Misdemeanor charge dropped against Robert Kraft

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With the case gutted by the inability to use the most important item of evidence, prosecutors had only one move left: To dismiss all charges.

Via the Associated Press, that’s what happened today regarding a misdemeanor count of solicitation against Patriots owner Robert Kraft.

Once an appeals court ruled that authorities violated the rights of Kraft and others via secretly-installed video cameras, and when prosecutors chose to walk away and/or to run instead of taking a losing argument to the Florida Supreme Court, dismissal became inevitable.

Prosecutors opted not to appeal the ruling because a loss at the highest court in Florida could have had “broader, negative implications” on future investigations. In other words, prosecutors feared that the Florida Supreme Court would react to an obvious violation of individual privacy rights by creating a standard that would have made it even harder to violate individual privacy rights in the future.

The simple reality of the case continues to be that, while operations like this surely have racked up plenty of quick and quiet guilty pleas in the past, Kraft fought back. In doing so, he exposed a corrupt, unconstitutional practice that was tantamount to spying on private citizens without probable cause to believe any crime was being committed.

Basically, they messed with the wrong guy. Kraft’s defense lawyers brought the underhanded tactics to light, and prosecutors decided to cut bait in recognition of the reality that the bigger boat they needed was nowhere to be found.

57 responses to “Misdemeanor charge dropped against Robert Kraft

  1. Kraft was able to get out of this because he had the money, but this is the right decision and it sounds like the helped other people get out of this. The police didn’t have proper warrants, this was never “human trafficking” and there’s a lawsuit from people that were getting legit massages.

    I don’t care if two consenting adults exchange money for sex.

  2. Must be nice to have to best lawyers to nitpick every single little angle of the case. Of course Kraft got off

  3. Krafty must have paid a boatload of money to whoever to clear his name, if this was average Joe he would be behind bars waiting to be sentence 3-5 yrs in prison

  4. “The law is so corrupt in this country. Those with money are the only ones allowed to break it.”

    It is the enforcement that is corrupt. Kraft wasn’t “allowed” to break the law any more than someone “can break the law” in their own home without police just breaking down the door to check if they’re behaving.

  5. browns64 says:
    September 24, 2020 at 2:10 pm
    Krafty must have paid a boatload of money to whoever to clear his name, if this was average Joe he would be behind bars waiting to be sentence 3-5 yrs in prison

    ____________

    For a misdemeanor? I don’t think any of the other average Joe’s seen a day. There was quite a large group being charged. The fine was less than a couple hours legal fees.

  6. Sure rich as advantages but in this case he never should have been charged in the first place and they knew it.

  7. “if this was average Joe he would be behind bars waiting to be sentence 3-5 yrs in prison”

    For 2 misdemeanors? Nope, no one would spend time in prison for that.

    You may hate Kraft but in general people never go to jail for misdemeanors, they usually get community service and a fine.

    People need to stop acting like he committed murder or some heinous crime.

  8. tigershark0052 says:
    September 24, 2020 at 2:33 pm
    The law is so corrupt in this country. Those with money are the only ones allowed to break it.

    Put yourself in Kraft’s shoes. If you were ever caught doing something embarrassing, would you rather pay a quick fine, log a few community service and be done with it? Or have your name plastered all over the evening news for your mom, neighbours, and coworkers to read?

  9. __________________________________

    In other words, prosecutors feared that the Florida Supreme Court would react to an obvious violation of individual privacy rights by creating a standard that would have made it even harder to violate individual privacy rights in the future.

    The simple reality of the case continues to be that, while operations like this surely have racked up plenty of quick and quiet guilty pleas in the past, Kraft fought back. In doing so, he exposed a corrupt, unconstitutional practice that was tantamount to spying on private citizens without probable cause to believe any crime was being committed.

    Basically, they messed with the wrong guy. Kraft’s defense lawyers brought the underhanded tactics to light, and prosecutors decided to cut bait in recognition of the reality that the bigger boat they needed was nowhere to be found.

    _______________________________________________________

    Rights are great when you can afford to enforce them. Thankfully for Robert and 30+ other people who were indicted, he can. Destroying the tapes is the next logical step. Before someone in the evidence room decides to put their kid through college with something that shouldn’t exist in the first place.

  10. At a minimum he deserved community service and a fine. High powered lawyers and a truck load of cash rarely loses!

  11. annapterp says:
    Sure rich as advantages but in this case he never should have been charged in the first place and they knew it.
    ==

    Bob Kraft got off because of shoddy police work that skirted the law, meaning the case wouldn’t have held up in court. They had no choice but to drop the charges to a misdemeanor — one someone with Kraft’s status and resources was sure to beat.
    Legally, Kraft walked and rightly so. That doesn’t mean he isn’t guilty of the more serious charges. They had the evidence, they just obtained it the wrong way.
    The vast majority of people using semantics to defend Kraft are Patriots fans who think their golden boys can’t and don’t ever do anything wrong. For those claiming it was just “misdemeanors, that’s the point. Someone without his status and resources would never have gotten the charges dropped to misdemeanors in the first place.

  12. Really bad example! Maybe the NFL will give the Patriots an extra draft pick due to the news as well? NFL will never gain respectability with the Me too movement by letting an owner get away with this.

  13. “Put yourself in Kraft’s shoes.”

    Think he wears Gucci or Ferragamo? Maybe something so expensive we’ve never heard of it.

  14. It says a lot about people when they get upset about the “rich guy” rather than law enforcement’s disregard for the rules. The benefit of being rich was that he could afford some of the best lawyers and had the patience and money to wait the process out to its completion, and not that he paid for any special treatment. Prosecutors rely on the vast majority of people in Kraft’s situation– even if they’re 100% innocent– to just plead guilty because it’s easier and cheaper for everyone.

    Good for Kraft for exposing the corrupt nature of the investigatory work. I’d love to see a civil suit going after some of the elected officials in FL who grandstanded at the start of this thing throwing out terms like “human trafficking,” etc.

  15. Law enforcement overreached their authority here. Kraft had the money to fight it where most people would take a misdemeanor and a wrist slap. Destroy the video(s?) and let’s all move on with our lives.

  16. So, are they going to overturn all the others who have been prosecuted by these same means in the past? My guess would be no.

  17. I’m not saying Kraft is an innocent victim here. Law enforcement made the big reach when they started all of this with the Human Trafficing angle. It was all downhill after that.

  18. Good for him.
    BTW – the “crime” had a penalty weaker than driving without a license.
    Disgruntled Dolphins fans out to settle a score, I’ll bet.

  19. It’s always such a pleasure to read PFT and see so many commenters who clearly can’t be bothered to read beyond the headline before popping off. /sarcasm

    Nobody needed to be paid off here, and Kraft didn’t get the charges dropped because of a technicality. This police force violated the court order they received regarding surveillance of the Orchids of Asia business, AND they pulled over cars without any probable cause for the stop.

    We all have constitutional rights in this country. I’m glad Kraft had the money to get high-powered lawyers involved. Otherwise this kind of illegal policing would continue and worsen. If you object to the court’s rulings in this case, maybe you would prefer to live somewhere that doesn’t provide Constitutional rights to its citizens.

  20. The rich are above the law and do whatever they want to. Meanwhile, the cops arrest some poor people for some BS offense and they do not have the big money lawyers to drag it out and make it go away so they end up in jail.

  21. Rich guy = Innocent

    Poor guy = Guilty

    Been this way since the dawn of mankind and I doubt it will ever change ” ITS A GREAT BIG CLUB AND YOU AND I AINT IN IT “

  22. Kraft may have done it BUT law enforcement still has to follow the rules when gathering evidence. They cant just do anything they want. With all this talk about violation of rights, what they did was a HUGE violation.

  23. browns64 says:
    September 24, 2020 at 2:10 pm
    Krafty must have paid a boatload of money to whoever to clear his name, if this was average Joe he would be behind bars waiting to be sentence 3-5 yrs in prison
    ———————————————————–
    You might want to brush up on your law…

  24. Funny how the commenters are more upset with Kraft for “getting away with a happy ending” than the government for violating its citizens constitutional rights.

  25. Fair enough, but given that players have been suspended by the league in the past despite not being convicted of any crimes, I think that Kraft should still be wrapped on the knuckles by the league for the negative attention.

  26. The vast majority of prisoners come from poor families. And it’s not just that they’re bad guys. I wonder if a public defender could have gotten the charges dismissed. Geez what a waste of taxpayer money. Who exactly did Robert Kraft hurt, anyway? Hey, I’m happy to pay my taxes, but I’d rather they go to schools or healthcare, than these illegal scams. We paid for that, you know. Look at your pay stub.

  27. So Human Trafficing is okay for RK? What a dirt bag. Brady Should have left years ago vs being tainted by the no integrity owner and head coach.

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