Report: Cameron Kinley can delay Navy commission, go to Bucs training camp

USA TODAY Sports

It appears cornerback Cameron Kinley will get his chance to make the Buccaneers roster in training camp this summer.

Lucas Tomlinson of FOX News reports that the Pentagon is set to announce that defense secretary Lloyd Austin will allow Kinley to attend camp with the Buccaneers. Kinley is a graduate of the United States Naval Academy and had been barred from delaying his commission to the Navy in order to pursue a professional football career in June.

A 2017 rule barring athletes from delaying their commissions was reversed in 2019 to allow for exemptions, but Kinley did not receive one while players graduating from other service academies were able to get them. The decision was met with confusion from Kinley and calls from many others to reverse course.

Kinley played 27 games in college and left school with 88 tackles, 3.5 tackles for loss, a sack, an interception, and a forced fumble. He signed with the Bucs after going undrafted and took part in portions of their offseason program.

19 responses to “Report: Cameron Kinley can delay Navy commission, go to Bucs training camp

  1. Kind of a no brainer. If the NAVY stopped him from playing, no intellegent decent player would go to the Academy thinking, I can kiss a pro career or a good part of it goodbye. No thanks, Army here I come.

  2. Bend the rules for one.
    Bend them for all.
    Just make 1 set of rules and stick with it.

  3. It’s good to know that he will eventually be used as a dispensable, warm body for his brute physicality in order to make a handful of powerful people more wealthy. And also, he’ll get to play in the NFL.

  4. This is a subject that I’ve had many decisions about.
    1. To say that the Academies will not be able to recruit if there is no NFL exemption is a joke. Does anyone think that Trevor Lawrence would have ever considered them?
    2. When you join the Academies you know your commitment. So should any any athlete get a sports exemption? What about the WNBA, MLB, NHL, MLS? I’m sure there is good players in those sports that could get a shot with one of the leagues.
    3. What about the person that graduates at the top of their class in Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, or any major? Should they be exempt so they can work for some civilian company?

    I lean towards you made a commitment, stick to it.

  5. Major Whiplash says:
    July 6, 2021 at 1:16 pm
    Kind of a no brainer. If the NAVY stopped him from playing, no intellegent decent player would go to the Academy thinking, I can kiss a pro career or a good part of it goodbye. No thanks, Army here I come.
    ———————————————-

    You don’t go to the service academies to pursue a career in pro sports. You go to serve your country. Any player who goes to the academies to facilitate a professional sports career does not belong there and is doing a disservice to the taxpayers who support the academies and to those who have served before them. They made a deal to serve at least five years upon graduation. Live up to the deal.

  6. If he played in New England they would have gotten around this “rule” long ago.

  7. He’s NOT shirking his commitment, he simply asked for his service time to be delayed until a later date as so many others have in the past as well. His chances of making the team aren’t great, but at the least he has a chance to fulfill a life-long dream. As a Navy vet, personally have no issue with his request/the Navy’s agreement at all…

  8. Commitment starts in September after he gets cut. He knows it. The NFL knows it. Just a publicity stunt.

  9. His pursuit of his dream is only a delay on his service to the country. I for one am glad he will get the fair shot to see if he has what it takes. I remember every time as a kid I saw the Spurs be introduced I always watched to see, “David Robinson, Navy.” And for those who say well he signed up to be in the Navy he should go do that and stop this nonsense I would say that a young man from a service academy playing in one of the major sports is a good example and will aid recruiting. People who are thinking of a fork in the road might say I can serve my country and play on the team. And after 4 years if I’ve got NFL, or NBA, or MLB, or Ice Hockey, or soccer opportunities cause I’ve played so well at least I can dream. Let the young man keep his dream until he’s forced to wake up. IMO

  10. SenorUgati says:
    July 6, 2021 at 2:06 pm

    You don’t go to the service academies to pursue a career in pro sports. You go to serve your country. Any player who goes to the academies to facilitate a professional sports career does not belong there and is doing a disservice to the taxpayers who support the academies and to those who have served before them. They made a deal to serve at least five years upon graduation. Live up to the deal.
    __________

    So sick of seeing the “the taxpayers support something” gibberish. Tax money supports a lot of things, and no one cares about the individual taxpayer’s opinion on those things. Your infinitesimal contribution to the academies budgets (assuming that you actually pay taxes) does not entitle you to any say as to how the institutions run their business, or as to how the Secretary of Defense decides to treat talented graduates.

  11. SenorUgati says:
    July 6, 2021 at 2:06 pm
    Major Whiplash says:
    July 6, 2021 at 1:16 pm
    Kind of a no brainer. If the NAVY stopped him from playing, no intellegent decent player would go to the Academy thinking, I can kiss a pro career or a good part of it goodbye. No thanks, Army here I come.
    ———————————————-

    You don’t go to the service academies to pursue a career in pro sports. You go to serve your country….They made a deal to serve at least five years upon graduation. Live up to the deal.
    _______

    Actually, people attend the academies to receive what is recognized to be an excellent education and to set themselves up for a good career in the business sector after fulfilling their minimum service commitment. This is 2021, no one is Pollyannaish enough to believe in the “serve your country” goofiness.

  12. I am not a member of the armed services. I had a grandfather who flew reconnaissance over France and Germany in WW2 and other family members who have also served. But even without that I think it’s insulting to claim that people don’t feel a sense of duty in many cases and they choose to serve in the armed forces that serve this country, not run it, and help preserve democracy. This is not a trade school for firearms and career planning and even those that never wear a uniform, like myself, respect those that do. They are owed that respect. So give it to them.

  13. Normally I would remind people, yet again, that he is not evading his obligation (just delaying it, possibly if he doesn’t get cut) or breaking any rules (the rules allow for such deferrals and define the procedure for applying for them).

    But by now I have learned that people are unwilling to acknowledge facts if inconvenient to their opinion.

  14. So how long can you “delay” your commission? 1 year 10? What about a person that wants to delay in order to raise a family, start a business etc. How is sports more important?

    How about you serve your country that paid a lot of money educating you first, then pursue your other interests. If you don’t want to do that, then you picked the wrong school.

  15. h56 says:
    July 6, 2021 at 8:00 pm
    So how long can you “delay” your commission? 1 year 10? What about a person that wants to delay in order to raise a family, start a business etc. How is sports more important?
    ——————————-
    If this dude has a 10 year nfl career he will be extremely valuable to the navy for recruiting and propaganda purposes. I think that’s what the navy was missing with the first ruling. There are probably 10-20 guys on that football team that at least had the glimmer of the NFL in their eye in high school. Knowing there was zero shot would have sent them off to another armed forces branch, hurting the navy. At least use these guys for propaganda like any other smart business would.

  16. Two professional Hall of Famers, Roger Staubach and David Robinson, delayed their entry into pro sports until they completed their service commitments. The rule needs to be changed to no exceptions, no waivers. If you want to become a pro athlete, there are hundreds of other schools that would love to have you. If your committment to serve isn’t your #1 priority, WTH would you go to a service academy in the first place? None of these guys are the next Roger Staubach. If he waited, so should they.

  17. knightwanderer says:
    July 6, 2021 at 7:01 pm
    I am not a member of the armed services. I had a grandfather who flew reconnaissance over France and Germany in WW2 and other family members who have also served. But even without that I think it’s insulting to claim that people don’t feel a sense of duty in many cases and they choose to serve in the armed forces that serve this country, not run it, and help preserve democracy. This is not a trade school for firearms and career planning and even those that never wear a uniform, like myself, respect those that do. They are owed that respect. So give it to them.
    ____________

    My grandfather served during WWI, and my father was in the Occupation Army in Japan after WWII. No disrespect is conveyed to past generations in recognizing that times and people have changed. Evolved people understand that shooting and bombing others is not the way to resolve conflicts. In fact, it is barbaric.

    The best way to honor those who served is to respect the opportunity they gave us to advance as a society. The best way to support those who currently serve is to not send them into a meat grinder based on some amorphous reason of “doing it for country”.

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