Why did Seahawks make their interest in Antonio Brown known?

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As the date for the potential return of Antonio Brown approached, we floated this idea on PFT Live: Would one team’s interest in Brown prompt other teams to get involved?

That’s quite possibly what happened, with Seattle’s acknowledged interest in Brown prompting Tampa Bay to swoop in and close the deal.

That leads to a broader question. Why did the Seahawks acknowledge interest in Brown? Surely they knew that this could prompt other contenders, especially in the NFC, to get involved. Surely they knew that Tom Brady was still pushing for the Bucs to sign Brown.

So why do it? Here’s a theory. Or maybe it’s technically a hypothesis. Regardless, what if the powers-that-be in Seattle have decided that Brown hasn’t changed, that he’ll be a problem, and that he’ll potential derail the next team with which he signs?

It’s possibly a Trojan Horse-style concept, a next-level effort by the Seahawks to get the Buccaneers to disrupt team chemistry with a guy who will potentially throw everything out of whack.

Ultimately, the distinction is binary. The Seahawks either recklessly invited a competitor to swoop in, or they did it deliberately. Given that the Seahawks have had a winning record every year since 2012, it could be safe to say that this was no accident. If so, time will tell whether the calculated effort to plant a virus in a Tampa Bay team that could be the most complete in the NFC helps the Seahawks clear out a team that could keep Pete Carroll, Russell Wilson and company from getting back to the Super Bowl.

26 responses to “Why did Seahawks make their interest in Antonio Brown known?

  1. As good as Brown was, how good would he be 1.5 seasons removed from his last game in Dec 2018. Thats almost 2 years ago. (Ok, he played 1 game with the Patriots, but still…).
    With a full off season I think he could be ok, but would have declined.

  2. Most of the Seahawk fan boards were about 90 – 10% against the signing, so I think everyone except Russell are happy today. What we really need is a DE that can get to the QB if any team should have one available.

  3. This three dimensional chess theory is nothing but click bait for this “story”. As a Hawk fan I’m damn glad he went elsewhere, DK and Lockette don’t need that drama. Go Hawks!

  4. I believe they truly wanted him. Signing Josh Gordon tells me they’ll sign anyone if they think it would give them a chance to win. It’s likely AB wanted to play with Brady instead of Wilson simply because he has faith that Brady won’t throw an INT at the end and lose the Super Bowl.

  5. That wouldn’t be next level. It would be an acknowledgement by Seattle brass that they aren’t good enough to beat Tampa and their only hope is if the Bucs implode.

    Somehow I don’t think that’s what happened.

  6. I’d say it’s more that they were appealing to his emotional side that he’s shown over the past few years than that they were making some ingenious scheme to manipulate a contending team. They may have viewed it as a win win, they either trigger another team into signing a potential malcontent or their public appeals get a potential star to join them, confident that he’ll worst case be a josh gordon situation where he just ends up not playing but not destroying team chemistry.

  7. If Brown messes up in Tampa he’s immediately bounced. I just don’t see Brady in that locker room allowing a player to be a major distraction.

  8. Most of the Seahawk fan boards were about 90 – 10% against the signing, so I think everyone except Russell are happy today. What we really need is a DE that can get to the QB if any team should have one available.
    ————————————
    Bills and Hawks should be calling for Melvin Ingram.

  9. Good question. I bet their top two receivers paid attention to this story as it unfolded. I’m relieved he signed elsewhere. Now we get to watch the impending train wreck from a safe distance. Go Hawks!

  10. Seattle is the 14th largest NFL market, and perhaps listens to fans too much? The “12’s” are almost considered a player — beast-quake, 2nd loudest stadium, 142 consecutive sellouts, etc…

  11. Feigning interest would surely help raise the price the opposing team ends up paying. However, I believe the interest was genuine and they simply misjudged interest by Tamps Bay. But then again…….

  12. I have a slightly different theory. I do agree the Seahawks leaked this to get another team to sign Brown. I think however they did it to pacify Russell Wilson. Wilson clearly wanted the Seahawks to sign Brown. I don’t think the Seahawks had any intention of signing Brown. I think they had to act like they were signing Brown to keep Wilson happy. By leaking it they could hopefully get another team to step up. If it happens to be an NFC contender, and there is subtraction by addition, so much the better.

  13. His return date arrived. Marketable. And RW definitely felt AB would keep them without losses. Anyways, betting tip for this weekend — take the Cardinals.

  14. Holy conspiracy theory. Or, they wanted to show interest and Brown selected the Bucs instead? Let’s move one

  15. How does that leave Lockett and Metcalf feeling, since the Hawks basically were saying we don’t think our current WR group is good enough?

  16. Seattle’s front office should get all the credit on players being brought in. Well written article and could be spot on, only time will tell.

  17. WantCoffee99 says:

    October 23, 2020 at 10:45 pm

    Good question. I bet their top two receivers paid attention to this story as it unfolded. I’m relieved he signed elsewhere. Now we get to watch the impending train wreck from a safe distance. Go Hawks!

    ——–
    I’d bet Evans and Godwin arent affected as theyve both been banged up already and Godwin has already missed time. Also Brown isnt coming in and taking their playing time completely. If anything I’d be more worried what Seahawks wr are thinking

  18. My sense is Seattle didn’t realize there was genuine interest from another desirable landing spot.

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