Anthony Lynn: 49ers resources, willingness to win are different than what I experienced with Chargers

Washington Commanders v San Francisco 49ers
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The Chargers fired former head coach Anthony Lynn after the team finished the 2020 season 7-9, which gave him a 33-31 record over four seasons.

After a brief stint as the Lions’ offensive coordinator last year, Lynn landed with the 49ers in 2022 as the club’s assistant head coach and running backs coach.

San Francisco could be on the way to a Super Bowl appearance while the Chargers are on the hunt for a new offensive coordinator after blowing a 27-0 lead to the Jaguars in the wild card round.

Lynn said in an interview with Sam Farmer of the L.A. Times that the organization he’s with now is better set up for success.

“This organization will do whatever it takes to win,” Lynn said. “Resources out the [ears]. That was different for me compared to what I was going through in L.A. So it’s just like, man, this is what it’s supposed to be like. I forgot how that felt.”

Notably, the 49ers made a midseason trade for running back Christian McCaffrey, who has been a key piece for a 49ers team that hasn’t lost since late October.

Lynn’s coaching tenure didn’t work out with the Chargers. But after winning a pair of Super Bowl rings as a player under head coach Mike Shanahan with the Broncos, he may get his first as a coach with Kyle Shanahan in San Francisco.

15 responses to “Anthony Lynn: 49ers resources, willingness to win are different than what I experienced with Chargers

  1. Duh. That’s why no one with options goes to the Chargers. They are one of the teams with bad ownership.

  2. Lynn made some clock goofs with the Chargers but they’d have been far better keeping him and having him work on clock management than ditching him for their current coach who is absolutely terrible.

  3. Remember when Old Man Spanos wouldn’t pay Fred Dean, so he traded him to the 49ers mid-season, and they went on to win the ’81 Super Bowl? Times never change!

  4. Somehow I think if the Chargers had kept Lynn and gotten the best OC that money could buy and that coach had remained consistent through Herbert’s time, they’d be in better shape now.

    But sure, maybe turning over the coaching staff every season is great for a promising young QB’s development.

  5. Chargers have one of the worst owners in the league. I feel bad for Chargers fans having had to endure the Spanos’ incompetence for so long.

  6. Liked Lynn when he was with Buffalo but he never should have got the job in SD. He didn’t have the experience but this is a good example how careers can go. There are always about 5-6 teams every year that coaches leave for other teams, rarely are the bad teams, but over time you keep at it and you land with a good team that is when things happen

  7. Favorite line of this post “the Chargers are on the hunt for a new offensive coordinator after blowing a 27-0 lead to the Jaguars in the wild card round.” They blew a 27 point lead in a playoff game so lets fire the OC and ignore the fact the head coach is supposed to be a defensive minded coach.

  8. 2500claimer says:
    January 18, 2023 at 11:00 am
    Remember when Old Man Spanos wouldn’t pay Fred Dean, so he traded him to the 49ers mid-season, and they went on to win the ’81 Super Bowl? Times never change!

    ============

    That wasn’t Spanos. The Charger owner at that time was Gene Klein. Klein owned the team until 1984. Johnny Jefferson and Fred Dean were trade in 1981. Spanos bought the team in 1984.

    Johnny Jefferson had the best hands for a wide receiver at that time. That dude caught everything.

  9. The one time they had it right, they fired the coach and hired Norv Turner. That says it all.

  10. It was Chargers owner Eugene Klein who traded Fred Dean and John Jefferson over money. As hard as it is to believe, Klein may have been even cheaper than Alex Spanos, who was notoriously cheap, so cheap in fact, that he got out-bid by Eddie DeBartolo Sr. to buy the 49ers in 1977.

    Al Davis’ lawsuit against the league in the early ’80s so enraged Klein that Klein had a heart attack and was forced to sell the Chargers in 1984. Alex Spanos made sure he wasn’t out-bid this time, but he still tried to run the franchise on the cheap, which explains so many years of futility for the Chargers and their fans.

    Alex’s oldest son, Dean, now runs the franchise with is brother and two sons, but they are poor, relatively speaking for NFL owners, and they still run the franchise on the cheap because they don’t have money. Add to this that Dean’s sister keeps suing him over the Chargers, which is funneling money away from the family trust and its obligations, and you have a franchise that can’t compete.

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