NFL expands Rooney Rule to require interviewing a minority for QB coach vacancies

New England Patriots v Miami Dolphins
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The NFL has expanded the Rooney Rule and will now require all teams with a vacancy for the quarterbacks coach to interview at least one minority for the job.

The league announced the change to the rule today, as part of its diversity seminar ahead of this week’s league meeting. Amid criticism that there aren’t enough Black head coaches, the league has been trying to ensure more opportunities for minorities to work their way through the ranks in key coaching positions.

The NFL initially adopted the Rooney Rule in 2003, requiring NFL teams to interview a minority candidate before hiring a head coach. The rule was expanded in 2009 to require NFL teams to interview a minority candidate before hiring a new general manager as well. In 2020 the rule expanded to coordinators, and in 2021 the rule expanded once again to require two minorities to be interviewed for head-coaching vacancies.

Now the league is expanding the Rooney Rule again, at a time when the rule itself is being criticized. Some in the coaching community, most prominently Brian Flores, say all the rule does is lead to teams conducting sham interviews. The league needs not only to ensure the interviews are conducted, but to ensure that the interviews are genuine.

9 responses to “NFL expands Rooney Rule to require interviewing a minority for QB coach vacancies

  1. Why not mandate the Rooney Rule for the entire coaching staff? It would make sense.

  2. Why expand a rule that is having a negative effect on getting minority head coaches? Handing out token positions and interviews is no way to accomplish equality. If they would have just let things happen naturally there would be at least twice as much diversity among the coaching ranks but the do gooders just have to stick their nose in. All these rules do is give false interviews to candidates which in turn might be teaching them bad habits for interviews.

  3. The Patriots must have known this was coming when they decided to not formally assign coaches to positions.

  4. David – I have been saying this for years. I mean how many coaches got to be a coach because they started as interns and assistant stats guys and worked their way up – a whole bunch. Unless the whole coaching staff is representative of the number of players on the field – no wonder that the supposed cream ie top dogs are what they are.

  5. I can’t tell you how happy I would be to get interviewed for a job I know they didn’t want me for. It’s insulting.

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