Frank Reich on Carson Wentz’s improvisations: Don’t want too much, but we trust him

Jacksonville Jaguars v Indianapolis Colts
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Colts quarterback Carson Wentz has shown a willingness to do just about anything from throwing left-handed to trying a shovel pass under pressure in order to make a play and that habit can sometimes backfire on him.

One example of that came late in their Week Eight loss to the Titans when Wentz’s lefty throw from his own end zone was returned for a touchdown by Titans corner Elijah Molden. He avoided those outcomes against the Jaguars this Sunday, but still flashed the improvisations that add the risk of turnovers to his game.

Colts head coach Frank Reich would prefer Wentz only used his right arm to throw the ball, but noted that Wentz has only turned the ball over six times this season while applauding the “conscious effort” the quarterback has made to be more careful with the ball than he was in Philadelphia.

“You’ve got to put some parameters, some guidelines on him, but at the end of the day, you’ve got to trust the player and his instincts,” Reich said, via Joel A. Erickson of the Indianapolis Star. “It doesn’t mean you can’t coach him, it doesn’t mean you can’t tell him what you like and what you don’t like, but he still has to feel like you believe in him.”

The Colts have won four of their last five games and Wentz has played turnover-free football the last two weeks. Both of those things make it easier to believe in Wentz’s stewardship of the offense heading into this Sunday’s game against the Bills.

3 responses to “Frank Reich on Carson Wentz’s improvisations: Don’t want too much, but we trust him

  1. For better or worse, Reich is right. Wentz is a backup-level quarterback as a pocket passer. It’s when he extends plays that he shines.

    Check out his career passer ratings from the pocket vs. outside the pocket: it’s a very stark contrast.

  2. loldeepball says:

    November 16, 2021 at 8:58 am

    For better or worse, Reich is right. Wentz is a backup-level quarterback as a pocket passer. It’s when he extends plays that he shines.

    Check out his career passer ratings from the pocket vs. outside the pocket: it’s a very stark contrast
    ——–
    It’s always funny when people make stuff up that’s easily able to be proven wrong. Wentz #’s inside the pocket has been lower yes(which is the case for nearly every qb as playaction/bootlegs cut the field down) BUT even setting that aside Wentz #s in the pocket in past years put him in the middle of the league NOWHERE NEAR “backup-level qb”

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