NCAA opens the NIL floodgates

Senate Holds Hearing On NCAA Athlete NIL Rights
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It’s time to make some money, kids.

The NCAA, caught between a Congress that has yet to create national name, image, and likeness standards and a Supreme Court that has made abundantly clear that any NCAA-imposed limits violate antitrust laws, finally has allowed student-athletes to capitalize on their fame.

The NIL floodgates are indeed open.

“This is an important day for college athletes since they all are now able to take advantage of name, image and likeness opportunities,” NCAA president Mark Emmert said in a statement, via ESPN.com. “With the variety of state laws adopted across the country, we will continue to work with Congress to develop a solution that will provide clarity on a national level. The current environment — both legal and legislative — prevents us from providing a more permanent solution and the level of detail student-athletes deserve.”

In other words, the NCAA can’t enact broad, sweeping rules that restrict in any way the concept of free enterprise that applies to any other 18-to-21-year-old who becomes a celebrity. Actors can make as much as they want from their fame. Musicians can make as much as they want from their fame. People who have fame for no apparent reason cam make as much money as they want from their fame.

Now, athletes can. And no one should limit it. If Congress acts, the NCAA surely will be lobbying aggressively to get Congress to craft the rules the NCAA wants but no longer can impose on its own. It should be open. It should be free. Every college athlete, no matter the gender and no matter the sport, should be allowed to make as much money as he or she can or wants.

Here’s hoping the floodgates remain open. When it comes to fair treatment of athletes, it’s hardly the end. But it’s definitely a good beginning.

31 responses to “NCAA opens the NIL floodgates

  1. Maybe schools should start doing away with scholarships, giving them jobs, free tutoring room and board.

  2. Good deal – the athletes will have to report that as income on their FAFSA. That should free up aid for other students whose sole purpose is to get an affordable, quality education.

  3. The law of unintended consequences will surely rear it’s head in this whole thing. We shall see.

  4. Or maybe draft straight out of high school and the nfl have a minor or developmental league

  5. I hope schools add language to scholarship of no extra income can be made from sport.
    Let those who want $ to go form their own league.

  6. Gee, and I always thought that going to college was all about getting an education.
    How about we just stop giving athletes scholarships and make them take out loans to pay for their college tuition as most other kids have to do.
    If they want to play sports, have at it, just like they did in high school.
    If the NFL wants to use college age kids as farm hands, let them establish a Minor League NFL system as baseball has and develop all their own players. That way we’ll see the truth, that most athletes want no part of college, they are only there to try to get to the professional level.
    It’s ridiculous to pretend that these star college players give a hoot about an education. All they care about is signing a multi-million dollar contract in the NFL.
    Mind you, I want to see them get paid. But I don’t want them in college if they are, I want them playing in an NFL sponsored farm league. That way colleges could still have football teams made up of kids who otherwise would have no chance to make the team or play, and they’d be doing it simply because they love the sport.

  7. This should free up scholarship money for academics rather than sports. Which is the way it should be. Glad to see it.

  8. Yup – NCAA should just stop giving scholarships to athletes now. Let them pay for their education like non-athletes.

  9. It’s long overdue this system was broken. But pro football will ultimately pay the price, and the fault is their own.

  10. irishdude79 says:
    June 30, 2021 at 8:25 pm

    “Maybe schools should start doing away with scholarships, giving them jobs, free tutoring room and board.”

    No one forces schools to do this. They only do it because they believe it will attract players that will help the school win.

  11. Oh good. The Bama and USC starters get to collect millions, Everyone else can eat cake…

  12. Everyone’s hailing this as some revolution of fairness and positivity, but there are a lot of unanswered questions here.

    Namely, won’t this create an even bigger gap between the Haves and Have-Nots in college athletics? I have to imagine that the OSUs and Clemsons of the world will be lining up the NIL deals for star recruits, meanwhile Indiana and Kentucky and the like will lose even more recruits to the big boys.

    Not to say anything about the impact that paying players and/or classifying them as employees may ultimately have on nonrev/women’s sports (ie every other sport besides football and basketball). Hopefully this isn’t a death knell for smaller sports and programs.

  13. That first comment is silly. Most college students on scholarship can still get a job….except athletes? That was stupid. So, the suggestion to now take away their scholarships makes no sense. The college is still making millions off of their ahtletic performances. You’re upset because they make money off of their fame? Ridiculous. Scholarships STILL pale in comparison to what the colleges make off the athletes.

  14. irishdude79 says:
    June 30, 2021 at 8:25 pm
    Maybe schools should start doing away with scholarships, giving them jobs, free tutoring room and board.
    ——–
    In other words you’re so hurt that athletes can now capitalized off their name that you want to do something as short sighted as to take away scholarships from them. Ok. Good do that. Then athletes won’t be bound by ANY NCAA rules. They can transfer to another school whenever they want. I mean the school isn’t providing them anything at all right? Other schools can just pilfer another school’s best player then. It becomes a true open market. Your favorite university don’t want to offer a scholarship? I’m sure another university whose multi billion dollar revenue depends on getting the best athletes and winning would have no problem giving that athlete a scholarship and much much more.

  15. All of you saying this should free up money for academics are delusional. If you’ve never played a collegiate sport you have no idea the commitment that takes and also clearly don’t have an understanding of how much money athletics bring to the school. The scholarships remain and anybody making money on top of that good for them.

  16. Such an extremely small amount of these athletes will EVER sign a pro contract, so why can’t they make a few bucks while their NIL is actually wanted. I was an Olineman at a MAC School and never went pro, and you can bet my fat butt that I would’ve enjoyed doing an ad for a local restaurant or something else for a few extra bucks but I never had that opportunity.

    Let there be a free market!!! All of these comments I’ve read so far sound like you all work for the NCAA and are pissed that some 19 year old can make some money now.

  17. Yes, open up the floodgates of sleazy agents and grifters, as well as deep pocketed boosters. I do not want to read a virtue signaling article 5 years from now about how these 18 year olds are being exploited and screwed over by these type of people because the rules which have just been overturned were designed to prevent that. There are so many unintended negative consequences that people are blind to.

  18. “Good deal – the athletes will have to report that as income on their FAFSA. That should free up aid for other students whose sole purpose is to get an affordable, quality education.” ______ not so fast! ______________ Athletic scholarships come from a completely different pool of cash and have no “need” requirement.

  19. After a few years there will be major rules in place but in the mean time this will get real ugly real quick. So when a kid decides to blow off practice to go to a autograph signing can they be fined $20,000 per instance? Right now there is no rules in place that say they the schools can’t fine them any amount they want. Players will be jumping schools at an alarming rate every time they get fined or feel they were not given the respect and respect is money and only money.

  20. rickyfin says:
    July 1, 2021 at 8:58 am
    After a few years there will be major rules in place but in the mean time this will get real ugly real quick. So when a kid decides to blow off practice to go to a autograph signing can they be fined $20,000 per instance? Right now there is no rules in place that say they the schools can’t fine them any amount they want. Players will be jumping schools at an alarming rate every time they get fined or feel they were not given the respect and respect is money and only money
    ————
    Therr are plenty of rules already in place to ensure a kid shows up for practice. Including suspension and up to getting their scholarship pulled. You guys keep coming up with some of thr most absurd hypotheticals. Listen….athletes get paid all the time. You all are acting like this is something strange that’s never been done before. From minor leagues to the top levels of sports athletes have gotten paid.

  21. This only hurts the naive kids who think they will get rich playing a college sport. They will also open themselves to being taken advantage of or scammed by “agents”.

  22. How rich, that the NCAA expects us to believe they’d provide the “level of detail student-athletes deserve” IF ONLY they were able!!

  23. fastenyourseatbelts73 says:
    July 1, 2021 at 4:46 am
    Such an extremely small amount of these athletes will EVER sign a pro contract, so why can’t they make a few bucks while their NIL is actually wanted. I was an Olineman at a MAC School and never went pro, and you can bet my fat butt that I would’ve enjoyed doing an ad for a local restaurant or something else for a few extra bucks but I never had that opportunity.

    Let there be a free market!!! All of these comments I’ve read so far sound like you all work for the NCAA and are pissed that some 19 year old can make some money now.

    —————

    This is the best comment. There are obviously going to be some players who will have huge money opportunities, but the vast majority of them won’t.

    Whining that athletes are going to start skipping practice to do a paid autograph session? What? What a stupid hypothetical. Pro athletes don’t do that, why would college kids? If they skip practice they’ll get benched.

  24. Might this cause locker room divisiveness? I mean everybody knows the star running back’s name so he gets big $$$. How’s that going to make those lesser known O-line players feel?

  25. So now a student/athlete won’t be “bribed” to go to a certain college as they will just be told that an athlete can expect X amount of endorsement if they go to that school. These waters are really going to get muddy big time.

  26. I think this is a good thing, but I can’t quite get my head around what it will look like. Big football programs have huge rosters and limited scholarships – so who will get paid, and how much? I seriously doubt star players will earn “millions”. With so many players, how can a school afford that? And the percentage of college athletes who have careers in the pros is very small. I think it’s around 2%, and we all know that a “career” can last a couple of seasons for most.

    Maybe I’m wrong.

    As others have suggested, something that would have many benefits would be an NFL developmental league.

  27. fastenyourseatbelts73 says:
    July 1, 2021 at 4:46 am
    Such an extremely small amount of these athletes will EVER sign a pro contract, so why can’t they make a few bucks while their NIL is actually wanted. I was an Olineman at a MAC School and never went pro, and you can bet my fat butt that I would’ve enjoyed doing an ad for a local restaurant or something else for a few extra bucks but I never had that opportunity.

    Let there be a free market!!! All of these comments I’ve read so far sound like you all work for the NCAA and are pissed that some 19 year old can make some money now.

    ——————

    Nope – don’t work for the NCAA at all. I said let these kids make money! I also said that since they can now make money on their own with sponsorships, etc, they shouldn’t get athletic scholarships, room/board, etc, paid for by the school since they can now pay for it themselves.

  28. If it’s not worth it, then the NCAA just stop selling jerseys, player merch, and making deals selling players names in video games.

  29. So are they employees if the schools that”hire” them? Why are they even considered students anymore?

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