Mark Andrews plans to play, despite having Type 1 diabetes

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More than a few NFL players have medical conditions that enhance the potential risks from a COVID-19 diagnosis. One player with Type 1 diabetes has made it clear that he’ll play in 2020.

Via Jonas Shaffer of the Baltimore Sun, Ravens tight end Mark Andrews said Wednesday that he will not opt out due to his health condition.

We’ve got a big year coming up,” Andrews said during a Zoom appearance in connection with the Children with Diabetes group. “I want to be able to do a lot of things, and . . . just being able to help this team win is exciting for me.”

Andrews’ decision underscores the reality that most players will choose to play, even if they have enhanced risk factors.

13 responses to “Mark Andrews plans to play, despite having Type 1 diabetes

  1. There was a small scale study done in an area in Italy that has one of the highest concentrations of type 1 diabetics in the world, and the preliminary results suggested that type 1 diabetics may actually be less susceptible to covid19 because of a particular type of immune system imbalance. However it’s true that if a type 1 diabetic were to be infected, they would be at higher risk for bad consequences.

  2. The game itself comes with risk factors. For that matter, everyday life comes with risk factors. Should be no surprise that most competitive athletes will decide to use proper due diligence and compete.

  3. Him using proper due diligence would mean he would opt out. I hope he lives not to regret this. Seems like, if the season even happens, transmission will be random, common, unavoidable. Look at the other sports that are mostly noncontact already. Look at the college football programs where practice has resumed.

  4. Good for him. My 6 year old daughter has recently been diagnosed with type 1. I like being able to tell her about people with successful careers and athletes that have type 1. First week was kinda rough but she’s a little warrior and seeing how well she’s been handling it has definitely made it easier on me and my wife. Im not surprised Andrews isn’t letting this hold him back. I’ve heard that type 1 diabetics with constant high blood sugar levels are the ones who are more susceptible to getting sick. If his blood sugar levels are in check then he should be fine.

  5. Bird2urmother, stay strong! I hope you guys concur this and it isn’t something that defines your daughter and that she learns to let it be something she can flaunt as a reason her achievement and that much more special! I have a 6 year old daughter and we want nothing but the world for them!

  6. bird2urmother

    I have an 11-year-old who was diagnosed with T1d when she was 8. It’s always rough in the beginning after the initial diagnosis. But it definitely gets better after they begin to accept and adjust. The hardest part is understanding that you never get a day off from having to deal with managing the condition. These kids quickly become troopers, who have to be more mature than their peers due to all the increased responsibilities they have to deal with. Keep sharing these examples with her…this type of encouragement can go a long way. My daughter is still able to do competitive gymnastics with her T1d. If you haven’t already, look into getting her a Constant Glucose Monitor…they are a HUGE help!

  7. demanrighthere says:
    July 16, 2020 at 1:00 pm
    Bird2urmother, stay strong! I hope you guys concur this and it isn’t something that defines your daughter and that she learns to let it be something she can flaunt as a reason her achievement and that much more special! I have a 6 year old daughter and we want nothing but the world for them
    —–
    Thank you. If there’s anyone in my family that can handle this, it’s definitely my little girl.

  8. redislander10 says:
    July 16, 2020 at 1:07 pm
    bird2urmother

    I have an 11-year-old who was diagnosed with T1d when she was 8. It’s always rough in the beginning after the initial diagnosis. But it definitely gets better after they begin to accept and adjust. The hardest part is understanding that you never get a day off from having to deal with managing the condition. These kids quickly become troopers, who have to be more mature than their peers due to all the increased responsibilities they have to deal with. Keep sharing these examples with her…this type of encouragement can go a long way. My daughter is still able to do competitive gymnastics with her T1d. If you haven’t already, look into getting her a Constant Glucose Monitor…they are a HUGE help!
    —–
    Thanks for your comment and support. From both of you guys that commented. Yes I’ve heard many stories of T1D kids growing up strong and independent. My daughter was already that way but even more so now. After about 1 week she was already doing her own finger pokes and checking her blood sugar levels on her own. Your comment about never getting a day off really hit home with me. That was probably the hardest part for me as her father. Not being able to ever tell her that this is almost over and we’ll be all better soon. With this whole covid thing, me and my wife had to alternate nights at the hospital with her. Sitting at the hotel all by myself with nothing on my mind but her health was really hard for me. Hearing her cry and telling me she doesn’t want any more pokies just broke my heart, but like you said, it gets easier. That first week home was hard and I had one rough moment the 2nd week, but since then it’s been so much better emotionally and I credit all of that to my little girl. Watching her take it in stride has made it so much easier and we’ll be getting her dexcom anyday now so I’m sure that will help. Thanks again and I wish you and your family nothing but health and success. We have strong little women!

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