Investigation of Washington Football Team didn’t include text messages

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While investigating the Washington Football Team’s workplace issues, attorney Beth Wilkinson stumbled over enough to get her to gather more than 650,000 emails that, per the league, were sent by or to former team president Bruce Allen and that fell beyond the scope of the investigation.

For some reason (still not disclosed by the league), Wilkinson did not examine emails sent by or to other current or former team employees. For some reason (still not disclosed by the league), the investigation did not extend to text messages. The NFL informed PFT on Tuesday, in response to an email inquiry from PFT, that the investigation did not include text messages.

You know, text messages. The format where people tend to be WAY more relaxed and revealing than they are when typing emails. The format that the NFL aggressively harvested when trying to jam the square peg of prevailing atmospheric conditions into the round hole of evidence of deliberate deflation of footballs used by the Patriots in the 2014 AFC Championship.

The more we learn, the less sense any of this makes. How did Bruce Allen send or receive, on average, 178 emails per day every day for a decade? How did the emails sent to Allen by Jon Gruden and Jeff Pash leak? Why won’t the NFL, which has hidden information about the WFT investigation by citing confidentiality concerns as to employees who came forward, release 650,000 emails that by the league’s admission fall beyond the scope of the investigation?

They’re hiding something. They’re hiding a lot. They’re hoping that the passage of time and the playing of more games will cause the issue to die down.

It most definitely should not. But we can only do so much. Others with investigative resources need to be chasing answers to the unanswered questions. Others with standing to sue need to be exploring all legal options for compelling the materials to be produced. Others with license to hold hearings on the inner workings of a sports league that relies heavily on the attention, funding, and confidence of the public need to demand transparency.

I’ve been encourage by multiple people with multiple teams and, frankly, within the league office to keep pushing this issue. To not let the story go away. To continue to press for the truth to come out.

There’s plenty of truth that is currently being hidden behind the curtain. They want us to pay no attention to the man behind the curtain. That’s all the more reason to be zealous and vigilant about peeling it back and getting a look at what’s really going on.

13 responses to “Investigation of Washington Football Team didn’t include text messages

  1. Keep pushing this. If they don’t want to tell what the truth is, they’re hiding something. Don’t let them get away with it by dropping it.

  2. So, why is it that it takes this incident, another 345 Park Ave Special of lying, deceit and corruption for the media to not cover this more feverishsly?

    Why did 2/3 judges tell Goodell Article 46 allows him to break US law? It doesn’t make any sense.

    I just think it’s odd who the real culprit has been behind the shenanigans being so obvious, yet we have people who post here that are obtuse to see it.

    I mean, we’d learn why he cheat$, why he framed the Pats even though intelligent people already know, why he protects certain teams, and so forth.

    Why does the general media at large just take what the NFL says as gospel the last 15 years, when it’s clear they lie, get caught lying in federal courts, and then lie some more?

    Always go to the source of the issue. That source of the corruption is at 345 Park Ave.

  3. Who dislikes the Raiders? And Al specifically? (released on Al’s death anniversary is too much of a coincidence). It all points back to Goodell.

  4. As someone who did eDiscovery and Records Management as a profession normal text messages (phone to phone) are almost impossible to collect.

    Unlike emails which are on a computer or server (where they sit FOREVER unless someone has a and enforces a data\records management program) emails exist only on phones and for a relatively short time (3-6 months) at the service provider. And of by the way the service provider will fight tooth and nail to not have to preserve and produce them.

    And even if an attorney was foolish enough to fight with the provider the the costs of doing a search for them (do you know how many texts a Verizon handles in a single day) is prohibitive.

    Emails are the easiest (and most damning) part of eDiscovery. More than half the time if you are the defendant you quickly learn you are screwed not saved by saving all that useless data.

  5. “How did the emails sent to Allen by Jon Gruden and Jeff Pash leak? ”

    This is the very question I wish people were more focused on. A head coach not involved in the investigation lost his job over this. We should know how this happened and that entity needs to be held accountable. There needs to be more accountability and transparency but I personally draw the line at releasing to the public things not relevant to the investigation or the leaks. I really want to know the reason for leaking emails against Gruden, whomever did it.

  6. Paraphrasing George Costanza… It’s like peeling an onion… The more layers you peel, the more it stinks.

  7. As you know, Florio, I disagree with you and your takes 99.8% of the time! This is one of the 0.2%! This stinks so bad and nobody, save yourself, is trying to get to the bottom of it. Does the NFL have that much power over all media?!?!?!? It’s a crying shame. Please continue to push the issue and if anyone gets “tired” of your posts about it, they can easily skip over them.

  8. As I always wish someone in the media would ask and demand answers to the fact Jerry Richardson was forced to sell his team and his behaviour was 10% of Daniel Snyder’s.

  9. Can you specifically clarify whether you include the players as “employees” when you demand all communication be released?

  10. Ok, what’s quoted below is true, BUT, heaven forbid, you or anyone else with a platform, puts the microscope on the Super Bowl halftime show performers. When are we going to see some of these answers “being chased” by this site?
    ————
    “It most definitely should not. But we can only do so much. Others with investigative resources need to be chasing answers to the unanswered questions. Others with standing to sue need to be exploring all legal options for compelling the materials to be produced. Others with license to hold hearings on the inner workings of a sports league that relies heavily on the attention, funding, and confidence of the public need to demand transparency.”

  11. Sending and receiving 178 emails per day is not difficult,, especially if they included the junk mail. A C-Level employee is inundated with email. Receiving it and reading it are not the same thing. Executive assistants usually have full access to the executive’s mailbox and handle the bulk of the messages and a NDA is part of their job.

    My guess is the majority is mundane but there are some gems in there.

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