Packers raise nearly $25 million in first day of latest stock sale

USA TODAY Sports

They’re not really selling stock. They’re passing the hat. And on the first day of doing so, the hat filled up quickly.

Via the Green Bay Press Gazette, the Packers on Tuesday sold 83,000 of 300,000 available shares. That’s $24.9 million in free money.

And even though it’s a donation with a piece of memorabilia attached to it (there’s also a $35 “handling fee” for each certificate issued), fans can choose to spend their money however they want. Frankly, it’s far better to have the team’s fans give money voluntarily than for billionaire owners to use threats of relocation to compel politicians to find a way to use taxpayer money to pay for stadium construction and/or renovation without a public vote. Because whenever there’s a public vote on using taxpayer money to finance a football stadium it fails. Because most people in a given community don’t care enough about the football team to pay for a local football factory at which the local football owner will make even more billions.

It’s ultimately no different than the concept of the Personal Seat License. It’s money for nothing, a cash grab made by football teams because they can. Because fans are sufficiently fanatical to stuff their discretionary income into the fully-stocked coffers of oligarchs who realize that there’s indeed a sucker born every nanosecond.

Football fans are self-admitted suckers. I’m one of them. But for that bizarre threat of a fine of up to $500,000 for criticizing the NFL or anyone connected to it, my $335 would be among the money the Packers made yesterday. It still may happen, bizarre threat of a half-million-dollar fine for daring to criticize anything about the NFL be damned.

At least when it comes to the Packers, there’s no billionaire behind the curtain who will siphon profits to buy a megayacht.

26 responses to “Packers raise nearly $25 million in first day of latest stock sale

  1. Talk about suckers …. I am going to see the Steelers play the Chargers at SoFi Stadium this Sunday and I paid 3K for two tickets that aren’t even really great seats. Also Staples Center will become Crypto.com Arena on Christmas Day no less.

  2. I’m not a sucker for the NFL. Don’t pay for cable or satellite tv. Never payed a $ for an NFL product or any merchandise and never will. Go for it you suckers!!!!

  3. Don’t mistake $335 as some sort of life changing amount we can’t recover from. Lol. It’s going to make my 12 yr olds day when he opens it on Xmas. It’s about the memories, not the money.

  4. I’m sorry, what’s the difference between this and a Johnny Manziel jersey?

  5. Say what you want, but in Nashville the vote passed and tax dollars were used to build the stadium in Titan Town 22 years ago.

  6. Yikes! A piece of paper has a $35 “handling fee”? That’s like ordering concert tickets online and paying a $20 “convenience fee.” Highway robbery if you ask me.

    Oh well ….

  7. domefieldadvantage says:

    “A fool and his money…”
    ———————–
    No different than a framed jersey hanging on the wall or a cased football up on the mantle. Its called sports memorabilia. To each their own how they prefer to spend their own money.

  8. The difference between this and other NFL memorabilia is the other teams don’t con you into thinking you’re a part owner of the team.

    Yeah, Packer fans say they know better, but I went to that Packer stock website yesterday. Owning a piece of the team is exactly how they market it.

  9. I purchased a share yesterday for my son. Though he is too young to appreciate it now, I think as he gets older it will be something cool for him. The bonus is he can refer to the team as we and when someone asks if he is a player or owner he can say yes.

  10. > No different than a framed jersey hanging on the wall or a cased football up on the mantle. Its called sports memorabilia.

    On any given week there are about 1500 game worn jerseys. In a season, about 30,000. Not all of them are keepers.

    These are 300,000 pieces of paper. See the difference?

  11. The difference between this and other NFL memorabilia is the other teams don’t con you into thinking you’re a part owner of the team.
    —–
    Even though it’s printed on the front of the cert in big bold letters that it’s not really stock, you still think it’s a con and people aren’t aware of what they’re buying? Yikes.

  12. A sucker would imply that the person buying the Packers stock doesn’t understand that it has no financial value. I bought some several years ago with full understanding that it was not worth anything, but I like having it on my wall in my my home office so it was money well spent.

  13. I am thinking that other teams will pick up the concept at some point of selling stock to their fans but from the comments it sounds like it will be a hard sell and most fans will stick it to their team because they are not suckers, hopefully that team doesn’t demand to raise the city taxes to pay for a new stadium with threat of moving. Voluntary taxes are great and will keep the Packers where they are.

  14. It is so incredibly humbling to be a fan of the only NFL team having fans with the financial wherewithal to be able to purchase their own team.

  15. Everybody knows that it’s not really stock. It’s a donation to the Packers and these fans feel pretty good about that. It sure beats having a billionaire owner threaten to move your team if he can’t extort the fan base for millions in tax dollars.

  16. Packer fans know exactly what they’re buying, with enthusiasm, without question, and without regret. If anyone thinks they do not, then who’s the idiot?

  17. clk55amg36 says:
    November 17, 2021 at 12:57 pm
    Christmas bonuses for the Packers front office… I hope it’s tax-deductible!
    _______

    At least its voluntary and not something they are FORCING on people like taxpayers as several pro teams in many leagues have done in the past.

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