codes:

    In Louisiana, it was illegal for a Black man to preach to Black congregations without special permission in writing from the president of the police. If caught, he could be arrested and fined. If he could not pay the fines, which were unbelievably high, he would be forced to work for an individual, or go to jail or prison where he would work until his debt was paid off.

    If a Black person did not have a job, he or she could be arrested and imprisoned on the charge of vagrancy or loitering.

    This next Black Code will make you cringe. In South Carolina, if the parent of a Black child was considered vagrant, the judicial system allowed the police and/or other government agencies to “apprentice” the child to an “employer”. Males could be held until the age of 21, and females could be held until they were 18. Their owner had the legal right to inflict punishment on the child for disobedience, and to recapture them if they ran away.

    This (peonage) is an example of systemic racism – Racism established and perpetuated by government systems. Slavery was made legal by the U.S. Government. Segregation, Black Codes, Jim Crow and peonage were all made legal by the government, and upheld by the judicial system. These acts of racism were built into the system, which is where the term “Systemic Racism” is derived.

    This is the part of “Black History” that most of us were never told about.”

    (Copied and pasted from a friend. Please feel free to do the same!)”

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