Vikings players strike balance to launch partial boycott of offseason workouts

NFL: NOV 03 Vikings at Chiefs
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Some teams have issued statements indicating that all players will skip offseason workouts. Others have issued statements that “many” won’t be there.

The Vikings are among the some that said “many.” Defensive end Stephen Weatherly explained the decision to Chris Tomasson of the St. Paul Pioneer Press.

“When it came down to it, this was the best decision we could come up with considering everyone on the team,” Weatherly said. “Everyone has different factors they’ve got to weigh. This was the most uniform statement we had to come up with.”

The Vikings had to balance the interests of players who could skip the workouts without losing money, or without infringing upon their ability to recover from injuries.

“We wanted to keep an option for guys who had workout bonuses and guys who were injured and have to go to the facility,” Weatherly explained. “We didn’t want guys who had workout bonuses to have to choose between money to provide for their family or standing in solidarity or guys choosing between going in for some of the best treatment available or standing in solidarity. We don’t want to put people in that bind.”

Per Tomasson, the Vikings have 10 players with workout bonuses, including linebacker Eric Kendricks, defensive end Danielle Hunter, linebacker Anthony Barr, running back Dalvin Cook, and receiver Adam Thielen.

7 responses to “Vikings players strike balance to launch partial boycott of offseason workouts

  1. We’re really busy where I work. I wonder if I asked all the workers to volunteer to come in on Saturday and Sunday without pay, how many would show up. Do any of you guys out there volunteer to work for free on your days off? I mean, there’s always something you can do to get better at your job, right? You’d be helping the company. Helping the “team”. Even though the owner of the company has a lot more money than you do, you’ll work on your days off to help him out, right?

  2. Players of yesteryear came to voluntary workouts because they strived for greatness. Certainly tougher to respect players of today work ethic compared to those of years past.

  3. The “business decision” goes both ways. If businesses (teams) want their employees (players) to show up, they can decide to pay them for their time. I only work on the clock.

  4. mrhockey89 says:
    April 20, 2021 at 12:33 am
    Players of yesteryear came to voluntary workouts because they strived for greatness. Certainly tougher to respect players of today work ethic compared to those of years past.

    ———————–

    Lol…”Players of yesteryear” didn’t used to have the same approach to maintaining their bodies either…some players smoked in the locker room or came to practice still drunk from the night before…they spent the offseason getting away from football and used training camp to get back in game shape…most weren’t working out year round like today’s athletes…the players nowadays don’t have a true “offseason”…it’s literally year round training…I have no problem with players skipping VOLUNTARY workouts…

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