Will Aaron Rodgers stay away from offseason workouts? (probably not)

NFL: MAY 31 Packers OTA
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As previously explained, it will be difficult for the NFL Players Association to persuade all players to stay away from voluntary offseason workouts. There’s one premiere player whose position on the matter will be very interesting to follow.

Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers, the defending NFL MVP, has multiple reasons to ignore the union’s recommendation.

First, he has a $500,000 workout bonus. And while it’s easy for an outsider to shrug at that because Rodgers has average annual compensation of $33.5 million, $500,000 is still a lost of money. Given that players will otherwise look for ways to stay in shape and/or to hone their craft and/or to get comfortable with their teammates, the formal offseason program gives them a way to do it.

Second, if Rodgers doesn’t show up and backup quarterback Jordan Love does, Love will get all the first-team reps in the offseason program. That will help Love be better prepared to take over, and it could take the team more willing to flip the switch in 2022. (No, Rodgers shouldn’t worry about Jordan Love. Yes, Rodgers likely still doesn’t want to give Love any chances to show that he’s ready to take over.)

Third, Rodgers isn’t particularly pleased with the union. He gave up his spot as the Packers’ NFLPA representative because he disagreed with the efforts of union leadership to force through the new CBA in 2020. Rodgers, put simply, may not be inclined to go along with anything that the NFLPA wants.

We’ll have more to say tonight and beyond about the various dynamics that apply to the first effort at concerted union action since the failed strike of 1987. There are plenty of layers and levels and issues and dynamics to consider.

Ultimately, the boycott may collapse. If it does, the union will be in the same place it would have been if it hadn’t tried to stage a boycott. So why not give it a try?

16 responses to “Will Aaron Rodgers stay away from offseason workouts? (probably not)

  1. NFLPA, yet another entity for Rodgers to hold a grudge against for some small or imaginary slight

  2. Why not try the boycott? Because you showed a weakness to your opponent. If they knew it would be futile they should have kept that card down instead of showing it. Lots of players won’t stay away because unlike Rodgers most veterans across the league are worried about their starting spot this year, not next.

  3. “Ultimately, the boycott may collapse. If it does, the union will be in the same place it would have been if it hadn’t tried to stage a boycott. So why not give it a try?”

    Because it shows the ownership the membership doesn’t listen to union leadership. Because it shows everyone watching that the union doesn’t care about the opportunity for it’s membership to improve their standing on their team.

  4. The NFLPA might the one of the worst unions ever. So tell the vets to stay away while the rookies and younger players show-up get all the reps then management decides the younger and much cheaper player is the better option. The vet gets cut at the start of camp and for few they will be lucky to get a league minimum with a crappy team the others are career enders. Most coaches and GM would find this very favorable to see what the rookies and younger players can do.

  5. “500,000 is a lost of money.”

    Does anyone do a second draft? Just mash it into your phone and hit publish?

  6. It sounds like Rodgers can p*** off the union AND the Packers in one swoop. I say do it!

  7. The Packers have 16 players tied to workout bonuses and the union is crazy to expect them, or any player for that matter, to forgo that money.
    It’s always been simple and smart business between the players and the organization to ensure voluntary compliance.

    Also, I think it’s quite strange for the Seahawks and Broncos to unilaterally decide a course of action for a handful of players who won’t even be a part of their team for another three or four weeks.
    Players who’re probably pretty eager to get an early hands on experience of team concepts and display their athletic talent and work ethic before they’re lost in the shuffle of training camp.

  8. Jordan Love is the second string quarterback as Tim Boyle (who Love couldn’t beat out for the back-up position) is now in Detroit. This will give Gutekunst a chance to once again move up in the first round and select a back-up to Jordan Love. I think it helps Gutekunst sleep better at night knowing a first round selection is sitting on the bench.

  9. Rodgers showed the Packers how good he could be when Farve skipped “voluntary” OTA’s. He doesn’t ever forget anything, I am sure he won’t forget that. I still wonder, that 3rd and goal from the 8, if he runs, he had room. I promise, if Green Bay is at the 2, they’re going for it. Just a random thought.

  10. Why the heck is the NFLPA fighting this fight? There are so many more important battles to fight. I hope Rodgers shows for the workouts.

  11. I still wonder, that 3rd and goal from the 8, if he runs, he had room. I promise, if Green Bay is at the 2, they’re going for it. Just a random thought.
    —–
    Agreed. Often wonder if maybe he was told it was 4 down territory then MLF changed his mind? Or he just screwed up. It happens.

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