Pacman Jones believes Colin Kaepernick wants to play, but partially agrees with Antonio Brown’s criticism

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When former NFL Colin Kaepernick sat down for an interview with the I Am Athlete podcast, former NFL cornerback Pacman Jones was one of the former players who questioned Kaepernick. Now, Jones is joining former NFL receiver Antonio Brown in questioning whether Kaepernick is doing enough to put his causes into action.

“As far as the community part, I think AB is right,” Jones said, via TMZ.com. “We haven’t heard anything that Kaep did for the community or given back to the community after the settlement [with the NFL]. . . . That part of the question, I do think AB is right.”

If you haven’t seen it, you aren’t looking. It’s not hard to find tangible proof. For example, Kaepernick created the Know Your Rights Camp, “to raise awareness on higher education, self empowerment, and instructions on how to properly interact with law enforcement in various scenarios.” That group donated $1.75 million to Black and Brown communities in 2020 to assist with COVID relief. More donations are listed on his official website.

Jones disagrees with Brown’s assessment that Kaepernick doesn’t want to play.

“I just think it’s hard for a guy to fairytale for 2.5 hours, three hours every day throwing the ball if you don’t want to play,” Jones said. “I think he wants to play. Do he deserve to play? That’s another question. But, do he want to play? I do think he wants to play.”

It’s unclear why Jones questions whether Kaepernick “deserves” to play. It would be nice to know when Jones seems equivocal on that point.

Jones has a separate concern regarding Kaepernick’s reluctance to play wherever he can play, if the goal is to get back to the NFL.

“I actually asked him that on the show, because that was one of my points,” Jones said. “If you want to play so bad, why wouldn’t you go and get film? He’s adamant about the situation that he’s an NFL quarterback. That was the part that kind of made me go a different way. Because I had a chance to get football taken away from me, and I was to the point where I wanted to play so bad that I would have went and played anywhere.”

That’s not a bad point, but it’s important to remember that, while Jones nearly lost football due to his own misbehavior, Kaepernick had been shunned for five years and counting despite not breaking a single on- or off-field rule. It’s easy to see why he would refuse to play in a different league when he believes his ability to play in the NFL was wrongfully taken away from him.

He continues to be shunned, by the way. No one has brought him in for a workout. Even now, with rookie minicamps happening throughout the league and various veterans invited to participate on a tryout basis, no one has shown any inclination to invite Kaepernick.

And no one will. The ship has sailed.

Even if he goes to another league and generates the best film the NFL has ever seen, owners who have decided to kneel before those who hate Kaepernick for kneeling during the anthem will continue to find excuses not to give him a chance. Barring something incredible unexpected and beyond stunning, that is definitely not changing, now or ever.

40 responses to “Pacman Jones believes Colin Kaepernick wants to play, but partially agrees with Antonio Brown’s criticism

  1. Colin Kaepernick’s professional protesting funded by Nike…is far more lucrative than any backup QB contract he could potentially land in the NFL.

  2. Kaep broke one major on-field rule: don’t play horribly. Look up the Fox Sports article (written before his kneeling exploits) “You probably forgot how bad Colin Kaepernick was last year” November 15, 2016.

  3. Overestimating his own skills and his own relevance. I would love to see a team sign him to a camp tryout just so everyone will finally shutup about this.

  4. Maybe Pacman Jones and Antonio Brown should run for president and vice-president. It sounds like they’d have a lot of support as people who could come in and solve all our problems.

  5. The thing that always bothers me about the Kaep situation is when writers, especially in the know when it comes to the how the NFL works, always fail to acknowledge this didn’t start with kneeling.

    It started with sitting. He lost his starting job and when the team was standing for the national anthem he started sitting for it. No prior announcement as to why. I think that gives people the impression that this didn’t start with some social justice initiative, it started with sulking over a lost starting job that morphed into the opportunity to extend an expiring 15 minutes of fame.

    It may be just an impression he gave but when you take the sequence of events into context of the fact the Ravens offered him a contract, and the NFL offered him a workout and all that, it’s hard to draw other conclusions.

  6. Jones and Brown are the last two guys who should be questioning the character of somebody else .

  7. Kaepernick has done plenty to get himself blackballed. And you conveniently forgot to include Kaepernick refusing anything but starter money. He’s playing the politics and people like you eat it up.

  8. If only there was another league that Kaep could play in to prove everyone wrong and shut them up…

  9. “Continue to find excuses” is a strange phrasing for “terrible”, which was PFT’s 2016 judgment of Kaep’s performance. That is the reason that Kaep isn’t in the league–he had a great year and then crashed back to earth.

  10. PacMan Jones, with a stellar history of high character, now a voice of reason we must listen too. The world is going mad

  11. Let’s put the CK drama to rest, he’s an RPO QB who can’t get to his 2nd read on a pass play, he’s taking off and running. And his insistence on starter money? He had a couple of good seasons in a Greg Roman RPO offense before the League caught on to his limited understanding of the playbook and basically dismantled his artificial career. As far as the kneeling/police brutality thing goes, if he was REALLY serious about making a change he would organized community groups to record/film/expose police brutality nationwide rather than exploit that kneeling sideshow.

    Is he good enough to be a backup QB in the NFL? Probably, but he’s not smart enough to humble himself, put together solid film in the CFL or another league and ban the kneeling B.S. from his bag of tricks. The NFL paid him off and so did Nike, for shooting off his mouth needlessly and killing his NFL career.

  12. People seem to forget he went vegan and lost a lot of muscle mass. Came back with a noodle arm on top of that.

  13. “the NFL was wrongfully taken away from him“

    1. Playing in the NFL is a privilege not a right.
    2. Kaepernick opted out of his contract.

  14. So many people lying is major problem in this country. Admit you don’t a guy because he took a stand but don’t lie about the quality of his play. He was better than most back ups playing now and probably than some starters. Darnell and Jones both stink.

  15. I don’t think that Antonio Brown’s opinion counts for much…not with his track record.

  16. As long as you’re not in jail, there is very little a talented QB could do to keep a team from paying him tons to play football. It is the most in demand position in sports. This idea that there is collusion to keep him from playing because of the knee thing is a tired and lazy. He is a run first QB in his 30s that doesn’t throw with accuracy. Show me an offense that needs that.

  17. singularitynow says:
    May 14, 2022 at 2:45 pm
    The thing that always bothers me about the Kaep situation is when writers, especially in the know when it comes to the how the NFL works, always fail to acknowledge this didn’t start with kneeling.

    It started with sitting. He lost his starting job and when the team was standing for the national anthem he started sitting for it. No prior announcement as to why. I think that gives people the impression that this didn’t start with some social justice initiative, it started with sulking over a lost starting job that morphed into the opportunity to extend an expiring 15 minutes of fame.

    It may be just an impression he gave but when you take the sequence of events into context of the fact the Ravens offered him a contract, and the NFL offered him a workout and all that, it’s hard to draw other conclusions.

    ——————————–

    This a flat out lie.

  18. The fact that two character troubled men feel that they can judge Kap’s actions is simply mind blowing

  19. Why, why do we still need to talk about this? I’m convinced when there is nothing to report, this guy comes out of the wood works. It’s simply put, CK took his privilege of being in the NFL, and exploited to create a (major, highly controversial) political agenda. It doesn’t matter if it’s Tom Brady, you go down that rabbit hole, you’re going to be shunned. The only person that I’ve seen who is pulling it off has been LeBron

  20. This is what we get in the off season. A former quarterback, a former cornerback, and a former receiver looking for attention.

  21. Good People of Earth, I submit to you my references, Mr. Pacman Jones.

  22. If he wanted to play football that desperately, he’d be in the USFL right now. That’s where the guys that ate desperate to play and want that recognition and hopefully another chance in the NFL have gone.

  23. Antonio Brown & Pacman Jones, the poster children of civility, rendering judgement on the behavior of others. Gotta love it.

  24. Kap is too chicken to try out for a USFL team. It might reveal how badly he plays these days. Instead he participates in a silly “come and watch me throw a football at my former coach’s school.” Which didn’t prove anything! I understand Harbaugh wanting to help his old QB, but it didn’t. Instead it just made them both appear to be silly. It was an embarrassment to my alma mater, and for what? Just a meaningless publicity stunt that did nothing to “prove” whether Kap is still any better than he was at reading a Defense. Nobody wants this guy, nor, apparently, the arrogant Mayfield either. They both made their own beds. Now they have to lie in them. It’s called life, losers!

  25. I know you hate to see it Florio but even some of Kaps former colleagues just want him to go away. A lot of wasted media attention gets put on this guy because he USED to be good awhile back. He’s not coming back. He never will. His window is closed. Elsa it and let it go brother.

  26. choqui21 says:
    May 14, 2022 at 4:33 pm
    Let’s put the CK drama to rest, he’s an RPO QB who can’t get to his 2nd read on a pass play, he’s taking off and running. And his insistence on starter money? He had a couple of good seasons in a Greg Roman RPO offense before the League caught on to his limited understanding of the playbook and basically dismantled his artificial career. As far as the kneeling/police brutality thing goes, if he was REALLY serious about making a change he would organized community groups to record/film/expose police brutality nationwide rather than exploit that kneeling sideshow.
    ————————————————
    You have no idea what an RPO actually is.

    Sad

  27. qckappa says:
    May 14, 2022 at 5:12 pm
    So many people lying is major problem in this country. Admit you don’t a guy because he took a stand but don’t lie about the quality of his play. He was better than most back ups playing now and probably than some starters. Darnell and Jones both stink.
    —————-
    How could you possibly know how good he could play NOW?? He has not played for SIX years and has not shown any improvements in his ability to read a defense, which was his Number One problem….smh….

  28. firejerry says:
    May 14, 2022 at 9:56 pm
    Will he play for a minimum contract?????
    —————————-
    That is a Very Good Question! Also, when he refers to “We” in his statements about starting out as a Backup and then forcing his way up, who is he referring to? Will the potential team be okay with a Backup QB having an Entourage?….

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