Sean Taylor’s brother claims he got short notice of jersey retirement

Buffalo Bills v Washington Redskins
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When it comes to the sudden news that Washington safety Sean Taylor’s jersey will be retired on Sunday, two possible explanations apply to the timing of the announcement, which was made only three days before the event.

One, the team set things up well in advance and deliberately chose, for whatever reason, to delay the announcement until roughly 72 hours before the game. Two, the team hastily arranged for the Sean Taylor jersey retirement as a distraction from the withering criticism arising from the persistent failure to disclose 650,000 emails from a workplace misconduct investigation that already have been weaponized against Jon Gruden and Jeff Pash.

Sean Taylor’s brother, Gabe, told 106.7 The Fan on Friday that he found out about the event roughly four days earlier. The tweets from 106.7 The Fan don’t address whether the rest of the family received such short notice, but the short notice received by Gabe Taylor suggests that this isn’t something that was in the works for weeks and weeks.

The simplest explanation is that this was thrown together quickly. The idea that the team would decide to retire Taylor’s jersey and hide that information makes no sense, because this is the kind of thing that will sell more tickets. Common sense suggests that the announcement would have been made a long time ago. Common sense suggests that, given the late notice, the event was slapped together quickly. Common sense suggests that, indeed, it was and is a bright shiny object at a time when the franchise is reeling from the renewed focus on its longstanding culture of workplace misconduct.

As our friend Big Cat likes to say, dysfunctional teams do dysfunctional things. Despite the many positive changes made to the organization in the past 20 months, plenty of dysfunction lingers. And it’s still trickling down from the very top.

23 responses to “Sean Taylor’s brother claims he got short notice of jersey retirement

  1. Sean Taylor should 100% have his jersey retired b/c he deserves to be remembered for how great he was in a short time! That said, this jesture should have been planned properly with the fitting fanfare, NOT as some lame diversion. Shameful.

    -Eagles fan

  2. It’s hard to get a PR job in the NFL, right? These guys act like they hired a high schooler to do it after class.

  3. As a lifelong diehard fan of this franchise and an even bigger fan of Sean Taylor’s I am truly disgusted by the manner in which this was hastily put together. This unfortunately has become the final straw, I am done in every manner with this team. Deplorable ownership and continual dysfunction has eroded my fandom to the point I want nothing to do with this team….signing out for good!

  4. Synder and the leaderships actions tell us how little they think of the great Sean Taylor and the fanbases’ general IQ. To think we would be so easily fooled by such an obvious attempt at distraction – quite the insult. As the saying goes, there is something rotten at Ashburn and its been rotting for 20+ years now.

  5. simplest explanation is that the shipping problems in this country, and they weren’t entirely sure if everything would be there. What about the 100 alumni? I would love to hear when they were notified to come. You can’t order towels and programs that fast. I honestly can’t even get anything that quick at this time

  6. I don’t understand the adoration this guy gets. He was a first round pick who was arrested twice in his first year and a half in the league and demanded a new contract in just his second year. His death was a terrible, and he was obviously talented. But why does everyone idolize this guy? I honestly don’t get it.

  7. As a 57 year fan of the Redskins, it still amazes me the NFL continues to let Snyder own this team. I have gotten to the point where I can no longer watch on Sunday. I really resent how the NFL is treating the leagues most loyal fan base.

  8. Sean Taylor although an amazing player does not deserve his number retired. Tom Brady does in New England because of his length of time playing and his considerable achievements that will never be replicated. Sean played for only four years had 12 interceptions and 2 sacks. Honestly is that jersey retirement worthy? Lots of players have died and although tragic this is such a transparent and pathetic move by Snyder yet again. WFT fans, pleade stop attending games until the conclusions from the investigation are released unredacted.

  9. For the WFT to do this now just to create a diversion from their scandal does a dishonor to Sean Taylor and his family. The timing is terrible.

  10. It’s beyond disgusting that a team would use the memory of a murdered player as a pawn in a PR game.

    I hope the family chooses not to legitimize this insulting sideshow with their attendance.

  11. The people saying he doesn’t deserve his number being retired and quoting his stats have never played football at a high level. Having your number retired doesn’t just involve stats. It also involves your impact on the game and most importantly your impact on the organization. Had he not passed so soon he would’ve been the best safety to play the game. It’s disrespectful to to question his number retirement.

  12. touchback6 says:
    October 16, 2021 at 8:59 am

    It’s hard to get a PR job in the NFL, right? These guys act like they hired a high schooler to do it after class.

    ————————————————————————–

    You could be the best PR person in the world. But when you have an owner like Snyder, how do you spin that hot mess into something positive? At some point, it just becomes to much to polish.

    Like most rabid fans I have teams I can’t stand and don’t mind seeing struggle. But I wouldn’t wish this on my worst enemy. I really hope all this time spent on this is to make a case so thorough they can finally force Snyder to sell. He’s a disgrace to himself, his family, that team, and the league and he’s got to go. Having their jersey retired should be an honor for any player. In this situation, it’s just tarnishing them by association.

  13. Maybe they should start putting video cameras in restrooms. Maybe there was a crime committed within five miles of the restroom, and you just never know what it would turn up. Release it for public consumption. Great idea. Let everyone take a peek. This is fun, right? We’re a sick bunch.

  14. Now the news is they many alumni knew this was the case, way back in September 20 or so. Would love a piece about it, but we know how this works when it’s not a part of a narrative. I’m not into making up or creating a motive even when the team itself is awful and bad and wrong. This just lends itself into a much larger problem. Being impartial no longer exists is the key.

  15. greenlantern says:
    October 16, 2021 at 1:54 pm
    The people saying he doesn’t deserve his number being retired and quoting his stats have never played football at a high level. Having your number retired doesn’t just involve stats. It also involves your impact on the game and most importantly your impact on the organization. Had he not passed so soon he would’ve been the best safety to play the game. It’s disrespectful to to question his number retirement.

    ——————

    You don’t need to have played to have an opinion on this. He had a hot start career like so many. The fact that his chance to continue that doesn’t negate the fact that players just don’t get in with a three year resume. His impact on the game? He helped make them watchable. His impact on the organization? He was arrested twice and held out after one year, creating a headache. He hardly put them on the map. Fact is, the guy was good, but his death created this myth that he was somehow a “legendary” talent. He wasn’t. Facts aren’t disrespect. Retiring his number undeservedly for a PR stunt is.

  16. What a great and accurate quote, dysfunctional teams do dysfunctional things

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