Fox CEO says reports of $375 million over 10 years for Tom Brady is “directionally right”

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Two weeks ago, Fox turned to sports world on its head by announcing that Tom Brady will become the No. 1 NFL analyst whenever he retires from playing.

Not long after Fox Corp. CEO Lachlan Murdoch announced the deal, Andrew Marchand of the New York Post (owned by Fox Corp.) reported that the deal has a value of $375 million over 10 years. A Fox spokesman responded by saying this: “What has been reported isn’t an accurate description of the deal and we have not released details beyond what was disclosed on our quarterly earnings call.”

In a new interview with Sara Fischer of Axios.com, Murdoch was asked about the reported value of the Brady deal. Murdoch said that the number is “directionally right.”

That seems to be a more appropriate way of saying “dead-on balls accurate.”

Murdoch also said that Fox and Brady started negotiating the deal “months ago.”

It remains to be seen when Brady will get started. It all depends on how much longer he plays. However, he now knows that, whenever he wants, he can make $37.5 million per year from Fox to not play.

13 responses to “Fox CEO says reports of $375 million over 10 years for Tom Brady is “directionally right”

  1. I like how Brady goes about his business. I am just not sure how good he will be on TV. I remember Joe Montana was highly sought after when he retired and after some time in front of the camera and a bad SNL appearance he was back to just doing commercials. With that said if you can get someone to pay that kind of money for 10 years before ever making do real TV time you sign that deal and give your agent a big kiss.

  2. The main reason Buck and Aikman wanted out. If youre going to pay Tommy… a guy with zero commenting experience that much to come in… we want 800 Billion! Way to go FOX. Always knew you were the lesser of the two between CBS and FOX.

  3. I think what we can gather from this contract is that Brady will be retiring from active play sooner than he otherwise would.

  4. The sucking up to Brady is going to be over the top. We’re not far off from the TBFL.

  5. BuckyBadger says:
    May 24, 2022 at 12:40 pm
    I like how Brady goes about his business. I am just not sure how good he will be on TV. I remember Joe Montana was highly sought after when he retired and after some time in front of the camera and a bad SNL appearance he was back to just doing commercials. With that said if you can get someone to pay that kind of money for 10 years before ever making do real TV time you sign that deal and give your agent a big kiss.

    ————-

    How could anyone be sure given we’ve never seen Brady try to call a game before, and he certainly doesn’t seem like a natural in front of the camera the way Peyton does for example. That said, he’s willing to put himself out there. He’s never been much for protecting his legacy. He doesn’t worry about if he might lose football games and he’s not worried about failure here either. Good for him.

    For any fans that wish Brady would just hide away like Michael Jordan and remain a sacred figure, too bad for them. It’s his life.

  6. dspyank2k11 says:
    May 24, 2022 at 1:40 pm
    The main reason Buck and Aikman wanted out. If youre going to pay Tommy… a guy with zero commenting experience that much to come in… we want 800 Billion! Way to go FOX. Always knew you were the lesser of the two between CBS and FOX.

    ———-

    They obviously weren’t going to re-sign Buck and Aikman. Fox Sports were committed to a different direction with Brady already.

  7. All the naysayers will be watching Brady whether they admit it here or not. People are too happy to tune in hopes that Brady will fail. And if he does fail they will rejoice. If he succeeds, they will be mad and still watch.

  8. Brady will simply not allow himself to be ordinary. He will prepare for his broadcasting gig the same way he prepares to play football … purposefully, thoughtfully, relentlessly. He’s probably watched more film than anyone ever and he will study the top analysts — Madden, Collingsworth, Aikman, Romo. A lot will depend on how he expresses criticism. Collingsworth’s take on the goal-line pass in Super Bowl XIX is a good model for that. Whether we will find his analyses compelling will depend mostly on how forthcoming he is, how blunt. He cannot do what he’s done in post-game pressers: evade and obfuscate. He can’t worry about offending anyone. I think he knows that. Or will. He’ll be ready and we’ll be tuning in.

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