Davis Mills: I think I’ve developed a lot since the end of last season

USA TODAY Sports

Throughout the offseason, the Texans have been clear in their support for Davis Mills entering the season as their starting quarterback.

Selected in the third round out of Stanford last year, Mills went 2-9 in his 11 starts as a rookie. Overall, he completed 66.8 percent of his passes for 2,664 yards with 16 touchdowns and 10 interceptions in 13 appearances — good for an 88.8 passer rating.

But in his last five starts, Mills led the Texans to a 2-3 record with victories over the Jaguars and Chargers. Houston also gave Tennessee all it could handle in Week 18, with the Titans winning 28-25. In those contests, Mills compiled a 102.4 passer rating, completing 68 percent of his passes for 1,258 yards with nine touchdowns and two picks.

With last year’s passing game coordinator/QBs coach Pep Hamilton taking over as offensive coordinator in 2022, there’s reason for optimism when it comes to Mills’ play. This week, the quarterback said he feels really good in his second training camp.

“I think I’ve developed a lot since the end of last season,” Mills said, via Deepi Sidhu of the team’s website. “I think I felt the progression at the end of last year and then really taking it into the offseason, big momentum and stacking on it has allowed me to come out here and start playing really fast at the start of training camp and throughout OTAs. I’m excited to keep progressing.”

Mills did the things quarterbacks are expected to do these days, like bring his receivers together for offsite, offseason workouts. And he said he worked on specific weak points from his rookie season.

“We kind of pinpointed and saw the shot chart or the throw chart from across the field, saw the different percentages, and I had a couple boxes where I needed to work on, so I focused on those type of throws, just making sure my feet and my body were in line to make all those throws,” Mills said. “The biggest thing is just coming out and being ahead of schedule in the playbook so you can come out and play fast.”

No one outside their building really expects much from the Texans in 2022. But if Mills continues his trajectory from the end of 2021, they could surprise some teams in the coming season.

6 responses to “Davis Mills: I think I’ve developed a lot since the end of last season

  1. Mills is the real deal. Put any kind of team around him and you’ll be competitive.

  2. Nobody talking about Houston outside of Houston. Sneaky good team this year, no pressure on them and they will upset the apple cart at certain points this season, maybe more.

    Stanford turning out some good QB’s lately. Mills followed up this year by Tanner McKee who will go in 1st round next April

  3. Mills was the #1 ranked QB out of high school, ahead of Trevor Lawrence. However, due to circumstances (injury, pandemic & Pac-12 xcling season, etc) played only 11 games at Stanford. He comes out early and is drafted by a team in shambles; a massage-predator, a horrible completely turning over roster, some head coach no one has heard of, no oline, worst running game in NFL, etc, just a mess. He’s then thrown in – at halftime – of game 2 his rookie year. But by end of season he looks like, by far, the best rookie QB in the league; even though his team is still awful. The Texans have 2 first round picks next draft and it’s going be a great QB draft. Couple that with the Texans owner, Cal McNair, is the dumbest owner in the league, never done anything on his own and constantly reacts to the winds of the Twitter crowd and Mills has an uphill battle to be the 2023 Texans QB. But he’s legit. Look at the bios when both came out of college (hgt, wgt, etc) and look at how they play, reminds me a lot of another Stanford alum, Andrew Luck.

  4. I think he’ll end up being Kirk Cousins 2.0 (with perhaps a better head on his shoulders). I don’t mean that as a slight either. I think that level of play and trajectory is better than most are giving him credit for right now.

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