Judge accuses owners who failed to timely disclose financial information of playing “three-card monte”

Police officer Adam Danico displays three-card Monte game.
Getty Images

The NFL keeps taking L’s in St. Louis.

On Wednesday, Judge Christopher McGraugh issued $24,000 in fines and imposed $25,000 in legal fees over the failure of multiple owners to fully disclose financial information, as previously ordered.

“It does seem to me that your clients . . . are dragging their feet on this,” Judge McGraugh said, via the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “It seems like we’re in a three-card monte game.”

The judge fined Chiefs owner Clark Hunt $5,000, New York Giants co-owner John Mara $8,000, Cowboys owner Jerry Jones $6,000, and Patriots owner Robert Kraft $5,000 for not making complete disclosures in compliance with the court order. Judge McGraugh ruled in July that sufficient evidence existed as to those persons and Rams owner Stan Kroenke to support an award of punitive damages. That makes their financial situation relevant, and their financial information subject to disclosure.

Kroenke fully complied with the order.

As to the others, that’s not the end of it. On December 3, the lawyers for those four owners will return to court with an opportunity to “show cause” as to why they should not be held in contempt of court for failing to comply with the order to release the information.

The plaintiffs had tried for more than that. They wanted an order striking the pleadings and entering judgment against those owners, with the trial then focusing only on damages. The judge did not go that far, obviously.

Maybe, at some point, he will.

“This behavior just cannot go on,” Judge McGraugh said.

If it does, stronger sanctions could be coming.

17 responses to “Judge accuses owners who failed to timely disclose financial information of playing “three-card monte”

  1. All the fines listed are less than the value of each of those owners suit, shoes, shirt, and tie at the moment they were informed of the fines. Imagine if you cut A HUGE line to check out at the market. And the penalty was .01. That is what this is till some new development brings MASSIVE fines or somehow infringes on their overall business operations. Until that point this is skipping everyone in line and being told its one red cent. In other words zero “disincentive” at all.

  2. Fines like that are not even worth the effort. Subpoena the financial institutions that hold the accounts and follow the money.

  3. Urban Meyer is thinking”geez, I thought I had issues…between Jon Gruden and this St.Louis thing, I’m free and clear”

  4. This lawsuit has become the mouse that roared. Hopefully they get Goodell under oath. Imagine him trying to squirm out of topics like “Please explain what a football catch is” or “Describe your decades long plan to destroy the National Football League.”

  5. weepingjebus says:
    October 14, 2021 at 7:48 am
    This lawsuit has become the mouse that roared. Hopefully they get Goodell under oath. Imagine him trying to squirm out of topics like “Please explain what a football catch is” or “Describe your decades long plan to destroy the National Football League.”
    _____________

    Yeah, right. Goodell wants to destroy the organization that pays him $40 million a year. And, of course, all of the owners that he works for want him destroy their business.

  6. Does this mean Washington’s Napoleon Snyder complied? Perhaps we should have him to publicly disclose what he sent!

  7. Those fines are laughable. THese men are worth billions of dollars. A $5,000 fine is like normal people getting fined of less than fifty cents.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.