Heinz Field name change requires plenty of work, and not much time to get it done

Heinz Quarterly Profits Decline As Sales Climb
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When it comes to changing the name of Heinz Field, the Steelers need to move much faster than the product contained in the bottles that previously hovered over the end-zone scoreboard.

Mark Belko of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette looks at the steps that must be taken to make the transition.

The Steelers have, as Belko puts it, a “tight deadline” for getting things done before the regular-season opener. And things are happening quickly. The Heinz Field signs are down. The giant ketchup receptacles have been removed.

That’s just the beginning. Steelers V.P. of sales and marketing Ryan Huzjak told Belko that as many as 100 signs pointing fans in the direction of “Heinz Field” need to be changed. On the digital side, adjustments will be necessary for websites, social media, and more.

Given the significant uptick in naming-rights revenue, from $2.87 million per year to, reportedly, more than $10 million per year, it’s worth the effort. It’s also worth the local and national heat the Steelers have taken for dumping a name that had become iconic for a company of which no one had heard.

“Change is hard,” Huzjak told Belko. “Change is not easy. We recognize that this is a pretty abrupt change and so we recognize that there’s going to be different and in some cases visceral reactions to that. Again, I think we just chalk that up to the fact that it’s an important thing, and it’s meaningful to a lot of people.”

The first game of the preseason will be played at not-Heinz Field on August 13. On September 11, the Steelers host the Bengals.

12 responses to “Heinz Field name change requires plenty of work, and not much time to get it done

  1. 10 million for naming rights, and in this article the old sponsor’s name is mentioned several times- the new one? Zero.

  2. I love how this is presented as some huge hardship like we should drop notes of encouragement in the mail hoping these executives make it through this okay.

  3. Pretty sure Heintz could have offorded the $10M a year. Its a drop in the bucket for that huge corporation.

    If i were a Steelers fan i would show my support to the company that offered to fund my team the most. Not knock them. Heintz didnt step up.

  4. Who pays for the infrastructure changes needed? The Brewers used to play on Miller Park Way. Highway signs now read Brewers Blvd.

  5. I can’t stop laughing every time I see the new name of their stadium, lol!

  6. Schism Lateralus says:
    July 28, 2022 at 1:18 pm
    10 million for naming rights, and in this article the old sponsor’s name is mentioned several times- the new one? Zero.
    ___________

    The article is about the effort necessary to remove the former sponsor’s name. Of course the old name is going to be mentioned several times. Seems pretty normal.

  7. I wonder if the people who question the amounts paid for naming rights have any experience in marketing. Have they read or conducted any studies regarding the return on investment for naming rights?

    An individual’s thoughts about whether stadium naming is effective advertising are irrelevant. Large corporations employ entire public relations departments as well as outside consultants. Paying $10 million for naming rights is not done without extensive research showing that expenditure will be effective.

  8. Well, if it’s too hard for them, they can always give back the $10 million a year.

  9. You mean ketchup doesn’t just wipe off with a napkin? try a little club soda!

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