Commanders’ controversy helps spark law limiting NDAs

NFL: NOV 20 Commanders at Texans
Getty Images

Whenever Congress investigates a private business, a chorus inevitably emerges.

Doesn’t Congress have better things to do?

Technically, it does. But Congress can multitask. Those who would prefer not to be scrutinized love to push the narrative that Congressional priorities shouldn’t include scrutinizing potential wrongdoing of that otherwise would go unscrutinized.

And those investigations can result in (drum roll) legislation. That’s what has happened as it relates to the Commanders.

Via A.J. Perez of FrontOfficeSports.com, President Joe Biden has signed into law the Speak Out Act. It affects the manner in which non-disclosure agreements are enforced in cases involving sexual assault and sexual harassment. The debate included references to the Commanders, whose toxic workplace came under the scrutiny of the House Oversight & Reform Committee.

The Committee is expected to produce a report regarding its work before the current Congress concludes its business for the year. In 2023, the Republican Party will take control of the House of Representatives and its various committees, essentially ending the investigation of the Commanders.

13 responses to “Commanders’ controversy helps spark law limiting NDAs

  1. This was driven much farther and for much longer by Harvey Weinstein and Donald Trump/Stormy Daniels than by the WFT investigation. One might even say that the WFT was mentioned mainly to justify the effort put into that investigation.

  2. Employers must learn they don’t own their employees. Expect loyalty from workers, yes, but not to dominate their lives by employers.
    Work to live,don’t live to work!

  3. “But Congress can multitask.”

    Proof?

    Congress hasn’t passed an actual budget for the country, arguably their most important role as Congress has the power of the purse, since 2015.

  4. The effect of this will be that there will be fewer settlements offered in these cases and Plaintiffs will be forced to go to trial.

  5. boozygoose says:
    December 8, 2022 at 5:51 am
    “But Congress can multitask.”

    Proof?

    Congress hasn’t passed an actual budget for the country, arguably their most important role as Congress has the power of the purse, since 2015.
    ______________

    Actually it is only the House, not the entire Congress, that holds the power of the purse. All spending bills have to originate in the House.

    A budget has been passed every year, otherwise the federal government would have shut down a long time ago.

  6. gibson45 says:
    December 8, 2022 at 10:14 am

    ______________

    Actually it is only the House, not the entire Congress, that holds the power of the purse. All spending bills have to originate in the House.

    A budget has been passed every year, otherwise the federal government would have shut down a long time ago.

    00Rate This

    Under Article One of the Constitution Congress is a bicameral legislature consisting of the House of Representatives and the Senate.

    The U.S. Constitution does not call for spending bills to start in the House. Rather, the Origination Clause requires that “All Bills for raising revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives.” The Senate’s deferral to the House is a matter of custom rather than requirement.

    However, the custom of starting bills in the House isn’t always followed. For instance, in 1998, the Senate passed seven appropriations bills before the House acted.

    Finally, you are conflating an annual budget being passed with appropriation bills and a series of continuing resolutions. They serve to fund the government in the ABSCENCE of a budget.

    Congress did not pass any FY 2023 regular appropriations bills by September 30, so it passed a continuing resolution (CR) to keep the government funded through December 16, 2022. Congress’s current challenge is to pass another spending bill before December 17, or the government will shut down. There have been talks of another short-term CR, and some wondered if Congress will simply pass a full-year CR.

  7. Justice subjectively favors the wealthy. I’m for anything that brings more balance & objectivity to the law – this act encourages more accountability and balance, therefor it is a good thing.

  8. boozygoose – Thank you for the clarification on the Origination Clause.

    It is irrelevant whether Congress is a bicameral legislature. Each part operates under its own rules, powers, and limitations.

    I never said that the budgets passed were annual budgets. I am not sure why you are so hung up on the formality of such. The last seven years of funding decisions you cited are proof that a formal, overall budget is not necessary.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.