Former Washington employees want NFL to make investigation findings public

NFL-Dallas Cowboys at Washington Redskins
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As the NFL closes in on closing the investigation involving years of alleged and/or actual misconduct within the Washington Football Team, multiple former employees want to be sure that the matter isn’t swept under the rug.

Via the Washington Post, two former employees sent a letter to Commissioner Roger Goodell on Thursday demanding that the results of the investigation be made public.

The league could try to claim that details won’t be released due to employee privacy reasons. However, as noted by the Post, the former employees explained that investigators told them that the final report would omit names and other identifying information. The letter also explained that any names appearing in the report can be redacted.

“We shared our experiences, often at great emotional cost, taking you at your word that the investigation would be conducted transparently and in good faith, and that the NFL would take appropriate steps in response,” the letter from the former employees states, per the Post. “But there cannot be accountability without transparency.”

NFL spokesperson Brian McCarthy declined comment on the demand for transparency, and he said that the report has not yet been received from attorney Beth Wilkinson.

The NFL has disclosed information regarding other controversies, from the New Orleans bounty scandal to the Dolphins’ bullying controversy to #Deflategate to the question of whether the NFL had the Ray Race in-elevator video before it was procured by TMZ.com.

NFL franchises, while owned privately (except for the Packers), have become public trusts — especially in places where the team’s stadium has been funded partially if not fully by taxpayer money. In matters like this, which have great significance to the team, the league, and society at large, it’s impossible to justify handling the allegations and the finds secrecy.

17 responses to “Former Washington employees want NFL to make investigation findings public

  1. “NFL franchises, while owned privately (except for the Packers), have become public trusts — especially in places where the team’s stadium has been funded partially if not fully by taxpayer money.”
    ———————

    Wow, that’s a BIG stretch.

    NFL teams pays millions of dollars in leases to use public funded stadiums, which still means they’re a private business. Just because I drive on public-funded roads doesn’t make me a government employee.

  2. For better or worse (worse), this is simply the owners protecting themselves for future slimy slip-ups that are and will be made public.

  3. Hilarious – Its none of anyones business if you arent involved. And if you are involved you will know the findings or have agreed to a settlement. In which case you agree to the terms in exchange for money.

    Why would anyone not involved need to be privy to info? This is the problem with today’s world. Too many people in other peoples busniness.

  4. Oh yea… I want all of my previous employers’ mistreatment of me and all of my colleagues exposed to public scrutiny too. I might be able to achieve that via lawsuit, but that’s unlikely. Same goes for this try too.

  5. The more that comes out, the more it looks like a coordinated effort to force the sale…

    I’m no fan of Dan snyder, but it’s hard not to take his side. It looks like whomever coordinated this ruined the credible victims stories. Which, imo, doesn’t justify it, but it should have been executed better. That’s all I’m saying.

    I feel for them, but at the same time I can’t help but see the forest as well as the trees. That there’s dirty pool going on, and these minority owners should be under investigation, they obviously didn’t care about the victims, they cared about selling shares of a team. Or disdain for someone else.

    That’s garbage

  6. The NFL has disclosed information regarding other controversies, from the New Orleans bounty scandal to the Dolphins’ bullying controversy to #Deflategate to the question of whether the NFL had the Ray Race in-elevator video before it was procured by TMZ.com.
    ____________________________________________________________________________________________

    Given the above, what we learned is if the NFL makes things public the information is either slanted (Dolphins) or flat made-up (Deflategate).

  7. Would making the findings public, set a precedent for all future NFL investigations?

  8. If any actions are taken those will be public. Other than that it is a privately owned business and the findings are none of our or your business.

  9. Corporations make settlements every year. Sometimes for the sole reason to keep their name out of negative light even if said information is completly false. Nobody needs to be involved in the info.

  10. Roger and the NFL should get out of the “investigations” business. These situations are far too complex and there are far too many conflicts of interest involved. Not to mention the fact that they’ve proven themselves to be wholly inept with stuff like this in the past.

    Or (because that will never happen), and similar to situations with player “misconduct” – in quotes because Roger likes to punish players even if the law has bowed out, the NFL needs to establish clear rules regarding how TEAM misconduct will be handled.

    Roger shouldn’t be making anything up as he goes along, or bending over backwards to arrive at a predetermined outcome (i.e. Deflategate). There’s also the question of what power the NFL head office actually has against owners – which we can all be pretty certain is none.

    Did the NFL safeguard anyone’s privacy during Deflategate? No. So why is this different?

  11. Based on what we know of Bezos’s interest in buying the WFT, anything reported by the Washington Post should be taken with a grain of salt

  12. The line that there can’t be accountability without transparency is transparent nonsense. WFT can be punished in any number of ways without the details being made public. Most companies decline to comment on employee disciplinary matters for good reasons.

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