Panthers cut J.T. Ibe after practice hit that injured Keith Kirkwood

Las Vegas Raiders v Carolina Panthers
Getty Images

Panthers head coach Matt Rhule gave a positive update on wide receiver Keith Kirkwood‘s condition after Kirkwood left Tuesday’s practice in an ambulance.

Kirkwood got hit in the head while in a defenseless position by safety J.T. Ibe, which led to him being placed on a backboard while practice came to a halt. Rhule said Kirkwood has movement in his extremities and no pain in his neck as a result of the hit.

Rhule called that hit “completely unacceptable” while declining comment on Ibe’s future with the team. Shortly after Rhule finished speaking, the team announced that Ibe has been waived off of the 90-man roster.

Ibe signed with the Panthers in April after playing at Rice and South Carolina in college.

5 responses to “Panthers cut J.T. Ibe after practice hit that injured Keith Kirkwood

  1. I hope Keith makes a full and speedy recovery. It is sad that one mistake at practice can be a potential riches to rags story for Ibe.

  2. Seems like this could have been used as a learning moment instead of making an example of the player and creating a “look at me moment.”

  3. Honestly from peewee football all the way through high school half of every practice needs to be spent on how to properly hit someone.

  4. Someone mentioned that from peewee to high school needs to have hitting practice to teach technique. I think it should be in college as well. Reason #1 – guys do not have proper form a lot of the time. I know its not fun to square up and tackle a Derrick Henry straight on, but more often than not – proper tackling technique works. Reason #2 – all of NFL calibre athletes are usually so dominant at the HS and College level, that they can throw a shoulder into someone and knock them down or then can just stick an arm out and get a guy down. I think these kinds of things lead to these crazy flying head missiles that we see now from secondary guys.

  5. “Seems like this could have been used as a learning moment instead of making an example of the player and creating a “look at me moment.””

    —–

    Seems like it was used as a learning moment for everyone. The lesson was “you don’t injure your teammates, doofus.”

    Besides the team morale issues it brings up, it’s fair to conclude that anyone who can’t exert enough self-control not to hospitalize their own teammates is probably not going to be able to control themselves enough to avoid personal fouls in a game setting.

    They’re better off without him.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.