MLB, union sued for moving All-Star Game

Cincinnati Reds v Colorado Rockies
Getty Images

In a development that could cause the NFL and other sports leagues to expand the factors to be considered when potentially moving major events for political reasons, a group called the “Job Creators Network” has sued Major League Baseball and its union for relocating the July All-Star Game.

Baseball stripped the game from Georgia following the passage of a controversial voting-rights law.

The lawsuit, filed in New York City, seeks $100 million in compensatory damages and $1 billion in punitive damages. The Job Creators Network, which describes itself as a “nonpartisan organization whose mission is to educate employers and employees of Main Street America, in order to protect the 85 million people who depend on the success of small businesses,” claims that it “had to divert resources to address the grave harm to its Atlanta-area members” and “personnel from its fundraising efforts resulting in lower receipts.”

It could be a challenge for the Job Creators Network to prove that it has legal standing to sue, that the MLB and/or its union had some legal duty specifically to the Job Creators Network, that the duty was violated in some way, and that actual financial damages were suffered. Without those things, the lawsuit won’t last very long in court.

Without those things, the lawsuit may be nothing more than a publicity stunt, aimed at creating a headline around which those who have criticized baseball for its decision can rally, since the mere existence of a lawsuit could be interpreted by some as an indication that the lawsuit has merit.

Even if it doesn’t.

26 responses to “MLB, union sued for moving All-Star Game

  1. To hurt the little people whose livelihood depends on a sporting event
    because of unfounded political objections to a duly passed State law
    is criminal. MLB should have to financially reward these people who were
    damaged due to MLB’s political bias.

  2. The little people and job creators of Denver want these idiots to take a long walk on a short pier.

  3. I hope MLB has to pay millions. Sports leagues need to stay out o politics

  4. We need to keep politics out of sports!! I hope MLB and the Union accountable for political bias at the very least. Also why is this on a football forum?

  5. Welcome to free market capitalism! It’s ironic that those upset with MLB’s decision are more likely to be those who complain about government intervention in business, but are totally ok with people running to the (government institution) courts when things happen that they don’t like.

    BTW, “Get Woke, Go Broke” has never happened, and likely won’t. You’re fooling yourself (on both sides) if you think companies are making these decisions for any other reason that they’ve calculated that it’s better for their bottom line.

  6. Those that don’t understand politics has been in sports for a long long time have to be the most fragile people on the planet. Go Woke, Go Broke? Lol, wow. Sorry your Safe Space isn’t what you thought it was.

  7. It’s great how you keep calling it a controversial voting law. It’s no more controversial than proving who you are to get a driver’s license, or to buy a plane ticket or go through TSA/board a plane. The large majority of eligible voters have ID.

  8. Sports is a business and businesses mix with politics every day. How do you think stadiums get funded? If you dont think sports and politics don’t mix, then you are watching a children’s game; not professional sports.

  9. What a bunch of hacks. If you haven’t figured out the intersection of business and politics by now, you never will. The same morons that accurately say the first amendment doesn’t protect you from private businesses are condemning a private business decision — which I think we all know is contractually valid. Pick a side — but not both.

  10. Please explain how it is controversial to show your id? If you do not show your id a person could vote numerous times correct?

  11. Purely an attempt at a money grab by this organization. Georgia residents should be relieved that there is one less MLB game that they will have to endure!

  12. There is ZERO question as to the merit of this lawsuit. MLB messed up big time and now they’ll be held accountable.

  13. I also hope they win.

    And get a judgement of one dollar.

    But they’re not going to win. Kiss that dollar goodbye.

  14. can’t believe the contract just lets them walk with no penalties…if the state allowed that they get what they deserve…

  15. The fact that a lawyer could file such a thing is fascinating.
    It has been a long time, but I thought standing was covered in the first half of 1L.

    It is a pretty simple concept and clearly lacking here. A random group of people who are upset cannot litigate a matter. They would have to show some personal connection or perhaps a class.

    The stadium vendors could potentially have standing and I’m sure others could, but this group surely doesn’t.

    Beyond that, it seems like NY was chosen as the venue because the group did not want to pay for a Georgia lawyer.

    It seems far more likely that a Georgia judge is going to rule against MLB than a NY judge.

  16. The state of Georgia used the democratic process properly and passed legislation. Whether you approve or disapprove of the outcome is irrelevant. This is the way a democracy is supposed to work. MLB should never have taken away the All Star Game!

  17. The fact that people defends a law that takes rights away from humans beings just because it goes against their political views just shows how terrible divided this country is. It should be people against politicians, not people vs people because politicians told them.

  18. So any “group” can sue any company for whatever they make up as an issue?
    I hope that lawsuit gets tossed.
    You can’t shake down businesses.

  19. roughingthepasser says:
    June 2, 2021 at 11:00 am

    So any “group” can sue any company for whatever they make up as an issue?
    _______________________

    No. But when companies sign contracts and then tear them up, there can be legal consequences. This may just be the first of many.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.