“Major hurricane” heading for Louisiana

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The Saints are scheduled to host the Chargers on Monday night at the Superdome. Fifteen years after Katrina, another hurricane is heading toward Louisiana.

Hurricane Delta (they ran out of alphabet this year, so they’re now using Greek letters) has gathered sufficient power to be regarded as a “major hurricane,” and it’s expected to hit Louisiana later this week and this weekend.

According to the National Weather Service, Delta currently churns over the Gulf of Mexico, with a likely curve to the north later in the week. This could lead to “some significant” impacts across “portions of southeast Louisiana,” which includes New Orleans.

It’s still too early to know what will happen. It’s not too early to have concerns about how things will play out. Louisiana’s unique geography makes it susceptible to far worse consequences of a direct hit than other American states, as illustrated by the devastation wrought by Katrina in 2005.

28 responses to ““Major hurricane” heading for Louisiana

  1. This scenario could be just as scary as Katrina. That one went in east of New Orleans and this one is projected to go in just west of there. Being east of the center is usually far worse.

  2. Stay strong Louisiana. I pray for my family and friends living there. Looks like this is going to be a major one and New Orleans could be on the “dirty side”. Not good! Football comes second, stay safe y’all. Who Dat!

  3. I feel for Louisiana and the people there but how many times do hurricanes need to devastate that community before people move out or the local / federal government tries to do something to help prevent these catastrophic results? Is there literally nothing that can be done? Seriously asking….

  4. I know a lot of pipeline guys from Louisiana.

    I’ve been wishing them the best every other week
    for the past three months of this year.

    All that beer and bacon will kill ’em before a hurricane. 😉

  5. Why is it always Viking “fans” posting on Saints sites?
    How many Hurricanes have devastated Louisiana, vs. Texas, Florida, or the Outer Banks of North Carolina?
    Is Mikethevike posting on the Texans, Panthers Bucs jags and Dolphins sites?
    No

  6. mikethevike11 says:
    Is there literally nothing that can be done? Seriously asking….

    If you are seriously asking, the answer is that you don’t build a city in that location. Not trying to be insensitive, but that is the reality. Hypothetical: If your backyard had a creek running through it, you would not build your kids a swing set or sand box in the creek, right?

  7. A significant part of Katrina damage was due to levee failures. Levees had federal funding allocated for levee improvement, but state and local govt plundered and embezzled from it instead. Typical Louisiana politics,a tradition for many years, ala huey p “kingfish” long.

  8. mikethevike11 – it’s like a city was built in an active volcano and the volcano erupted in 2005. So it was deemed smart to rebuild the city on top of the still active volcano. Only a matter of time until erupts again, in a continuous cycle, forever.

    I say this as a Who Dat – lived in NOLA for 10 years. Love the city, but another Katrina and that probably “should” be it. No point wasting billions more dollars to watch it get destroyed again in the future.

  9. All the best to the hurricane prone areas. Just remember to not dish it out when we’re getting the snow and cold in the North.

  10. For the few people who suggest giving up on this iconic city, prolly live in a dull Midwest strip mall heaven of a town. Being here my whole life, and watching MY city wash away 15 years ago, was a trying time. We will persevere, its what we do. This city is SO MUCH more than the drunk tourist on Bourdon, I truly wish all could experience a fall weekday evening uptown garden district. WHODAT

  11. steaksandwichandsteaksandwich says:

    Sorry “Steak” but what does what team a poster follows have to do with a discussion on a Hurricane?

    So Saints “Fans” hold a monopoly on the concern for a city and it’s inhabitants?

    I don’t at all follow your logic or complaint….

  12. @mikethevike, We can take climate change more seriously for one. We have always had fires, tornadoes, droughts, and hurricanes, but the ferocity and frequency are unprecedented in our recorded time. There is a correlation and educated people who study science have proved this. We can’t stop Mother Nature, but we can stop making it worse for the future. Bless those in the path of the hurricanes. Please evacuate safely

  13. “I feel for Louisiana and the people there but how many times do hurricanes need to devastate that community before people move out or the local / federal government tries to do something to help prevent these catastrophic results? Is there literally nothing that can be done? Seriously asking….”

    Do you also ask why do they rebuild houses out west after every wild fire burns down thousands of homes? Why do they rebuild homes in the Midwest after tornados also destroy thousands of homes? Point being there are natural disasters that cover pretty much the entire country on a yearly basis. So, being you have all the answers where would you like all of these people to move? Minnesota? No thanks!

  14. @steaksandwichandsteaksandwich:
    THanks for your concern and compassion.
    THen why arent you posting about Miami and NYC, 2 cities threatened by their low lying geography.
    Too bad you dont know about New Orleans.
    How much of New Orleans is below sea level? 50%
    the French Explorers built the original city on the 50% above sea level.
    THe unscrupulous developers in the later centuries built in the below sea level areas.

  15. I recall two other “major” hurricanes that were forecasted over the last two months for Lousiana. They came and went without much fanfare. I think everything nowadays is considered “major.”

  16. When it comes to climate science… the trump administration
    has their heads buried deep in sand.

  17. 11thEarlofProg

    took 28 days for my sister to have power resotred to her home in an upper middle class sub of Lake Charles, people in Cameron parish are experiencing rolling blackouts because the power is remote by generators with a date to stable restore still 3 weeks away. WAKE UP

  18. ahzroc says:

    _______

    First off, yes I post on STORIES (not sites) about anything I feel I have an opinion on, just yesterday morning I asked why the hell Bill O’Brian still had a job. And at the time I posted about the hurricane, this was the top story on PFT. Second, considering this story is specifically about Louisiana, I didn’t bring other areas into it. Third, are you implying I’m not actually a Vikings fan with your “quotes”? Fourth, sensitive much? Fifth, I didn’t actually bring the Aints into the subject, just the community they reside in.

    To everyone else, good points. Maybe a little harsh but you guys make good points.

  19. mikethevike11 says:
    Is there literally nothing that can be done? Seriously asking….

    If you are seriously asking, the answer is that you don’t build a city in that location. Not trying to be insensitive, but that is the reality. Hypothetical: If your backyard had a creek running through it, you would not build your kids a swing set or sand box in the creek, right?

    ———————————————————————————–

    Gosh, it’s almost like cities all around this world spring up near large bodies of water for some inconceivable reason!

  20. kyzmyn2 says:
    October 6, 2020 at 12:49 pm
    A significant part of Katrina damage was due to levee failures. Levees had federal funding allocated for levee improvement, but state and local govt plundered and embezzled from it instead. Typical Louisiana politics,a tradition for many years, ala huey p “kingfish” long.
    ____________________________________________

    Levees are built and maintained by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It’s a federal thing, not a local thing (unless you count the guy who sent all the pump operators home).

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